Texas State Library and Archives Commission

Texas Governor Richard Coke:

An Inventory of Governor Richard Coke Records at the Texas State Archives, 1873-1877, undated



Overview

Creator: Texas. Governor (1874-1876 : Coke)
Title: Governor Richard Coke records
Dates: 1873-1877, undated
Abstract: The governor of Texas is the chief executive officer of the state elected by citizens every four years. Richard Coke served as governor from January 15, 1874, to December 1, 1876. These records mainly document Governor Coke's term in office. Types of records include correspondence, proclamations, messages to the Texas Legislature, printed material, letterpress books, petitions, and reports, dating from 1873 to 1877 and undated.
Quantity: 2.5 cubic ft.
Language: These materials are written predominately in English with scattered Spanish throughout.
Repository: Texas State Archives
Sponsor: In May 2013 these records were adopted for conservation by Dr. Glen Sample Ely in honor of TSLAC Preservation Officer John Anderson and his many years of service. This EAD finding aid was created in part with funds provided by the Texas Telecommunications Infrastructure Fund Board for the Texas Archival Resources Online project.

Agency History

The governor of Texas is the chief executive officer of the state elected by citizens every four years. The duties and responsibilities of the governor include serving as commander-in-chief of the state's military forces; convening special sessions of the legislature for specific purposes; delivering to the legislature at the beginning of each regular session a report on the condition of the state, an accounting of all public money under the governor's control, a recommended biennial budget, an estimate of the amounts of money required to be raised by taxation, and any recommendations he deems necessary; signing or vetoing bills passed by the legislature; and executing the laws of the state.

The office of the governor of the state of Texas was created by the Texas Constitution of 1845. It superseded the office of the president of the Republic of Texas upon the annexation of Texas by the United States. The 1845 Constitution defined the term of office as two years, with no more than four years served in a six-year period. The governor was required to be thirty years old at minimum, a U.S. citizen, and a Texas resident for at least three years (Article V, Section 4).

The Constitution outlined a number of powers held by the governor of Texas. The governor acted as the commander-in-chief of the army, navy, and militia of the state unless they were transferred into service under the federal government (Article V, Section 6). He could call up a state militia to "execute the laws of the State to suppress insurrections, and to repel invasions" (Article VI, Section 4). The governor made recommendations to the legislature and provided written information on the state of the government (Article V, Section 9). He could also convene the legislature when necessary and adjourn the legislature in the case of a disagreement between the House and Senate (Article V, Section 8). The governor had the power to grant reprieves and pardons in criminal cases except those of treason or impeachment, and to approve or disapprove bills, orders, resolutions, or votes from the legislature (Article V, Sections 11, 17 and 18). The governor also appointed supreme and district court judges and an attorney general with the consent of two-thirds of the senate (Article IV, Sections 5 and 12).

The 1845 Constitution also created the office of secretary of state, appointed by the governor and confirmed by the senate for the governor's term of service. The secretary of state worked closely with the governor, and was required to "keep a fair register of all official acts and proceedings of the governor" (Article V, Section 16). The Constitution called for the election of a lieutenant governor at the time of the governor's election with the same qualifications and term of office, but to be voted for separately by electors. The lieutenant governor served as president of the senate and could cast a deciding vote in ties, as well as take on the governor's powers in his absence or until a new governor was elected and qualified or the previous governor was able to resume office (Article V, Section 12). In addition, it further called for the biennial election of a state treasurer and comptroller of public accounts by the legislature, with vacancies to be filled by the governor (Article V, Section 23). However, a constitutional amendment in 1850 allowed the public election of the state treasurer and comptroller.

The constitutional language defining the office of the governor changed marginally with the Texas Constitution of 1861, which was written when Texas seceded from the United States to join the Confederate States at the onset of the Civil War. The 1861 Constitution replaced mention of the United States with the Confederate States, removed a requirement for U.S. citizenship for Texas governors, raised the governor's salary, and set a date for the governor and lieutenant governor to take office after an election.

The Constitution of 1866 arose out of the Constitution of 1861 with certain amendments made during the Constitutional Convention of 1866. These amendments were intended to bring the Texas constitution back into compliance with U.S. law. The Constitution of 1866 made minor alterations to the office of the governor, extending his term of office to four years with no more than eight years served in a 12-year period, and increasing his salary to $4,000 annually. He was also granted the power of the item veto on appropriations and to convene the legislature outside of the state capital if necessary.

Another constitutional convention took place in 1868-1869 under the Reconstruction Acts of 1867, ultimately producing the Constitution of 1869. It affected the office of the governor by again raising the governor's salary, this time to $5,000 annually, and giving the governor the right to appoint the attorney general and secretary of state, with the other state offices being appointed by election. The Constitution of 1876 subsequently reverted the governor's term back to two years and the governor's salary to $4,000 annually. It provided for the use and occupation of the governor's mansion, fixtures, and furniture. In addition, all vacancies in state or district offices, except for members of the Legislature, were to be filled by appointment of the governor, with the advice and consent of two-thirds of the senate.

(Sources: Texas Constitution of 1845, Texas Constitution of 1861, Texas Constitution of 1866, and Texas Constitution of 1876, all online at the Tarlton Law Library; S.S. McKay, "Constitution of 1845"; Walter L. Buenger, "Constitution of 1861"; and S.S. McKay, "Constitution of 1866," Handbook of Texas Online, all accessed on May 1, 2018.)


Biographical Sketch

Richard Coke, governor of Texas, held office from January 15, 1874, to December 1, 1876. Coke was born March 13, 1829, in Williamsburg, Virginia. He graduated from the College of William and Mary, and began practicing law before moving to Waco, Texas, in 1850. In 1859 he was a member of a commission which removed the Brazos Reservation Indians to the Indian Territory. After serving in the Secession Convention of 1861, Coke rose in the ranks of the Confederate Army from private to captain. In 1865 he was appointed judge of the 19th Judicial District, and in 1866 was elected Supreme Court associate justice, but was removed from that position by military governor General Philip Sheridan in 1867 as an "impediment to reconstruction."

In 1873, Coke won the governor's chair over Edmund Jackson Davis. Several tense days in January 1874 saw the state capitol turned into an armed camp, with two rival legislatures, as Davis refused to surrender his office. When President Ulysses S. Grant would not support Davis' request for troops, Davis conceded and Coke was inaugurated as governor. During Coke's term in office, he faced a state government that was in debt and without funds, and a vulnerable frontier plagued by Indian depredations, border violence, and lawlessness. Coke reduced expenditures and overhauled the public school system, reverting it from centralized public control to local control. The state's first public institution of higher education, the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas (later Texas A&M), opened in October, 1876. Coke was re-elected in 1876 after the Constitution of 1876 returned the governor's term of office to two years. Later the same year, he was elected to the U.S. Senate, and resigned from the governorship on December 1, 1876. Coke served three terms in the Senate (1877-1895) and died in Waco, Texas on May 14, 1897.

(Source: John W. Payne, Jr., "Coke, Richard," Handbook of Texas Online, accessed on May 1, 2018.)


Scope and Contents of the Records

The governor of Texas is the chief executive officer of the state elected by citizens every four years. Richard Coke served as governor of Texas from January 15, 1874, to December 1, 1876. These records mainly document Governor Coke's term in office. Types of records include correspondence, proclamations, messages to the Texas Legislature, printed material, letterpress books, petitions, and reports, from 1873 to 1877 and undated. Correspondence includes requests and recommendations for appointment to office and for pardon of convicts; reports on Mexican border problems, such as gangs of thieves crossing the Rio Grande; Indian depredations; requests for frontier protection; and discussions regarding school lands, railroads, violence, the Constitutional Convention of 1875, and the creation of Ranger companies and militias. Most correspondence is with state and local officials, citizens of various counties, and newspaper editors. Correspondence is mostly incoming, with occasional notes or replies from the governor. Noteworthy correspondents include James K.P. Campbell, Louis Cardis, David B. Culberson, Stephen H. Darden, Andrew J. Dorn, William F. Egan, Charles Fowler, Richard B. Hubbard, Oran M. Roberts, William H. Russell, and William Steele.


Arrangement of the Records

Arrangement is generally by type of material, then chronological.

Restrictions

Restrictions on Access

Materials do not circulate, but may be used in the State Archives search room. Materials will be retrieved from and returned to storage areas by staff members.

Restrictions on Use

Most records created by Texas state agencies are not copyrighted. State records also include materials received by, not created by, state agencies. Copyright remains with the creator. The researcher is responsible for complying with U.S. Copyright Law (Title 17 U.S.C.).

Technical Requirements

The letterpress volumes are extremely fragile and may not be photocopied.


Index Terms

The terms listed here were used to catalog the records. The terms can be used to find similar or related records.
Personal Names:
Coke, Richard, 1829-1897.
Corporate Names:
Texas. Office of the Governor.
Subjects (Organizations):
Texas Rangers.
Texas. Constitutional Convention (1875).
Texas. Militia.
Subjects:
Governors--Texas.
Indians of North America--Wars--Texas.
Pardon--Texas.
Frontier and pioneer life--Texas.
Places:
Mexican-American Border Region.
Mexico--Relations--Texas.
Texas--Politics and government.
Texas--Officials and employees--Selection and appointment.
Texas--Relations--Mexico.
Document Types:
Correspondence--Texas.
Proclamations--Texas.
Petitions--Texas.
Reports--Texas.
Letterpress copybooks--Texas.

Related Material

The following materials are offered as possible sources of further information on the agencies and subjects covered by the records. The listing is not exhaustive.

