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TABLE OF CONTENTS


Historical Note

Scope and Contents

Restrictions

Index Terms

Administrative Information

Accession Numbers

Description of Series

Photographic album - 1, undated

Photographic album - 2, undated

Signed photograph of Paul Tibbets, July 6, 1945

Stevie Seabee Atomic Bomb news clipping, August 24, 1945

Pacific Courant newspaper, Atomic Bomb Report, Guam, August 16, 1945

The Manila Free Philippines newspaper: Aftermath of atomic bombs, Japanese surrender, and the end of World War II (6 copies), August 8, 1945 to August 29, 1945

Photographic album of African American soldiers - 1, undated

Photographic album of African American soldiers - 2, 1946, undated

Album of photographic and other materials, 1949, undated

20 oversized photographs depicting the aftermath of the atomic bombing of Japan, 1945-1975

Books

Magazines

Poster: 17" x 22 ½". Hiroshima/Nagasaki: Thirty Years, August 6, 1945/August 9, 1945. 35-mile Walk for Peace—Santa Monica to Long Beach [1975]. Sponsored by: Women Strike for Peace, War Resisters League, American Friends Service Committee, The Catholic Worker Peoples Action Union—South Bay, Military Services Counseling Center, Free Venice Resistance Fellowship of Reconciliation, National Association of Social Workers, St. Justin Martyr Social Action Group. On the back, quote by Allen Ginsburg, Dec. 16, 1969. "No Money, No War." Government Anarchy prolongs illegal planet war over decades in Vietnam. Federal Anarchy plunges U.S. cities into violent chaos. Conscientious objection to war tax payment subsidizing mass murder abroad and consequent ecological disaster at home will save lives & labor and is the gentlest way of political revolution in America. If money talks, several hundred thousand citizens refusing tax payments to our war government will short circuit the nerve system of our electronic bureaucracy.

University of Texas, Dolph Briscoe Center for American History

Atomic Bombing and American Occupation of Japan Collection, 1941-2020



Title: Atomic bombing and American occupation of Japan collection
Dates: 1941-2020
Identification: camh-arc-004108
Extent: 2 linear feet
Language: Materials are written in English and Japanese.
Repository: Dolph Briscoe Center for American History

Historical Note

The U.S. occupation of Japan began in 1945 following World War II and lasted until 1952. Under "demilitarization" and "democratization" policy, the United States sought to restructure Japan's government, economy, and society to encourage political allegiance and limit the likelihood of a return to arms. The materials in this collection document this period in the history of Japan.

Source:

"The American Occupation of Japan, 1945-1952." Asia for Educators. Columbia University. Accessed April 29, 2019.

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Scope and Contents

The American occupation of Japan collection contains photographic materials of the Japanese Imperial Army and the American occupation of Japan during and following World War II. Two volumes contain photographs of African-American soldiers of the 5th Air Force. Included is a signed photograph of Col. Paul Tibbets waving from the Enola Gay, the airplane that dropped an atomic bomb on Hiroshima, Japan.

Furthermore, the collection contains books and magazines documenting the aftermath of the U.S. dropping the atomic bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki, 1946-2020. These publications complement the Hiroshima and Nagasaki Atomic Bomb Photographic Archive of the Anti-Nuclear Photographer's Movement of Japan and also the Tsuneo Enari Photographic Archive.

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Restrictions

Conditions Governing Access

This collection is open for research use.

Conditions Governing Use

There are no use restrictions on this collection. Publisher is responsible for complying with copyright law.

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Index Terms

Subjects
Bombings
Military occupation
World War (1939-1945)
Places
Japan
Document Types
Books
Photographs
Scrapbooks

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Administrative Information

Preferred Citation

Atomic Bombing and American Occupation of Japan Collection, 1941-2020, Dolph Briscoe Center for American History, University of Texas at Austin.

Processing Information

This collection was processed by Blaine Finstein, April 2019.

Subsequent revisions were made by Gillian Morton, January 2020; and Jessi Fishman, September 2020.

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Accession Numbers

2019-062; 2019-066; 2019-151, 2020-075

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Detailed Description of the Collection

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2.325/J12a [SRH1230003184] Photographic album - 1, undated

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2.325/J12a [SRH1230003184] Photographic album - 2, undated

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2.325/J12a [SRH1230003184] Signed photograph of Paul Tibbets, July 6, 1945

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2.325/J12a [SRH1230003184] Stevie Seabee Atomic Bomb news clipping, August 24, 1945

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2.325/J12a [SRH1230003184] Pacific Courant newspaper, Atomic Bomb Report, Guam, August 16, 1945

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2.325/J12a [SRH1230003184] The Manila Free Philippines newspaper: Aftermath of atomic bombs, Japanese surrender, and the end of World War II (6 copies), August 8, 1945 to August 29, 1945

