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TABLE OF CONTENTS


Overview

Historical Sketch

Scope and Contents of the Collection

Arrangement of the Collection

Restrictions

Index Terms

Related Material

Administrative Information

Description of Series

Mary Stark Collard daguerreotype, about 1845-1862,

Texas State Library and Archives Commission

An Inventory of the Mary Stark Collard Daguerreotype at the Texas State Archives, about 1845-1862



Overview

Title: Mary Stark Collard daguerreotype
Dates: about 1845-1862
Abstract: Mary Stark Collard was the wife of Texas pioneer and surveyor Elijah Simmons Collard and mother to Jonathan, Lemuel Miller, Job Stark and James Harrison Collard, who all fought for Texas independence. This daguerreotype is a portrait of Mary Stark Collard created by an unknown photographer while she was living in Texas, dating about 1845-1862. This item has been digitized and is part of the Texas Digital Archive.
Quantity: 0.05 cubic ft. (1 photograph)
Language: No linguistic content.
Repository: Texas State Archives
Sponsor: This EAD finding aid was created in cooperation with Texas Archival Resources Online.

Historical Sketch

Mary Stark was born on July 25, 1782, in New Jersey. She married Elijah Simmons Collard in Kentucky on May 2, 1801, and they had seven children: Lemuel Miller Collard, Emily Whitley, Job Stark Collard, Evaline A. Dunn, Jonathan Stark Collard, James Harrison Collard, and Elijah Simmons Collard. In 1833, Mary Stark Collard came to Texas with her family to join her son, Lemuel Miller Collard, who had been in Texas since 1828. The family settled in the newly formed Municipality of Washington, and in October 1835, Elijah Collard was elected to represent that municipality at the Consultation of San Felipe de Austin, along with four other men. The purpose of this General Convention (or First Council of Texas) was to prepare a declaration setting forth the causes which had driven the Texans to take up arms against Mexico and to draw up plans for a provisional government independent of Mexico. On November 13, 1835, the General Convention elected Elijah Collard to its governing committee. Four of Collard's sons–Jonathan, Lemuel Miller, Job Stark and James Harrison Collard–fought for Texas Independence and received land grants from the Republic of Texas for their participation in the war.

Mary Stark Collard died on December 24, 1862, and is buried in Gourd Creek Cemetery near New Waverly in Walker County, Texas. Her gravestone is located next to the combined headstone and Texas historical marker on her husband's grave.

(Sources include: Rackley, Anne M. "Collard, Elijah Simmons." Handbook of Texas Online; Mary Collard, U.S., Find a Grave Index, 1600s-Current [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA., Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2012; both accessed on March 14, 2018.)

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Scope and Contents of the Collection

Mary Stark Collard was the wife of Texas pioneer and surveyor, Elijah Simmons Collard, and mother to Jonathan, Lemuel Miller, Job Stark, and James Harrison Collard, who all fought for Texas independence. This daguerreotype is a portrait of Mary Stark Collard, created by an unknown photographer while Collard was living in Texas, dating about 1845-1862. The daguerreotype is a quarter plate, measuring 3 ¼ x 4 ¼-inches. The image is in a hinged case with a brass mat, decorative brass preserver, and interior velvet pad. Some deterioration is present on the surface of the image.

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Arrangement of the Collection

The collection consists of a single item.

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Restrictions

Restrictions on Access

Materials do not circulate, but may be used in the State Archives search room. Materials will be retrieved from and returned to storage areas by staff members.

Restrictions on Use

Under the Copyright Law of 1976 as amended in 1998, unpublished works are protected for the life of the author plus 70 years. The term of copyright for published material varies. Researchers are responsible for complying with the Copyright Law (Title 17 U.S.C.).

Technical Requirements

Researchers are required to wear gloves when reviewing photographic materials.

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Index Terms

The terms listed here were used to catalog the records. The terms can be used to find similar or related records.
Subjects (Persons):
Collard, Mary Stark, 1782-1862.
Subjects:
Women--Texas--Pictorial works.
Places:
Texas.
Document Types:
Photographs--Texas.
Daguerreotypes (photographs)--Texas.
Portraits--Texas.

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Related Material

The following materials are offered as possible sources of further information on the agencies and subjects covered by the records. The listing is not exhaustive.

Texas State Archives
[See Texas In Focus: Early Photographs from the State Archives for more information about historical photographic processes in our collections.]
Texas Comptroller's Office claims records, 1835-1990, undated, 966.81 cubic ft. [Republic claims online database.]

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Administrative Information

Preferred Citation

Mary Stark Collard daguerreotype. Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.

Accession Information

Accession number: 2017/049

This item was donated to the Archives and Information Services Division of the Texas State Library and Archives Commission by descendants of Mary Stark Collard, Dr. Stephen M. Collard and his sons Ashton A. Collard and Seaton C. Collard on December 20, 2016.

Processing Information

Processed by Halley Grogan, March 2018

Other Formats for the Collection

The image described in this finding aid has been digitized and is part of the Texas Digital Archive, available online at https://tsl.access.preservica.com/tda/prints-and-photo-collections/mary-stark-collard/.

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Detailed Description of the Collection

Mary Stark Collard daguerreotype, about 1845-1862,
0.05 cubic ft. (1 photograph)

Photo
2017/049-1 Mary Stark Collard, about 1845-1862
[one 3 ¼ x 4 ¼-inch daguerreotype (photograph)]

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