Texas State Archives
Texas Secretary of State executive record books, 1835-1917, 15.18 cubic ft. (originals), 14 reels of microfilm (duplicates)
Governor Richard Coke resignation, December 1, 1876, 1 item [negative photostat]
Texas Secretary of State election registers (a.k.a. appointment registers), 1837-2007, 32.15 cubic ft. (originals), 36 reels microfilm (duplicates)
Texas Secretary of State bonds and oaths, 1837-1844, 1846-1920, 73.91 cubic ft., 3 reels microfilm (duplicates)
Texas Secretary of State executive clemency records, 1840, 1845-2009, 111.18 cubic ft., 166 reels of microfilm (originals), 21 reels of microfilme (duplicates)
The Texas Collection and University Archives, Baylor University
Richard Coke Papers, 1828-1964, undated, bulk 1852-1957, undated, 3.5 linear ft. (6 document boxes)

Administrative Information

Preferred Citation

(Identify the item), Texas Governor Richard Coke records. Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.

Accession Information

Accession number: 2014/123

No accession information for these records was located. An accession number was assigned for control purposes on June 24, 2014.

Processing Information

Processed by State Archives staff, June 1984

Corrections and further encoding to TARO project standards by Tonia J. Wood, December 1995, March 2001

Finding aid converted from EAD 1.0 to 2002 by TARO using the conversion stylesheet v1to02.xsl, July 22, 2003

Refoldering, rehousing, and DACS-compliance by Aditi Worcester, May 2014

Folder-level description, corrections, and DACS-compliance by Tiffany Criswell, May 2018


Detailed Description of the Records

Governor Richard Coke records, 1873-1877,
2.5 cubic ft.