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2.325/J12b [SRH1230003194] Photographic album of African American soldiers - 1, undated

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2.325/J12b [SRH1230003194] Photographic album of African American soldiers - 2, 1946, undated

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2.325/J12b [SRH1230003194] Album of photographic and other materials, 1949, undated

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2AA48 [SRH1230020425] 20 oversized photographs depicting the aftermath of the atomic bombing of Japan, 1945-1975
Photographs 1-4 depicting mushroom clouds above Hiroshima and Nagasaki, city destruction, and injured Japanese citizens, 1945, August 6, 1945, August 9, 1945, September 1945, October 1945
Photographs 5-8 depicting city destruction, rubble, survivors, and casualties, 1945, August 10, 1945, October 1945
Photographs 9-12 depicting city destruction (in color), human injuries (in color), and the shadows of victims imprinted into the ground, 1945, September 1945, October 1945, October 1946
Photographs 13-16 depicting human injuries (in color), and casualties in rubble, 1945, August 10, 1945, 1975
Photographs 17-20 depicting hair loss in bombing victim, memorial with pile of human bones, survivor standing in rubble next to a casualty, and memorials for Hiroshima and Nagasaki commemorating the bombings (in color), 1945, circa 1975
Atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki epicenter maps on cardboard box , August 1945

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2020-075/1 Books
Hersey, John. Hiroshima. New York: Vintage Books, a division of Random House. Copyright 1946. Paperback. Two copies.
Hiroshima Appeal Committee. Hiroshima Wishes to Tell. Published: 1977; 1979.
Hiroshima Appeal Committee. Hiroshima Peace Memorial Museum. 1982.
Hiroshima Peace Culture Foundation. Hiroshima. "This photographic booklet records the A-bomb disaster of Hiroshima." Printed by Nakamoto Sogo Printing Co., Ltd. 1985.
Kashihara, Tomoko and Yoshito Matsushige. The Viewfinder Clouded with Tears. "This is a record of what Mr. Yoshito Matsushige, a newspaper photographer then aged 32, saw in Hiroshima on August 6, 1945. He took all photos in this book, which are reproduced with kind permission of the Chugoku Shimbun Co., Ltd. While interviewing him again and again, I tried to write down his words as he actually spoke them. When the draft was ready, I showed it to him to make sure that I had not misunderstood him." Tokyo, 2016. ISBN978-4-32407114-4 C0072.
Matsumara Akira, copyright 2010. Common Nagasaki: 65 years after A-bomb. Produced and edited by Nishiyama Shunichi. Designed by Takahashi Katsuya (JDS Graphic). Published by Mado-sha. ISBN978-4-89625-098-5 C0072.
Matsumara Akira, copyright 2015. Evidence Nagasaki: Ground Zero. Translator: Hisato Kawata. Designer: Satsuki Ishiyama. Publisher: Kunihiro Takahashi. ISBN 978-4-88773-163-9 C0072.
Matsumara Akira, copyright 2020. Flash Memories: The atomic bombing – 75 years on. ISBN978-4-88851-338-8 C0072.
Nagai, Takashi. We of Nagasaki: The story of the survivors in an atomic world. Translated by Ichiro Shirato and Herbert B. L. Silverman. New York: Duell, Sloan and Pearce, 1948, 1949.
Shogo Nagaoka. Hiroshima Under Atomic Bomb Attack.
Southard, Susan. Nagasaki: Life After Nuclear War. Copyright 2015. New York: Viking. ISBN 978-0-670-02562-6.
Su-nam, Pak. The Other Hiroshima: Korean A-bomb victims tell their story. Self-published by author, August 6, 1982. Japan. Translated by: Greg Barrett, Bill Healy, Warren Hesse, Phil Hill, Sachiko Ikushima, Kikuko Oura, Yumiko Sato. Photographs by Kiyoshi Fujikawa.
Takaki, Ronald. Hiroshima: Why America dropped the atomic bomb. Little, Brown and Company: Boston, New York, Toronto, London. Copyright 1995. ISBN 0-316-83124.
Walker, J. Samuel. Prompt and utter destruction: Truman and the use of atomic bombs against Japan. Chapel Hill: The University of North Carolina Press, copyright 2016.
Yamahata, Yosuke, 1917-1966. Nagasaki Journey: The Photographs of Yosuke Yamahata, August 10, 1945. [Nagasaki jāniī]/Independent Documentary Group; editor, Rupert Jenkins; associate editors, Miryam Sas, Judy Irving, Mark Chambers. ISBN 0-87654-360-3. 2 copies, one hardback and one paperback. The hardback contains an insert. This book is published in conjunction with "Nagasaki Journey: The Photographs of Yosukey Yamahata," a traveling exhibition of photographs with a documentary film, organized by the Independent Documentary Group, San Francisco, and managed by Exhibit Touring Services, Eastern Washington University, Cheney, WA. 99004.
[Photographs from Hiroshima and Nagasaki after the atomic bombs were dropped.] Small book in Japanese.
[Photographs of Nagasaki after the atomic bomb was dropped.] Small book in Japanese.
Yoshiteru Kosakai, compiler. A-Bomb: A City Tells its Story. Translated by Kiyoko Kageyama, Charlotte Susu-Mago, Kaoru Ogura. Hiroshima Peace Culture Foundation. Copyright 1972.
Days to Remember: An account of the bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. Prepared by Committee of Japanese Citizens to send gift copies of a photographic & pictorial record of the atomic bombing to our children, and fellow human beings of the world. Copyright 1981 by Hiroshima-Nagasaki Publishing Committee.
Hiroshima Photograph: Scenes of A-bomb Explosion, 1952. Documentary pictures of Hiroshima where the world [sic] first atom bomb was dropped at 8:15 a.m. on Aug. 6th in 1945, and how the city has been restored as a peaceful city. Yuichiro Sasaki, editor. Photographs by Yuichiro Sasaki, Yoshie Yamamoto, Yoshito Matsushige, Seizo Yamada.
[Photos of the aftermath of the dropping of the atomic bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki. Japanese text.] 1987. ISBN 4-87648-036-2 C0372.
[Author not written in English.] No More Hiroshima. [Publication date not in English. No ISBN.]
[Book of photographs of Nagasaki, entirely in Japanese. Author, title, publication date all in Japanese. No ISBN.]