Box Folder
2014/123-1 1. Correspondence, February 1873
[Records include a letter from a Bastrop County citizen applying to be notary public.]
2. Correspondence, October 1873
[Records include Nagocdoches County district court meeting proceedings concerning Supreme Court judge nominations and recommendations of the bar and two letters from Galveston requesting John J. Best be reinstated as branch pilot as he was removed from office due to "Radical Politics" and "Political Prejudice."]
3. Correspondence, November 1873
[Records include letters nominating Henry Marshall Elmore for state penitentiary inspector from John L. Henry and Oran Milo Roberts.]
4. Correspondence, December 1873
[Records include a letter from A.B. Chamberlin of Galveston asking to be superintendent of the state insane asylum; a letter from A.B. Chamberlin to W.L. Woody asking for his support and to give his application to Governor Coke; a letter from J.W. Johnson reporting election results for Colorado County justice of the peace; letters nominating Mr. Robinson of Walker County for state penitentiary inspector; and a letter from Clay County residents nominating a land commissioner after a resignation.]
5. Correspondence, January 1874
[Records include six letters requesting J.W. Ferris of Waxahachie be nominated for the Supreme Court; seven telegraphs to David Browning Culberson regarding a Supreme Court confirmation for Judge Crawford; a letter from S.R. Goodale of New York hoping to be a commissioner of Texas deeds; resignations from McLennan County Sheriff P. McClelland, Angelina County justice of the peace and notary public James McKnights, and a Giddings notary public; a letter asking for Palo Pinto County cattle thieves to be pardoned due to their families needing their support; two letters, one from D.B. Culberson, nominating William Patton Saufley as state penitentiary inspector; a letter from R.S. Walker of Galveston applying to be a Supreme Court apprentice; two letters, from John F. Fisken and James Kept Holland, nominating Henry M. Elmore for state penitentiary supervisor; letters from A. Faulkner and Henry Marshall Elmore applying to be state penitentiary inspector; letters from legislators asking for John Ireland and Thomas Jefferson Devine to be nominated to the Supreme Court; a letter from E.P. Phillips inquiring about a clerkship in the governor's office; a letter from Grimes County Treasurer-elect William H. Taylor reporting that the former treasurer refuses to cede his office with a letter supporting his claim; a letter from Samuel Bell Maxey recommending James K.P. Campbell for state penitentiary inspector; a letter asking Governor Coke to meet with Zachariah Sable; a letter requesting Zachariah Sable be reinstated as a Galveston bar pilot; two letters reporting the death of Tarrant County clerk Ernest Hambert and regarding his estate in France; a letter reporting Fort Bend County election results; a letter from Henry C. Jacobs regarding Fort Griffin land commissioners and citizens living on land to be sold; a letter from Galveston bar pilots hoping to be reappointed; a letter from O.F. Bailey requesting a renewal as Pass Cavallo bar branch pilot; a letter from Mr. Breneman asking to be appointed Eagle Pass district judge and regarding petitions to remove District Judge Thornton; and a letter from Austin lawyers regarding land in Travis County.]
6. Correspondence, February 1874
[Records include a letter reporting Jasper County Sheriff W.F. Ferguson's election after Sheriff H.C. Ruse's resignation; a letter from C.B. Raines regarding claims against the state; a letter from district judge applicant Mr. Breneman regarding martial law and the resignation or removal of Judge Thornton; resignations from Travis County notary public C.R. Johns, Jr., an Austin County notary public and justice of the peace, and state geologist John W. Glenn; a letter from J.W. Jennings applying to be land commissioner in Grayson County; a letter from Colorado County Justice of the Peace Eugene Himly's doctor reporting that Himly will be unable to continue serving due to being severely wounded; a letter from Eugene Himly regarding his election being contested by Governor Edmund Jackson Davis, who claimed the election was unconstitutional; a letter from Francis Williams accepting his commission as Fort Bend County justice of the peace; a letter from T.J. Brown of Sherman nominating Russell De Armond to replace Judge Andrews in the 11th Judicial District if Andrews resigns; a letter from G.W. Todd of Mason regarding Sheriff elect John Clark being unable to perform his duties due to Sheriff J.J. Finney's refusal to cede office; a letter reporting Colorado County election results; a letter from El Paso County Treasurer Ward B. Blanchard announcing his election; and letters from the McKinney bar hoping for Judge Andrews's resignation and petitioning for R. De Armond to be appointed district judge.]
7. Correspondence, March 1874
[Records include a letter from N.O. Green regarding the 24th district judge seat and nominating John A. Cocke to replace Judge Thornton; a letter from J.A. Cocke asking to be appointed judge if J.J. Thornton resigns or is removed; forwarded resignations from Brown County surveyor H.B. Tarver and Anderson County Justice of the Peace Z. Horn; a letter announcing Tarver's replacement V.P. Burns; a letter from J.M. Stinnett of Grayson County hoping to be land commissioner after his cotton farm was destroyed by fire; a letter announcing R.O. Davidson's election as bookkeeper and treasurer of the state lunatic asylum; a letter from Galveston bar pilot commissioners announcing a new pilot; a letter from Charles Fowler of the Galveston bar and the British B.K. Engineers protesting the intoxicated behavior of pilot B.F. Heitman; a resignation from Harrison County Justice of the Peace J.R. Ford; a letter from Hugo Lehmann of the Texas German Gazette asking to print German materials for the state; a letter from members of the House Finance Committee; a letter from prison inspector J.K.P. Campbell regarding possible fraud involving prisoner transportation and Sheriff Bugg of Hays County; a letter from Guy Morrison Bryan reporting Judge Henry Massey's removal from the 22th district by a vote in a joint session of the House; and a letter from William Fitzhugh applying to be land commissioner in Collier County.]
8. Correspondence, April 1874
[Records include a receipt from Stephen H. Darden; a letter from J. Class regarding power of attorney to attend to an orphan; resignations from an Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas commissioner and a Harris County notary public; a letter from Port of Brazos de Santiago branch pilots wishing to be reappointed; a letter from Governor Coke to State Treasurer A.J. Dorn, enclosing a comptroller's warrant for printing and engraving bonds; two letters, one from Guy Morrison Bryan, regarding the removal of Judge S.B. Newcomb from the 5th district; a letter from T.M. Scott applying for land commissioner in Collier County; a letter from James Turner nominating Judge Ector for Harrison County district judge; a letter from C.B. Raines of Palo Pinto County regarding reimbursement of funds; a letter asking for a passport and special travel letter for Reverend Adolph Snigurski so he can visit his family in Poland; a letter from the Bandera County district court stating that Snigurski appeared, renounced Russian allegiance, and stated his intent to become a U.S. citizen; a letter from Fannin County residents nominating land commissioners; a letter from Charles Fowler nominating J.B. Sabel for Galveston branch pilot; land commissioner nominations for Cook, Grayson, and Montague County from Robert Bean, George Robertson Reeves, and others; nominations for land commissioners in Lamar County; and a forwarded letter to William R. Friend requesting a quarantine due to yellow fever in Cuero.]
9. Correspondence, May 1874
[Records include a protest from the Houston and Texas Central Railway treasurer regarding labor and billing; a letter from B.J. Tompkins applying for Parker County land commissioner; letters nominating Daniel Sisk and Henry Williamson for Parker County land commissioner; a letter from Governor Coke to the Farmers Loan and Trust Company in New York City with instructions to deliver Texas bonds to W.L. Moody; a letter nominating land commissioners in Comanche County; a character reference letter for German printer Hugo Lehmann; a forwarded list of indictments against Thomas and Wiley Wright; letters and a petition nominating R.H. Burns as Montague County land commissioner; letters from Galveston regarding confusion over elections and pilot commissioner terms in the wake of Governor Davis leaving office; a letter from R.H. Donald nominating Denton County land commissioners; certificates from Coke appointing L. Best and R. Jamison Galveston branch pilots; a letter from W.T.F. Coles applying to be Lamar County land commissioner; a letter from Charles Fowler nominating Louis Best for Galveston branch pilot; a letter from S.P. Ford asking to be Comanche County land commissioner; letters, one from George Bibb Pickett, nominating Wise County land commissioners; a protest from Governor Davis-appointed Superintendent of the Texas Bureau of Immigration Gustav Loeffler regarding the constitutionality of his shortened term; and a letter from Guy M. Bryan announcing Samuel Bell Maxey's election to the United States Senate.]
10. Correspondence, June 1874
[Records include a letter from Goliad attorney Charles Roberts with a petition requesting counties west of the San Antonio River be declared frontier counties as "human life is at present unsafe and the fears of the people are well founded"; a letter from Henry King nominating Louis von Hagen of Gillespie County for a frontier protection force; a letter from Parker County citizens nominating J. Jones for land commissioner; resignations from a Gregg County district court clerk and the Blanco inspector of animals and hides; petitions from Jackson, McLennan, and Palo Pinto County citizens nominating land commissioners; letters from Judge Barksdale in Dallas requesting special judges for cases he is disqualified from hearing; a letter from Gregg County Judge J.D. Campbell with a list of local resignations; nomination letters for Bowie County notaries public and a Sabine Pass branch pilot; a letter from Texarkana citizens requesting the reappointment of notaries public; a letter from District Attorney J.G. McDonald asking for indictments against and larger rewards for two murderers in Grimes County; a letter from T.B. Raulkin requesting help due to bands of outlaws in Madison County; letters regarding Secretary of State Alfred Wesley De Berry, Bandera County District Court Clerk Charles Montague, and a passport application for Rev. Adolph Snigurski; letters and translated papers from William H. Russell of Brownsville regarding border difficulties with Mexico; a letter from J.E. McCloud nominating land commissioners for Grayson County; a letter from Joseph Vincent Massey inquiring about San Augustine County land commissioner nominations; and a letter from David Browning Culberson nominating a Bowie County notary public.]
11-1. Correspondence, July 1874
[folder 1 of 2]
[Records include a letter from 17th District Judge Daniel D. Claiborne regarding violence near Goliad and asking which counties have had arms restrictions suspended; a federal Internal Revenue Service statement for "taxes assessed against the Penitentiary of the State of Texas"; a letter regarding license renewals for Pass Cavallo pilots; a resignation from Gregg County Justice of the Peace J.D. Campbell; petitions from Denton and Eastland County citizens nominating land commissioners; a letter from J.D. Stephens nominating land commissioners for Comanche County; correspondence regarding Palo Pinto County Judge A.J. Hood and indictments against U.S. soldiers for cattle theft; a letter from state geologist Samuel Botsford Buckley regarding his salary; a letter from Ohio state librarians regarding a forwarded set of reports and laws; and letters from A. Fitzgerald and J.J. Peatts of Fort Worth requesting protection for their copper and metal mines in Haskell County.]
11-2. Correspondence, July 1874
[folder 2 of 2]
[Records include a letter from Richard B. Semple regarding Thomas Ragsdale retrieving fugitives from Missouri; a petition from Palo Pinto County citizens nominating land commissioners; letters from Waco citizens hoping to raise a volunteer company of soldiers for protection; a letter from Frank Spencer of Galveston requesting the Harris County district court clerk retain his position; a letter from James Freeman of San Marcos regarding power of attorney; a letter from Dan H. Triplett regarding Abner Chenoweth's pardon; a letter from Marcellus E. Kleburg nominating an Austin County land commissioner; a letter from J.W. Colbert of Decatur inquiring if citizens may organize a volunteer company for frontier defense; a letter from Grimes County District Attorney J. McDonald regarding the capture of and reward for outlaw Allen Wilkerson and his possible connections to other crimes; a letter from William R. McDermett asking permission to raise a ranger company to protect Palo Pinto County; a letter from John S. Phelps of the Dallas sheriff's office informing Governor Coke he has been requisitioned by the governor of Missouri for the arrest of William Mitchell; and a letter from T.J. Bates of Denton County requesting frontier protection.]
12-1. Correspondence, August 1874
[folder 1 of 4]
[Records include a letter regarding an oath of office by telegraph needed for a Houston court to open on time; a letter from James Q. Chenoweth nominating Fannin County land commissioners; a letter from San Saba County citizens asking for protection; a letter from E. Dawson of Clay County asking to raise a company for frontier defense; nominations for land commissioners in Eastland County; a letter from J.E. Foster regarding some misplaced papers; a letter from Coleman County citizens worried their taxes might go to Brown County; a letter from Ed G. Bower of Dallas thanking Governor Coke for retrieving fugitive William Mitchell from Missouri; a letter from Richard Montgomery Gano's brother F.M. Gano nominating himself as captain for a frontier protection company; a letter from J.H. Baker regarding laws "attacking" Shackleford County; a letter from 29th District Attorney Thomas Davidson regarding the reward for Daniel Goins, charged with murdering William Neese; a letter from C.C. Freeland and Waco citizens requesting school lands be resurveyed and inquiring about families already settled on them; and a letter from Joseph Morris nominating land commissioners for Hunt County.]
12-2. Correspondence, August 1874
[folder 2 of 4]
[Records include a letter regarding raising a company for frontier defense; a letter from J.H. Barken of Palo Pinto County regarding "the change of county lines"; a letter nominating land commissioners in Austin County; a letter from Christopher Columbus Augur thanking Coke for releasing soldiers arrested for killing cattle; a letter from William F. Egan of Denton asking the governor to forward a requisition to Thomas E. German who is traveling to Oswego, Kansas; a letter from George M. Belcher about a failure to take oaths; a letter from Bryan law office Page & Sims regarding the murder of a freedman; a letter from W.F. Egan asking for a requisition on the governor of Kansas for Birdwell Morris and Lafayette Casey, who are charged with the murder of John B. Hickman; a letter from John S. Ford of Brownsville regarding a local commissioner's term of service; a letter from John S. Dunn of Tarrant County hoping to be surgeon for a frontier regiment; a letter from the state comptroller listing checks and bond sales; a letter from Sam Evans nominating Tarrant County land commissioners; and a letter from Richard B. Hubbard regarding his trip to St. Louis and the state of the country.]
12-3. Correspondence, August 1874
[folder 3 of 4]
[Records include a mimeograph copy of R.B. Hubbard's letter regarding the state of the country and his trip to St. Louis ("Everywhere north and west your Administration is being looked to as the salvation of Texas"); a letter from "Comanche Charlie" of Huntsville Station asking Governor Coke if he wants any "Indian fighters"; a letter nominating Red River County land commissioners; a letter from W.H. Cobbs applying to be McLennan County land commissioner; a letter from McLennan County residents, including Nicholas William Battle, nominating land commissioners; a petition from Parker County residents nominating land commissioners; a letter from Weatherford residents asking for a public weigher of cotton with a note from Coke that he has no authority to appoint someone to this position; a letter from lawyers Hellman & Gans thanking Coke for pardoning Albert Michaels; and a letter from O.F. Bailey requesting renewal as Pass Cavallo bar branch pilot.]
12-4. Correspondence, August 1874
[folder 4 of 4]
[Records include a letter from John F. Wilkins regarding the appraisal of school lands; a letter from Clarksville District Attorney M.L. Sims asking for a reward and enclosing an indictment against William and Nathaniel Bagwell of Red River County for the murder of John R. Robbins; a letter from J. Robert Brown nominating Brown County land commissioners; a letter from William H. Brown applying to be Grayson County land commissioner; a petition from H. Roberts of Limestone County nominating land commissioners; a triplicate warrant for "proceeds of sale of Bonds under Act to provide money to pay the floating indebtedness of the State"; a letter from Treasurer Andrew Dorn reporting check amounts from bond sales; and a resignation from a Camp County justice of the peace.]
13-1. Correspondence, September 1874
[folder 1 of 2]
[Records include a letter from David Holderman regarding the murder of his son Thomas and asking for a larger reward for Brown Bowen who "was broken out of jail by the John Wesley Hardin Party and is now at large and beyond the Limits of the State of Texas" with a note from Coke saying he can raise the reward to $600; a resignation from Gonzalez County animal and hide inspector J.B. Wells; a letter nominating Palo Pinto County land commissioners; a letter requesting a land commissioner change in Tarrant County; a letter from H. Teichmüller regarding L.E. Kellner's removal from the General Land Office; financial statements from New York regarding "indebtedness of the State of Texas"; a letter from the General Land Office inquiring about Lamar County land commissioner appointments; a letter from Ohio State Librarian Walter Hood stating that he has sent reports regarding laws and common schools; a letter from New York real estate broker C.A. Wells hoping to organize a bureau for Texas settlement; a letter from Aaron S. Mangum of Sherman regarding power of attorney for an ailing friend; and a letter from Dallas attorney E.G. Bower enclosing copies of indictments and asking for a requisition on the governor of Missouri.]
13-2. Correspondence, September 1874
[folder 2 of 2]
[Records include a letter from Charles Fowler of Galveston reporting Moody's resignation as pilot commissioner and nominating a replacement; a letter regarding a name correction for a Grayson County land commissioner; resignations from the Bastrop County animal and hide inspector, Fannin County land commissioner B.F. Hayes, and Senator John Lafayette Camp; a letter from a Grayson County land commissioner accepting his position; a letter from Collin County Sheriff W.W. Merrit regarding John T. Morris, "the man who killed Reed the Stage Robber," and the reward for Reed; a letter from Houston Judge James Masterson regarding locating the Montgomery County seat; a letter from J.S. Perrin of Alabama regarding the reward for Thomas J. Russell with a note from Secretary De Berry stating there is no record of a reward for this person; a letter from Belton attorney James Boyd regarding the description of a fugitive; a letter from William H. Russell of Brownsville regarding the timing of the general election and the term of office for the inspector of animals and hides; a letter from San Antonio merchants regarding citizens starting the new county of McMullen; a letter from G.W. Williams accepting his land commissioner position in Montague County; a triplicate warrant for bond sales and a list of checks from State Treasurer Andrew Dorn; and two nomination letters for C.L. Pitcher for Bowie County notary public with a note from Coke stating he cannot make appointments until the senate is back in session.]
14. Correspondence, October 1874
[Records include resignations from Marion County Justice of the Peace H.H. English and a Henderson County justice of the peace; a triplicate warrant for "Proceeds of sale of Bonds under an act to provide for payment of floating indebtedness of the State"; a list of checks from Treasurer Dorn; memoranda from Williams & Guoin and from William Lewis Moody in New York regarding Texas debts and bond sales; a letter regarding Eastland County land commissioner appointments; a letter from Uvalde County citizens requesting a notary public; petitions from Hamilton, Polk, and Shackleford County citizens nominating land commissioners; a letter from Judge Barksdale in Dallas requesting a special judge be appointed to hear a case he is disqualified from hearing; a letter from an Orange citizen hoping for someone to be appointed Orange County river inspector; and a letter from R. Burns accepting a land commissioner position in Montague County.]
Box Folder
2014/123-2 15. Correspondence, November 1874
[Records include a letter from State Treasurer Andrew Dorn regarding a fiscal year report; a letter from Bowie County residents requesting and nominating a notary public; a letter from Limestone County animal and hide inspector elect H.H. Young regarding confusion over term limits for the incumbent; a letter from John C. Robertson and W.S. Herndon recommending Col. H.M. Elmore for state penitentiary inspector; a recommendation for a Bowie County notary public; a resignation from a Leon County notary public with a nomination for his replacement; a protest from the Houston and Texas Central Railway Company treasurer regarding the company's financial relationship with the state; and a letter from James H. Calhoun of Eastland County inquiring about land commissioner appointments.]
16. Correspondence, December 1874
[Records include a petition from Palo Pinto County citizens nominating land commissioners after their original commissioners were disqualified; letters from Grayson County citizens nominating William A. Wells to replace land commissioner William H. (W.H.) Bean; a resignation from Grayson County land commissioner W.H. Bean; a letter from Charles Fowler of Galveston inquiring about a lack of commissions for branch pilot; a letter from the Council of Foreign Bondholders in London asking for "a copy of the latest report of the Secretary of the Treasury to the Legislature of the State"; a resignation from Montague County Justice of the Peace John S. Love due to hardships in carrying out duties in an area with many vacancies; a letter from Bowie County residents asking for and nominating a notary public with a note from Coke stating the appointment cannot be made until the legislature is back in session; a contract with John D. Elliott for printing services with the state; a letter regarding indictments for parties with pending cases in Uvalde County and asking for a requisition on the governor of Kansas; and an indictment of G.W. Wall for murder in Uvalde County.]
17. Proclamations, February 1874
[Records include a proclamation by Governor Coke that an election will "be held on Monday the 2nd day of March AD 1874 for the election of a district attorney for the 14th Judicial District, composed of the Counties of Dallas, Tarrant, and Ellis."]
18. Proclamations, April 1874
[Records include a proclamation naming McCulloch & Co. Bankers in London, England, "agents for the State of Texas" and a proclamation regarding public school teachers seeking compensation for their work.]
19. Proclamations, May 1874
[Records include a proclamation announcing an election on June 2, 1874, for a new 25th district attorney after Charles H. Howard's resignation; a proclamation naming Trinity Station the temporary Trinity County seat until a permanent seat is selected on June 2, 1874; a proclamation providing "for the safe keeping of the furniture and fixtures belonging to the public halls of the Capitol, the Public Library, and to provide for the improvement of the Capitol grounds and State cemetery," and appointing Frederick Voight to fill this office; and a proclamation appointing J.A. Carroll of Denton special judge for the 12th Judicial District due to Judge Lindsay being "disqualified under Article 5, Section 11, of the State Constitution."]
20. Proclamations, June 1874