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2020-075/1 Magazines
The Asahi Picture News, [August 6,] 1952. Photographs of the devastation caused by the bombs dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki.
Collier's, August 5, 1950. "Hiroshima, U.S.A. Can anything be done about it?" Note about the cover: When Chesley Bonestell (pronounced Bon-es-tell) was commissioned, five years after Hiroshima was destroyed, to paint a conception of an A-bomb attack on Manhattan, he sought an aerial view of a scene he has often witnessed from a plane while coming in at New lane while coming in at New York's La Guardia Field. You're looking at the blast from a point approximately 1,500 feet over the Statue of Liberty, with the Battery and the financial district in the foreground and the Empire State Building (reflecting the orange blast) uptown at the left. The story of this story: "For five years now the world has lived with the dreadful knowledge that atomic warfare is possible. Since last September, when the President announced publicly that the Russians too had produced an atomic explosion, this nation has lived face to face with the terrifying realization that an attack with atomic weapons could be made against us. But, until now, no responsible voice has evaluated the problem constructively, in words everybody can understand. Collier's gives it more than customary space in the conviction that, when the danger is delineated and the means to combat it effectively is made clear, democracy will have an infinitely stronger chance to survive."
LIFE, August 20, 1945. LIFE'S Reports, "The Atom Bomb and Future War."
LIFE, September 29, 1952. "First pictures—Atom blasts through eyes of victims."
Newsweek, August 9, 1965. Cover story "The Bomb: The Next Twenty Years." Color photo of Hiroshima, 1945. "First there was one finger on the atomic trigger; now there are five and soon more nations may join the nuclear club. Can the spread of nuclear weapons be halted? In an urgent message to the disarmament conference in Geneva, President Johnson called this 'the most important task on earth.' In this week's cover story, Senior Editor Edwin Diamond-who has visited Hiroshima and watched atomic tests in Nevada—writes of the problems of proliferation." pp. 52-57.

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2AA48 [SRH1230020425] Poster: 17" x 22 ½". Hiroshima/Nagasaki: Thirty Years, August 6, 1945/August 9, 1945. 35-mile Walk for Peace—Santa Monica to Long Beach [1975]. Sponsored by: Women Strike for Peace, War Resisters League, American Friends Service Committee, The Catholic Worker Peoples Action Union—South Bay, Military Services Counseling Center, Free Venice Resistance Fellowship of Reconciliation, National Association of Social Workers, St. Justin Martyr Social Action Group. On the back, quote by Allen Ginsburg, Dec. 16, 1969. "No Money, No War." Government Anarchy prolongs illegal planet war over decades in Vietnam. Federal Anarchy plunges U.S. cities into violent chaos. Conscientious objection to war tax payment subsidizing mass murder abroad and consequent ecological disaster at home will save lives & labor and is the gentlest way of political revolution in America. If money talks, several hundred thousand citizens refusing tax payments to our war government will short circuit the nerve system of our electronic bureaucracy.

Return to the Table of Contents