[Records include a statement from Governor Coke declaring Charles Louis Wurzbach a United States and Texas citizen; proclamations naming special judges for the 14th district for cases 1479, 1597, and 1607 since Judge Barksdale "is disqualified under Article 5, Section 11, of the State Constitution" from trying these cases; a redacted proclamation giving Wiley Thompson "full power to superintend, contract for and control the opening and clearing out of the said Sabine, Neches and Angelina Rivers and Pine Island Bayou" due to "An Act to improve the navigation of the Sabine, Neches and Angelina Rivers and Pine Island Bayou"; a proclamation naming Andrew Smyth of Jasper County to the aforementioned position; a proclamation naming an Ellis County special judge to hear a case involving the Texas Comptroller of Public Accounts and the International Railroad Company; and a proclamation appointing William Russell to inspect and report on the Corpus Christi canal.]
21. Miscellaneous, undated
[Records include letters from congressmen requesting Thomas J. Devine be nominated to the Supreme Court; a letter from R.B. Hubbard and others nominating Henry H. Dodge for a position as the governor's clerk; a letter from the Fort Worth bar requesting Hon J.W. Ferris of Waxahachie be nominated for the Supreme Court; a petition from Harris citizens recommending William B. Wood of Montgomery County for state penitentiary inspector; petitions from Ysleta citizens requesting a commission for ditch construction "to encourage irrigation in El Paso County" and nominating commissioners; a letter from Menard County citizens nominating a judge from Gillespie County to fill a vacancy; a petition from Democratic party leaders nominating William Patton Saufley for state penitentiary inspector; a letter from 24th Judicial District residents nominating Cassius Breneman to replace Judge J.J. Thornton if he resigns due to health troubles; two letters from Bowie County residents hoping to be notaries public; a letter from Bowie County citizens nominating W.C. Belcher for notary public; and a nomination list for notaries, pilots, and pilot commissioners for Galveston.]
22. Correspondence, January 1875
[Records include a resignation from Limestone County notary public Christopher Terrell nominating Hugh H. Young as his replacement; a letter from Treasurer Dorn regarding a payment from a special revenue account to a state revenue account; a letter from Charles Stewart of Houston nominating Harris County land commissioners; resignations from Clay County land commissioner W. Fletcher, a Travis County notary public, Tarrant County notary public T.J. Ross, and a Grayson County notary public; a letter from a Bowie County citizen applying to be notary public; a resignation from Bell County notary public Don A. Chamberlin nominating J.B.B. Supple as his replacement; a letter from Oran Milo Roberts regarding his opinions on Supreme Court matters; and a letter from the Bonham bar requesting a member of their organization be appointed judge if the legislature creates a criminal court in Bonham.]
23. Correspondence, February 1875
[Records include a letter from a Denton County deputy sheriff asking for a requisition on the governor of Arkansas for William Akes; a letter from Frederick Voight regarding Brush & White of Austin's winning contract bid for "piping and appropriate fixtures to introduce gas light in the Capitol buildings and grounds and the Executive Mansion"; resignations from Camp County Justice of the Peace W.R. Barnes, a Wilson County notary public, and the Hardin justice of the peace; a letter from Sherman attorney T.J. Brown recommending Mr. Chenoweth as judge for the new criminal court in Bonham; a letter from William H. Russell nominating Webb County land commissioners; a letter from House members nominating commissioners "to contract with parties to clean out the Neches River from Wiess Bluff to Bunns Bluff" with a note from Governor Coke that the secretary of state will appoint Pinkney Samuel Watts; a letter from G.T. Bonner of New York City regarding the specifics of Texas "Bonded Indebtedness"; a letter from Hill County Sheriff John P. Cox asking for a requisition to retrieve Jon A. Purnell; letters from W.S. Coleman and J.H. Van Hook of Marshall protesting the possible appointment of James Turner as criminal judge; a letter from Grayson County surveyor Samuel Bonham protesting poor work done by land commissioners in his area; a letter from H.W. Nelson of Sulphur Springs reporting that state police agent James Wheat murdered teenager Ebenezar Davis and asking on behalf of the community for a reward, with a note from Coke saying he can offer $200; a letter nominating a Waco land commissioner; a letter from William H. Russell nominating Kinney County land commissioners; a letter from T.J. Campbell of Jefferson hoping to be district judge; and a letter from Ysleta commissioners reporting they have completed a ditch according to the dimensions of "An Act to encourage irrigation in El Paso County" and asking for an inspector to certify their work.]
24. Correspondence, March 1875
[Records include a letter regarding pension debt from Comptroller of Public Accounts Stephen H. Darden; a letter from Juan Armendariz of Socorro regarding ditch inspection in Ysleta; a letter from District Attorney James Boyd of Comanche asking for a reward for two murderers at large; a letter from T.J. Campbell of Jefferson applying to be district criminal court judge; a letter from a Medina County district court clerk regarding indictments against Alexander Hay and asking for a requisition on the governor of Kansas; a letter recommending John R. Diamond for Grayson County land commissioner; two letters from Denton County Sheriff W.F. Egan regarding indictments for murder and asking for requisitions on the governor of Arkansas; a letter to W.H. Russell from Edinburg Sheriff Alexander Leo asking for state troop support and regarding an inquest into two men (J.F. Fulton and Mauricio Villanneva) who were murdered "by a band of six Mexicans who came from Mexico for no other object but to kill these two men"; a copy of the indictment for Fulton and Villanneva's murder from the Hidalgo County trial; a letter from Edinburg Sheriff Alexander Leo regarding lawlessness and depredation on the border and informing Coke that the men murdered in Hidalgo County were the local justice of the peace and the deputy inspector of hides and animals; a letter from William Steele of the adjutant general's office regarding border troubles and asking for militia reinforcement from the state and from the president due to the "state of war upon the people of Texas"; a letter from S. Young of Hill County regarding an indictment against Jon A. Purnell and asking for a requisition on the governor of Missouri; five letters, one from Louis Cardis, regarding the ditches being constructed in El Paso County; a letter from a Galveston resident applying to become inspector of streams; a letter nominating Young County land commissioners; a letter from Bryan attorneys regarding the lack of notaries public in their area; a letter from J.S. Woods of Rockwell County regarding a name correction needed for a notary public; a letter from the Kaufman County sheriff asking for a requisition on the governor of Louisiana for John M. Taylor; a resignation from a Bowie County justice of the peace; and a Spanish language letter from the mayor's office in New Laredo, with an English translation, informing Coke that Mexican citizens sent a party into Texas to seek justice against "savages" and asking for permission to enter Texas again "when they are in pursuit of the savages who may cross the river in their retreat" and asking for "reciprocity when operating against the common enemy."]
25. Correspondence, April 1875
[Records include a letter from James A. Ware of Rio Grande City regarding bandit tracking and border troubles; a letter from a Laredo resident regarding eight thieves arrested by Mexican authorities; a letter from A.S. Carothers of Saltillo, Mexico, regarding "the raiding party that were committing depredations near Corpus Christi in the latter part of March" and a conversation with General Escobedo; a letter from William H. Russell regarding the whereabouts of Mexican outlaws in Nueces County; a letter from the a 15th District Court judge reporting that his court is nonfunctional due to the death of the court clerk and "the recent raid by Mexicans on Carrizo, the county seat of Zapata County, and the brutal murder by them of D.D. Lovell," the presiding justice and requesting Zapata County "be attached for judicial purposes to the County of Webb"; a letter nominating a Clay County land commissioner to replace a commissioner that resigned; a letter from John White of Collier County inquiring about the appointment of a justice of the peace for his area; petitions from Angelina and Hamilton County citizens nominating land commissioners; a resignation from McLennan County Justice of the Peace R.A. Dyer; a letter from Samuel Bonham nominating replacements for Grayson County land commissioners who refused their commissions; letters from John P. Randolph and from Waco attorney John L. Dyer applying to be McLennan County land commissioners; a letter from Freestone County Sheriff James Robinson regarding a petition for the pardon of Huntsville prisoner H.T. Martin, as well as an indictment against J.F. Graham, alias Bill Grimes, for the murder of Henry Lamb and a requisition on the governor of Louisiana; and a Spanish language letter from a San Ignacio resident regarding border troubles in Zapata County.]
26-1. Correspondence, May 1875
[folder 1 of 4]
[Records include a certificate appointing Napoleon Smith Fannin County land commissioner; two letters from Houston and Texas Central Railway Company treasurer F.A. Rice protesting financial arrangements with the state; three recommendations for Dr. D. Port Smyth for chemistry chair at the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas; a letter from a Young County district court clerk regarding a name correction needed for a land commissioner; a letter from Thomas A. Dwyer applying to be the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas president; a letter from Hamilton Fish from the state department in Washington, D.C. regarding printing costs; a letter regarding ditch construction in El Paso County; an extract of a letter from William Tecumseh Sherman to Edward Otho Cresap (E.O.C.) Ord regarding border troubles and diplomatic relations with the Mexican government; and a letter from E.O.C. Ord regarding border troubles and advice from General Sherman.]
26-2. Correspondence, May 1875
[folder 2 of 4]
[Records include a letter from E.O.C. Ord asking for border reinforcements to keep citizens safe and for the governor to inform the president that "Texas has been invaded by armed bands of Mexicans who plunder and murder her people"; a letter from William Steele regarding Mexican raids and Leander McNelly raising his company of Texas Rangers to 75 members; two letters from Brownsville attorney William H. Russell regarding the reward for Juan Juarez, alias Flores, "the Swift murderer"; a letter from attorney B.B. Seat regarding his client constable George F.B. (G.F.B.) Vega's claim on the award for Juan Juarez; Spanish language certificates and English translations signed by Juan N. Cortina, Manuel Treviño, and Manuel de la Garza stating that G.F.B. Vega apprehended Juan Juarez and is entitled to the reward; a letter from Cameron County Sheriff James G. Browne supporting G.F.B. Vega's claim for the reward on Juan Juarez; a letter from James Nance regarding documentation on his Milam County land; a letter supporting Nance's claim on his land; and a letter from General Land Office commissioner J.J. Groos stating he can comply with Nance's request for documentation.]
26-3. Correspondence, May 1875
[folder 3 of 4]
[Records include resignations from Marion County Justice of the Peace William F. Wilson and Brown County surveyor S.P. Burns; a letter from a Waco district attorney enclosing letters from Limestone County Justice of the Peace J.P. Brown regarding the complaints of English immigrant John D.; a letter to the Waco district attorney regarding a disagreement between John D. and local J.P. Johnson; an affidavit filed by John D. claiming that J.P. Johnson committed aggravated assault and battery upon him; a letter from David Guthrie applying to be Galveston port branch pilot; two letters from Geo. F. Graham of Washington, D.C., asking to be a commissioner of Texas deeds; a letter from William R. Friend nominating DeWitt County land commissioners; a letter from D. Port Smythe applying to be chemistry chair at the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas; a letter from attorney Charles Shackleford of Bloomington, Illinois, regarding Texas's pre- and post-war financial state and "carpet bag rule"; and a letter from V. Wiess of Beaumont regarding commissioners to improve navigation.]
26-4. Correspondence, May 1875
[folder 4 of 4]
[Records include seven recommendations for D. Port Smythe for an Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas chemistry professorship; a letter from Jefferson citizens nominating Henry C. Hynson inspector to improve navigation on the Cypress Bayou; a letter from Chris C. Callan hoping to be 26th district judge after J.N. Everett's resignation; a letter from Bush & White to Frederick Voight regarding work costs at the governor's mansion; a letter from J.R. Waller of Erath County inquiring if a judge can move a court and if someone named J.A. Aston was ever elected governor; a letter detailing ditch construction in El Paso; and a letter from James P. Hague regarding the ditches being built in El Paso.]
27-1. Correspondence, June 1875
[folder 1 of 2]
[Records include a printing receipt from the Waco Daily Reporter; a letter from Marshall Sheriff S. Russell regarding the convicted murder John Angell and asking for a requisition on the governor of Arkansas; two letters from D.A. Bland of Round Rock applying to be an Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas professor; resignations from San Jacinto County Justice of the Peace William Manuel, Dallas County Justice of the Peace H.L. Bennett, Camp County Justice of the Peace B. Abernathy, precinct 4 Justice of the Peace W.P. Hancock, and precinct 3 Justice of the Peace Stephen Ward; letters recommending J.A. Palton and J.E. Christian for Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas professorships; letters from Comptroller Stephen Darden regarding bond sales and revenue; a document from associate justice Robert S. Gould regarding charges brought against a sheriff; a petition from Hunt County residents asking for a postponement in the sale of university lands that have been settled; a letter from C.H. Gould of Lincoln, Nebraska, regarding telegraphs from Caldwell County Sheriff A.A. Ellison and a requisition on Governor Coke; and a letter from Denton Sheriff W.F. Egan asking for a requisition on the governor of Missouri for two wanted thieves.]
27-2. Correspondence, June 1875
[folder 2 of 2]
[Records include a letter from Austin County residents regarding a German citizen's murder in Austin County and help in capturing Joshua H. Davis and Nathan Whitley; resignations from Marion County Justice of the Peace D.S. Warner and Grimes County Sheriff J.M. Gibbs; a report from Comptroller Stephen Darden about Davis administration bonds overseen by William & Guoin in New York; a letter from Alfred W. Perry of New Orleans applying for a chemistry professorship at the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas; a letter from Belton attorney Henry M. Furman asking for a reward to be offered for a murderer in Bell County and for help retrieving the wanted man from Tennessee; a letter from J.A. Aston regarding his election; a letter from Comptroller Stephen Darden regarding bonds and revenue; a resignation from Hill County notary public W.C. Howard with a nomination for his replacement; a letter regarding Grimes County Sheriff J.M. Gibbs's resignation; copies of letters and telegraphs from Edward Otho Cresap Ord asking the governor to call in troops under John Porter Hatch to defend border residents against raiders; a newspaper clipping regarding border disputes that resulted in raiders killing two soldiers; a letter from Arkansas resident Alvin Beaty asking for authority to arrest a wanted murderer; a petition from Menard County citizens nominating Chris C. Callan to replace Judge Everett after his resignation; letters from Saul McKinney regarding professorship positions at the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas; a letter from Parker County Judge A.J. Hood listing cases he is disqualified to hear; a letter from printer J.K. Street regarding printing costs and his press being burned; a letter from Chris C. Callan applying to replace Judge Everett as Fredericksburg district judge; a letter from D. Port Smythe applying for an Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas professorship, with three letters of support; and a report from 24th District Judge J.A. Ware regarding difficulties between citizens and soldiers in Starr County and charges brought against Lieutenant French, three soldiers, and Col. Edward Hatch of the 9th U.S. Cavalry.]
28-1. Correspondence, August 1875
[folder 1 of 2]
[Records include a letter from the Ysleta sheriff informing Governor Coke that Louis Cardis has started to organize a company of Texas Rangers, with a note from Coke stating that no authority has been granted to raise a company in El Paso County; a protest from Charles Howard of San Elizario regarding El Paso County mail service being reduced to once a week; a letter from Louis Cardis protesting acceptance of ditches in El Paso; a letter from a Farmersville resident asking for a reward to be offered for a murderer in Collier County; a letter from J.D. Wallace accepting an appointment; a letter from a Fort Griffin district court clerk regarding the lack of land commissioners appointed in Shackleford County; a report from Oran Milo Roberts detailing the business of the Texas Supreme Court from December 1873 to June 1875 as requested by Coke; an indictment against Joshua H. Davis and Nathan Whitley and a letter from the Austin County Sheriff asking for a reward; a petition from Burnet residents asking for a proclamation to prevent carrying deadly weapons in their area; and a petition from citizens of DeWitt County reporting that Christian Gerehardt was murdered by a desperado named Damien Rays and asking for a reward.]
28-2. Correspondence, August 1875
[folder 2 of 2]
[Records include a letter from Johnson County citizens reporting an attempted bank robbery in Cleburne and asking for rewards for M.A. Spurgeon and John Ferguson; a letter from Dallas County Sheriff James E. Barkley regarding an indictment against James Wilson for the murder of E.C. Liveley; a letter from E.B. Turner of Georgetown "in regard to six shooter law"; a letter from J.M. Harper of Stephenville asking for help in apprehending Joseph Kee; a letter from Galveston attorney W.P. Ballinger inquiring about election costs; a letter from W. Fort Smith asking for a special judge to be appointed to try Alex Wilson for murder in Brazoria County; a letter from Palo Pinto attorney J. Caruthers asking to raise a company to protect citizens, with a note from Coke that he did not authorize a Palo Pinto company; a letter from Lewis M. Lovejoy of Jacksboro nominating Sweetwater Creek area land commissioners; a letter from Seguin attorney J.M. Holmsley protesting the pardon of A. Francis of Bexar County; a letter from a Waco resident hoping to be appointed to the constitutional convention; a letter from Henry Eustace McCulloch of Seguin regarding commissions; a letter from Galveston attorney W.P. Ballinger inquiring about rail tariffs and rules; a letter from R.H. Langston regarding a requisition on Coke from the governor of Missouri for a wanted man hiding in Brown County; a letter from Galveston Chamber of Commerce president A.M. Hobby regarding imports; a letter from Comptroller Stephen Darden asking for a statement of settlement with Williams & Guoin; a letter to A. De Berry from Cleburne attorney W. Bledsoe regarding a special judge appointment for the 13th district; and two letters from Corpus Christi merchant J.B. Mitchell nominating branch pilot commissioners and Aransas Pass pilots.]
Box Folder
2014/123-3 29-1. Correspondence, September 1875
[folder 1 of 2]
[Records include a newspaper clipping regarding the McLennan County trial of Charles Carrich for the murder of J.M. Turner; a letter from a Waco district attorney asking for a reward for Carrich; a letter from R.J. Swearingen of Corsicana regarding a pardon for his son James; a letter from Gustave Cook of Galveston hoping to be appointed to the Supreme Court after Thomas Devine's resignation; a letter from Samuel Bell Maxey in Paris, Texas, regarding delegates to the constitutional convention in St. Louis and the postmaster in Sherman; a letter from Thomas Smith in Tyler reporting on the progress of a railroad bed; a letter from Brenham attorney Seth Shepard acknowledging a pardon for Willis McIntyre; a letter from J.M. Goss applying to be the 29th district attorney; a resignation from Supreme Court justice Thomas J. Devine; a letter from J.D. Westcott reporting that Houston Sheriff Samuel Swann Ashe has gone in pursuit of former chief justice J.W. McDonald and asking for a reward; a letter from Superintendent of Public Education Orlando Newton Hollingsworth regarding a report of "operations of the Department of Education serving the scholastic year ending August 31st 1875"; a letter from Cass County Sheriff W.W. Williams asking for a requisition on the governor of Louisiana for F.W. Stokes; a recommendation for G.W. Turner for an Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas professorship; a letter from J.W. Lawrence regarding personal leave; a letter from J.M. Brandon of Galveston reporting a local notary public taking part in a duel; a letter from John J. Eakins accepting a Dallas public weigher commission; a letter from Rockport Mayor P.H. Terry acknowledging receipt of a quarantine proclamation by Governor Coke; and a letter from attorney J.W. Cartwright.]
29-2. Correspondence, September 1875
[folder 2 of 2]
[Records include a letter from J.H. Hutchins of Houston stating his area supports Coke; a letter from La Grange attorney R.H. Phelps thanking the governor in regard to a case; a resignation from Angelina County surveyor Calvin Vinson; a recommendation for J.E. Christian for an Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas professorship; a letter from State Treasurer A.J. Dorn regarding Fannin County university lands; an invitation to the Williamson County Agricultural Mechanical & Stock Association October fair; a letter regarding judicial districts; a letter regarding Collier County costs and land commissioners; a recommendation letter request for a potential commissioner of deeds; a letter from Charles H. Howard of San Elizario acknowledging a protest letter from Louis Cardis regarding ditch construction; a letter from Belton attorney James Boyd regarding an indictment and asking for a requisition on the governor of Kansas; a letter from Cass County Sheriff W.W. Williams sent from New Orleans regarding a requisition for F.W. Stokes causing controversy due to Stokes being named judge of Grant Parish by Louisiana governor Kellogg; a speech request from the Jefferson Fair Association; a letter from Kinney County Sheriff S.C. Crowell regarding a payment; a letter from Henry M. Holmes of Mason regarding "Mason troubles" and James Cheney's shooting; a letter from State Penitentiary Inspector J.K.P. Campbell regarding an error in a pardon for prisoner Isaac Moody; a letter from Galveston Judge Norman G. Kittrell accepting a commission as special judge for the murder case against Alexander Wilson in Brazoria County district court; a letter from a Galveston resident asking about E.K. Smith's application for an Agricultural and Mechanical College of professorship; a letter from Bonham attorney Charles D. Grace regarding the constitutional convention; a letter from George T. Vaughan of Linden regarding power of attorney; a letter from a Galveston citizen applying to be branch pilot; and a letter regarding an indictment for murder for James Smith and subpoenas for witnesses in Hunt County.]
30-1. Correspondence, October 1875
[folder 1 of 2]
[Records include an autograph request from a Marshall University student; a letter from James W. Clark of Presidio requesting inspection of local ditches; a letter from R.H. Walker of Bastrop County asking for special permission to carry a deadly weapon due to harassment, with a note from Governor Coke that he "cannot suspend the operation of the law"; a letter from John N. Henderson in Hot Springs, Arkansas, requesting a leave of absence from Texas; a telegram from W.W. Martin of New Braunfels regarding a change in commissioners; a letter from Cass County magistrate M.N. Himes withdrawing his resignation because "the man elected refused to qualify," with a note from Coke that he does not have the power to reinstate Himes and "the office is vacant"; a letter from Gray Rock resident Francis Hopkins asking for permission to carry a deadly weapon due to violence from Native Americans and outlaws in Titus County; a letter from Waco National Bank president William A. Fort inviting Coke and his family to Waco's annual fair; a letter from John Cardwell of the Democratic Stateman asking Governor Coke for a statement; receipts for shipments from Texarkana to Austin and Brenham from Texas Express Company; a letter from H.L. Bentley acknowledging receipt of and thanking Coke for the pardon of "Perry of Kaufman"; triplicate warrants from the state treasurer for the Permanent School Fund; a letter from Thomas Benton Greenwood of Palestine regarding the constitutional convention and frustration with political issues not being addressed; and a letter from Bowie County Sheriff J.B. Barkman regarding an indictment against T.G. Calhoun and asking for a requisition on the governor of Arkansas.]
30-2. Correspondence, October 1875
[folder 2 of 2]
[Records include a shipping receipt from the Texas Express Company, a letter from Waco Female College president Sam. P. Wright regarding a new student award named after Coke; a letter from J.F. Beall of Fort Worth applying to be a delegate to the St. Louis constitutional convention; a letter from W. Smith reporting that the sheriff of Brazoria County has been living in Austin for over a year; a letter from a Marshall citizen regarding the constitutional convention; a letter from Prairieville notary public P.M. Moorehouse asking to retain his position; a recommendation for G.M. Turner for an Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas professorship; a letter from John W. Daniel of Dallas regarding controversy at a public weighing; a letter from a Pass Cavallo pilot commissioner regarding a certificate destroyed in a storm; a letter from Galveston Chamber of Commerce president Alfred Marmaduke Hobby regarding convention delegates; a letter from Nicholas William Battle of Waco regarding Rev. Joseph Key; letters from Samuel Evans and Louis Cardis accepting their convention delegate appointments; and a letter from A.M. Hobby regarding storm damage, enclosing a report from James Sorley detailing "damage done on the Texas Coast by the Cyclone Sept. 16, 17, & 18."]
31. Correspondence, November 1875
[Records include a forwarded recommendation for G.W. Turner for an Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas professorship; a triplicate warrant from the state treasurer for the Permanent School Fund; a letter from Dr. J. Saunders reporting the quarantine being raised at the port in Sabine Pass; certificates naming Edgar Smith of Bryan and William Dunovant of Colorado County delegates to the St. Louis constitutional convention; a letter from Shackleford County surveyor G.A. Kirkland nominating land commissioners; and a letter from a Bell County educator applying to be the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas mathematics chair.]
32. Correspondence, December 1875
[Records include a letter from 25th District Judge Charles H. Howard regarding charges made to the secretary of state by a Mexican minister and extradition of wanted men in New Mexico; a letter from G.W. Turner applying to be Latin chair at the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas; a letter from James Smith's attorney J.A.B. Putnam asking why his pardoned client has not been released and reporting that staff at the state penitentiary in Huntsville will not respond to his correspondence; a letter from the Titus County sheriff regarding tax collection and sheriff duties and requesting a tax collector be appointed for his area; a letter from Titus County District Court Clerk I. Cherry asking for a tax collector to be appointed for his area; a letter from M.L. Sims regarding one "J.O." impersonating a U.S. Marshal, an indictment against him for kidnapping, and asking for a requisition on the governor of Arkansas; a letter from W.W. Spivy of Rusk County regarding a law requiring the election of a county treasurer and surveyor; a letter from Harry Stucky of Kentucky applying to be a commissioner of Texas deeds; and a recommendation for Harry Stucky from Kentucky governor James B. McCreary.]
33. Correspondence, undated
[Records include nominations for Polk County officers and a recommendation for J. Christian for an Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas mathematics professorship.]
34. Correspondence, January 1876
[Records include a letter from Clay County citizens nominating land commissioners and reporting that their local school lands are already settled; a letter from New York attorney Charles H. Hatch applying to be a commissioner of Texas deeds; letters from Hays and Rains County citizens regarding county election requirements under the new constitution; a letter from Charles Fowler and other Galveston pilot commissioners nominating James McDonald for branch pilot; a telegraph from W.W. Brady regarding the new constitution and inquiring if the law will allow two clerks for Wise County; and a letter from General Land Office commissioner J.J. Groos regarding a report of land office transactions "for the fiscal year ending Aug 31st 1875."]
35. Correspondence, February 1876
[Records include a letter from El Paso custom house secretary S.C. Slade regarding "articles of incorporation for the purpose of constructing a Canal from Harts Well to Fort Quitman in El Paso County"; a recommendation for an Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas professorship from William W. Lang; a telegram from Galveston Mayor Roger Lawson Fulton regarding a quarantine at the port; and a letter from William Lewis Moody recommending J. McDonald for Galveston branch pilot.]
36. Correspondence, March 1876
[Records include a letter from Aransas bar deputy pilot C.C. Heath regarding Texas navigation; a business card from New York attorney Thomas B. Clifford; a letter from State Penitentiary Inspector J.K.P. Campbell forwarding a letter from Governor Coke to penitentiary lessees Ward, Dewey, & Co.; a letter from Coke to lessees of the state penitentiary regarding Campbell's claims that the staff has not been paid in two months with a response from Ward, Dewey, & Co. stating they have not stopped paying staff; a letter from Ward, Dewey, & Co. regarding J.K.P. Campbell's wages being garnished; a letter from J.H. Bagby of Waco applying to be McLennan County public weigher; a letter from surgeon Maj. I.H. Stearns at the National Home for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers in Wisconsin urging Coke to build a Texas home for disabled Confederate soldiers; petitions from McCulloch and Hill County citizens nominating land commissioners; and a letter from C. Brooks of Hill County enclosing an indictment against John A. Purnell for embezzlement.]
37. Correspondence, April 1876
[Records include a letter from B.H. Winters of Karnes County asking for protection and reporting that a "mob party" forced his family out of their home; a letter from Nathan M. Buford of Dallas regarding laws in Dallas and Ellis County; a letter from Edward Mercer requesting renewal as Aransas Pass branch pilot; a letter from a Dallas resident hoping to be clerk for the local court of appeals; a letter from Washington attorney S.C. Mills applying for renewal as commissioner of Texas deeds; a letter from the Virginia Institution for the Deaf, Dumb, and Blind principal Charles D. McCoy regarding rumors about principal Jacob Van Nostrand's removal from the Texas Deaf and Dumb Asylum; a letter from Shelby County Treasurer J.M. Hairgrove regarding new legislation and duties; a letter from Virginia resident William L. Parker inquiring about Texas providing land to settle in the frontier; a letter from William Blake of the Smithsonian Institution regarding Texas sending mineral specimens to the museum; a letter from Julius Ochs of Knoxville, Tennessee, asking to be a commissioner of Texas deeds; a letter from C.A. Abercrombie of Phelps applying to be a state penitentiary inspector; a letter from Galveston attorney W.P. Ballinger regarding a court case; a letter from Crockett attorney D.A. Nunn regarding court jurisdiction; a letter regarding a payment to the Democratic Executive Committee; a letter from M. Kelley of Henderson regarding school board operations; a letter from Hamilton Biscoe Hillyer requesting Governor Coke meet with his father who is running for Senate chaplain; a letter from Z.W. Matthews of Bellville regarding a seal for the Austin County hide inspector; a letter from R.F. Mann of Eagle Pass regarding martial law, William Stone, and local corruption; a letter from W.B. Forde requesting W.W. Hazlewood be reappointed notary public; a letter from J.J. Wallace of Alabama requesting information about moving to Texas; a letter from W.J. Vaughn hoping to be inspector of the Agricultural and Mechanical Canal at Menardville; a letter from William W. King requesting a special judge appointment for a Wharton County theft case; a recommendation for an Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas professorship for George W. Turner from Henry P. Harvey; and a letter from D. Lubbock recommending a criminal court clerk for Houston.]
38. Correspondence, May 1876
[Records include a letter from Ysleta reporting completion of a ditch in El Paso County; a letter from D.A. Bland applying to be professor of Latin and Greek at the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas; a letter to W.W. Lang from Baylie Peyton of Nashville regarding a recommendation for the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas president; a letter from Rusk County residents asking Governor Coke to withhold R.W. Smith's commission due to a contested election; a letter from Limestone County Sheriff J.W. Love regarding an indictment on Asa Thomas; a letter from Edward T. Mercer of Rockport applying for renewal as Aransas bar branch pilot; a letter from Bowie County notary public H. Breusing requesting renewal; a pardon by Coke for M. Moses, with a note from Governor Hubbard that this status was revoked in May 1877; a letter from William B. Dana of New York regarding Texas geological and agricultural production and reports; a letter from a Hays County district court clerk acknowledging proclamation of a reward offered for Isaac Reynolds, wanted for shooting three mules; a requisition on Coke from Oxford, Mississippi, Sheriff J.W. McLeod for the arrest of L. McIntosh, indicted for murder; a letter from Bryan attorney John Henderson regarding an indictment and asking for a requisition on the governor of Louisiana; and a protest from Houston and Texas Central Railway Company treasurer F.A. Rice regarding financial arrangements with the state.]
39. Correspondence, June 1876
[Records include a letter from citizens of Brown County asking for guns to be banned in their county for public safety; a letter from Pennsylvania assistant state geologist Frederick Prime, Jr., asking for a copy of "The Second Annual Report of the Geol. Survey of Texas"; a letter from A.M. Carter of Carthage asking for a requisition on the "Chief Executive of the Indian Territory"; for the arrest of A.D. Irwin; a message from Frank S. Albright of Sherman regarding a requisition for John M. Robinson; a letter from Denison attorney J.S. Clifton regarding a requisition on Governor Coke from the governor of Arkansas; a letter from A. Blacker of El Paso reporting General Trias's capture of Chihuahua and the imprisonment of Governor Ángel Trías Ochoa and other state officials; a letter from B. Bragg of Galveston accepting a commission; a letter from Austin attorney A.S. Walker accepting a special judge appointment; and a letter nominating Brazoria County land commissioners.]
40. Correspondence, July 1876
[Records include a letter from Corsicana attorney Bryan T. Barry nominating Navarro County land commissioners; a letter from B.M. Burks of McCulloch County regarding a county surveyor not qualifying for office in time; letters nominating San Saba County land commissioners; a letter from Stephens County Judge E.L. Walker nominating land commissioners; a letter from Pass Cavallo bar branch pilot Alex McCoppin applying for renewal; and a letter regarding Oran Milo Roberts and Jerome Boneparte Robertson.]
41. Correspondence, August 1876
[Records include a letter from Hays County Judge Sterling Fisher reporting an attempt to burn the San Marcos courthouse and asking for a reward to be offered; a letter from Matagorda County commissioners reporting on the clearing of Caney Creek; a letter from H.R. Lindsay of Comanche protesting the reward offered for William Stone due to suspected "collusion between Stone and the parties claiming the reward"; a letter from Pass Cavallo bar branch pilot Alex McCoppin applying for renewal; a letter from Stephens County Judge E.L. Walker nominating land commissioners; a letter from Jefferson County Justice of the Peace and notary public elect Samuel Harper inquiring why he has not received his commission; a resignation from T. Lynch Hamilton as a commissioner to improve navigation on Oyster Creek with a nomination for Thomas Stratton as a replacement; a letter from senator Leigh Chalmers confirming the appointment of Valentine Overton King as Commissioner of Insurance; a letter from Rusk regarding John T. Wiggins's attempts to remove R.W. Smith as tax assessor for Cherokee County; a letter from Governor Coke to Alfred Wesley De Berry listing his objections to Senate Bill 372, an "Act to confer additional jurisdiction upon the County Courts of Caldwell, Colorado, Lavaca, Gonzales, Comanche, Fort Bend, Grimes, Delta, Harrison and Wharton Counties"; a letter from Van Zandt County clerk W.A. Williams regarding a justice of the peace retracting his resignation and refusing to hand over books; a letter from Dillard Barron of Rusk regarding the conflict between John T. Wiggins and R.W. "Yank" Smith; a certificate regarding the contested election of R.W. Smith from the Cherokee County district court clerk; a court document awarding compensation to John T. Wiggins; and a letter from Matthew Roach and Lampasas County citizens protesting the creation of Burnett County out of part of Lampasas County.]
42. Correspondence, September 1876
[Records include a letter from J.R. Coffin's wife regarding her husband becoming Houston public weigher despite losing part of his right hand; a note from Governor Coke to the sheriff of Hunt County regarding a $200 reward; a letter from a Coleman County resident nominating land commissioners; an oath from Department of Insurance, Statistics, and History clerk Robert Josselyn; a letter from B.F. Church of Calvert regarding new legislation and teachers getting back pay for January to August 1876; a petition from Stephens County residents nominating land commissioners; a letter from Alex McCoppin hoping to be renewed as Pass Cavallo bar branch pilot; a letter from Galveston health officer Dr. W.F. Blunt regarding a quarantine against New Orleans due to an outbreak of yellow fever; a letter from A.M. Lea of Corsicana applying to replace Mr. Bragg as state inspector of railways, with a recommendation from Stephen H. Darden and a note from Coke stating this position does not exist; and a resignation from Assistant Attorney General Anderson James Peeler.]
43. Correspondence, October 1876
[Records include a letter from J.W. Cave of Houston regarding cargo at Algiers and port quarantines in Texas; court documents regarding a contested judgeship and the case of James Price Hague vs. Allen Blacker in El Paso County; a letter from A. Blacker regarding his election being contested by J.P. Hague; a letter from El Paso County District Court Clerk G.W. Wall regarding the court transcript for the Hague and Blacker case as required by "An Act regulating contested Elections"; a letter from a Limestone County attorney regarding an indictment and asking for a requisition on the governor of Missouri for Andrew Carver, who was wanted for cattle theft in Limestone County but sent to Missouri on a murder charge; a letter from attorneys Hopkins & Glenn of Atlanta regarding a requisition on Governor Coke for John Wallace; a letter from Houston attorney C. Anson Jones regarding rescheduling an election; a letter from M.G. Anderson of San Antonio asking for a reward for Cesario Menchaca for murder in Bexar County; a letter and report from assistant inspector J.T. Gaines on the state penitentiary in Huntsville; a letter from attorney general Hannibal Honestus Boone asking for a requisition on the governor of Louisiana; and a letter from a Galveston commissioner reporting his inspection of the Bernard River.]
44. Correspondence, November 1876
[Records include a protest from Houston and Texas Central Railway Company treasurer F.A. Rice regarding financial arrangements with the state and "An Act for the relief of the Houston and Texas Central Railway Company" and a resignation from Charles Shannon West from the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas board of directors.]
45. Correspondence, December 1876, October-December 1877
[Records include Richard Coke's resignation from state governorship, dated Dec. 1, 1876; a letter to Coke from Governor Hubbard regarding Texas's finances, defense budget, and official borders; a certificate naming Stephen H. Darden agent for the state to settle financial matters with the U.S. government and collect money due, signed by Secretary of State Isham Green Searcy, including a list of debts owed amounting to $404,498.00 for supplies, salaries, protection of the frontier, and more; a statement from I.G. Searcy verifying the list of amounts Texas paid for frontier defense made by Comptroller Stephen H. Darden; a statement from Governor Hubbard naming Stephen H. Darden agent of the state to represent Texas in discussions with U.S. government officials to set official borders for the state; and letters regarding a murder in Mason County and a petition for the Llano sheriff to receive the reward.]
46. Correspondence, 1876
[Records include a proclamation by Governor Coke listing 38 issues brought before the 15th Texas Legislature that were not resolved before the end of the session and authorizing county judges to perform the duties of chief and presiding justices regarding these issues. The list includes enacting laws regarding vagrancy, worker protection, imprisonment, taxation, estate settlement, the "wearing of arms," legal guardianship for children and insane persons, gambling, public teacher wages, legal fees, corporations, impeachment, and general elections. Coke concludes by calling for a special session.]
47. Messages and proclamations, December 1876
[Records include a proclamation by Governor Coke ceding governorship, records, and archives to Lieutenant Governor R.B. Hubbard.]
48. Messages and proclamations, undated
[Records include a copy of an Edmund Jackson Davis affidavit regarding claims of Pedro Jose de la Garza's heirs; a list of cases Dallas Judge Barksdale is disqualified from hearing; two petitions nominating William Jeff Maltby as senior captain of a frontier protection regiment; a letter from Thomas J. Brown nominating land commissioners in Collier, Cook, and Grayson County; and citizen petitions nominating land commissioners for Bowie, Erath, Grayson, Hood, Johnson, Lampasas, Montague, Parker, and Tarrant County.]
49. Messages, January 1874
[Records include a newspaper clipping of an open letter to Governor Coke urging him to remove Judge John Patterson Osterhout from the 34th Judicial District on account of incompetence and neglect; a financial report from William Steele of the Adjutant General's Office, at the governor's request, covering printing costs, frontier defense, and other issues, including a "List of Arms pertaining to the State of Texas in hands of Militia, State Guard, Minute Companies, Independent Companies and private parties," a list of "Minute Companies in Service of the State of Texas during the year 1873 and now," and a "Statement of Disbursements on account of Frontier Defense (Minute Men and Frontier Forces) Under provisions of Act approved November 25, 1871, and Acts approved June 2, 1873, to Decr. 31, 1873"; a message from Coke to the Senate and House asking for reports from heads of departments and committees so he can assess the state of the government—this message includes headings for frontier protection, the constitution, immigration, internal improvements, education, finance, insurance, elections, and legislation, with a request for a report on the amount of damage on the frontier since October 1, 1865, so Texas can present it to the federal government.]
Box Folder
2014/123-4 50. Messages, March 1874
[Records include a statement from Governor Coke regarding Congress's vote not to have a constitutional convention; a message from Coke to the Senate nominating judges for the 4th, 6th, 24th, and 28th districts; a note from Jon K. Dorman regarding copying; and a contract for public printing.]
51. Messages, undated
[Records include a document regarding constitutional amendments.]
52. Messages, 1875
[Records include five printed copies of "Message from the Governor of Texas to the Fourteenth Legislature, Second Session," (92 pages) from the Daily State Gazette Book and Job Office, 1875. The message has the following subject headings: Constitutional Convention, Enforcement of the Laws, Disturbances in DeWitt County, Public Charities, General Land Office, Frontier Defense, Mexican Border Troubles, Immigration, Public Printing, Public Education, State Finances, Veteran Pensions, County Finances, Claim of the International Railroad Company, Agricultural and Mechanical College, Public Buildings and Grounds, Geological Survey, State Department, Conclusion, and Appendix.]
53. Printed messages, 1875
[Records include eight printed copies of "Message from the Governor of Texas to the Fourteenth Legislature, Second Session."]
54. Printed messages, 1874-1876
[Records include one printed copy of "Message from the Governor of Texas to the Fourteenth Legislature, Second Session"; three printed copies of "Message from the Governor of Texas to the Fifteenth Legislature, First Session," (68 pages) from A.C. Gray, State Printer, 1876, with the following subject headings: Subject headings: Constitutional Amendments, Miscellaneous Legislation, Enforcement of the Laws, State Finances, General Land Office, Penitentiaries, Public Free Schools, Public Printing, Immigration Bureau, Indian Frontier, Rio Grande Border Troubles, Irrigation, Agricultural and Mechanical College, Public Property, Attorney General's Report, State Geologist, The Centennial Celebration, and Conclusion; one printed copy of "Mensaje del Governador de Texas a la Decima Quinta Legislatura," (72 pages) with statements from Luis de Tejada and Louis Cardis that the translation of the original manuscript is correct, with a list of erratas; one printed copy of "Message of Governor Coke, Vetoing the International Bond Bill. Sent to the Senate, March 6, 1875," (24 pages) from the State Gazette Book and Job Office; and one printed copy of "Inaugural Address of Governor Richard Coke: Also, Inaugural Address of Lieut. Gov. R.B. Hubbard: Delivered in the House of Representatives, January 15, 1874," (20 pages) from Cardwell & Walker, Printers.]
Letterpress, September 18, 1875-June 6, 1876
[Records include one bound letterpress draft copy of "Message from the Governor of Texas to the Fifteenth Legislature," 1876, with handwritten corrections, and one 493-page letterpress book of outgoing correspondence from Governor Coke and private secretary George T. Dashiell, including an alphabetized index, from September 18, 1875 to June 5, 1876.]
Box
2014/110-33 Telegrams, Davis-Coke, October 31, 1873-April 25, 1875
[Filed with Governor Edmund J. Davis' records.]
Letterpress, Davis-Coke, September, 1873-August, 1874
[Filed with Governor Edmund J. Davis' records.]
Box
2014/123-5 Letterpress, August 20, 1874-April 5, 1875
[Records include a 700-page letterpress book of outgoing correspondence from Governor Coke; Governor Richard B. Hubbard; and private secretaries George T. Dashiell, J.P. Martin, and John W. Swindells, with an alphabetized index, labeled "Coke - Hubbard June 7, 1876 - Jan. 18, 1877."]
Letterpress, April 2, 1875-September 16, 1875
[Records include a 570-page letterpress book of outgoing correspondence from Governor Coke and private secretary George T. Dashiell, with an alphabetized index, dated August 20, 1874, to April 5, 1875.]
Letterpress, Coke-Hubbard, June 7, 1876-January 18, 1877
[Records include a 497-page letterpress book of outgoing correspondence from Governor Coke and private secretary George T. Dashiell, with an alphabetized index, dated April 7 to September 16 1875.]