Texas Archival Resources Online

TABLE OF CONTENTS


Descriptive Summary

Biographical Note

Scope and Contents

Organization

Restrictions

Index Terms

Related Material

Separated Material

Administrative Information

Note to the Researcher

Additional Biographical Notes

Description of Series

Series I. William A. Philpott, Jr, Papers, 1936-1973, undated

Series II. Texas Bankers Association Records, 1885-1956

Series III. James Morgan Papers, 1830-1891, undated

Series IV. Other Personal Papers, 1633-1903, undated

Series V. Legal and Business Records, 1817-1944, undated

Series VI. Maps, Sketches, and Pamphlets, 1847-1953, undated

Series VII. Ephemera, 1832-approximately 1938

Series VIII. Original Numbered Folders, undated

University of Texas Arlington

William A. Philpott, Jr. Papers:

A Guide



Descriptive Summary

Creator: Philpott, William Albert, 1885-1971
Title: William A. Philpott, Jr. Papers:
Dates: 1633-1973
Dates (Bulk): 1835-1900
Abstract: Correspondence, legal documents, financial documents, court records, printed materials, ephemera, sketches, and maps.
Identification: AR507
Extent: 4 boxes and 1 oversize box (1.7 linear feet)
Language: Materials are in English.
Repository: Special Collections, The University of Texas at Arlington Library

Biographical Note

William Albert Philpott, Jr. (1885-1971), known as “Mr. Phil” to his colleagues in the Texas Bankers Association and as “Mr. Paper Money” to his friends in the American Numismatic Association, was born September 17, 1885, at St. Jo, Montague County, Texas. The eldest of four children of W.A. Philpott, Sr. and Mary R. Bellah Philpott, W.A. Philpott, Jr. graduated from high school in Bowie, Texas, and received a degree from the University of Texas at Austin. While at the University of Texas, Mr. Philpott was an accomplished gymnast, edited the campus daily newspaper (The Daily Texan), and started a humor magazine. He then went on to work as a reporter for the San Antonio Express and as night editor of the Austin Statesman. In about 1912, Mr. Philpott moved to Dallas to become editor of the Texas Bankers Association’s publication, The Texas Bankers Record. In 1916, Mr. Philpott took on the additional role of managing officer of the Texas Bankers Association when he became secretary of the organization. He continued to serve the Association in the roles of editor and secretary for nearly 50 years, until his retirement on January 1, 1964. After his retirement, Mr. Philpott served as a consultant for the Association.

Mr. Philpott married Mary Bachman of Austin in 1914. They had two sons; the first died at birth, and the second died the day after birth. Mary died in December 1922, two days after the death of their second son. Mr. Philpott did not remarry. In addition to devoting himself to his duties with the Texas Bankers Association, Mr. Philpott wrote several books of essays, including In Praise of Ignorance, and Other Random Essays, by Phil (Dallas: Egan Co., 1948), and became a prolific collector of currency and early Texana. T. Harry Gatton’s history of the Texas Bankers Association quoted an article from Coin World magazine that called Mr. Philpott “the dean of the paper money collectors,” and Gatton further wrote that Mr. Philpott “put together one of the finest collections of early Texas letters, manuscripts and historical documents anywhere.” (Gatton, 175) Mr. Philpott died at his home in Dallas on October 10, 1971, at the age of 86, after playing golf with friends.

The Texas Bankers Association, founded July 23, 1885, at Lampasas Springs, Texas, is the oldest bankers’ association in Texas. Its first president was James Francis Miller of Gonzales, a lawyer, banker, and United States Representative. An early goal of the Association was the repeal of Texas’ constitutional ban on the chartering of state banks; this goal was achieved with the approval of an amendment to the Texas Constitution in 1904. In 1912, the Association founded the first women’s bankers’ association in the United States — the Texas Women’s Bankers Association. The Texas Bankers Association also played an important role in the selection of Dallas over New Orleans as the location for a Federal Reserve Bank. And, from 1926 to 1964, the Texas Bankers Association sponsored the Dead Bank Robber reward program, which paid cash rewards to citizens who killed bank robbers during the course of robberies.

James Morgan (1787-1866) was a prominent early Texas businessman and land speculator. Born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, Morgan grew up and married in North Carolina. Around 1830, he came to Texas and decided to go into business there. He served as a delegate from Liberty to the Convention of 1832, which met at San Felipe de Austin and approved, but did not present to the Mexican government, a number of resolutions, including one for Texas statehood separate from Coahuila. In 1834, Morgan became the Texas agent for the New Washington Association, which had been formed in New York by investors who included Samuel Swartwout and Lorenzo de Zavala to establish a town on Galveston Bay at the mouth of the San Jacinto River. The site became known as Morgan’s Point. In 1835, Morgan hired workers in the United States for the settlement at New Washington and brought them to Texas in December aboard the Association’s schooners. During the Texas Revolution, Morgan served as commander of the Texian garrison on Galveston Island. After the Revolution, he built a home at the site of New Washington (which had been destroyed by the Mexican army just before the battle of San Jacinto) and continued to engage in land speculation, including the development of the town of Swartwout on the Trinity River. In the early 1840s, Morgan served as one of the commissioners of the Texas Navy. In the 1850’s, he was involved in promoting what later became the Houston Ship Channel. Morgan died at his home on March 1, 1866. According to the United States Supreme Court decision relating to his estate, Morgan owned 70,000 acres of Texas land at the time of his death, but one of his executors, H.F. Gillette, estimated the value of the land at only 25¢ per acre, which would amount to less than the debts owed by the estate.

Sources:

  • Census of the United States, 1900 (Series: T623; Roll: 1660; Page: 111).
  • Census of the United States, 1930 (Series: T626; Roll: 2314; Page 168).
  • Gatton, T. Harry. The Texas Bankers Association: The First Century, 1885-1985. Austin: Texas Bankers Association, 1984, at 12, 104, 117-118, 163, 170, 173-175.
  • Hudson, Weldon I. Johnson County, Texas, Marriage Records, 1854-1883, Volume II. Fort Worth: Weldon I. Hudson, 1982, at 9.
  • Labinski, Steve. Review of The Daily Texan: The First 100 Years. http://texana.texascooking.com/books/dec99edchoice.htm (accessed July 3, 2007).
  • “Mr. Phil Succumbs at Age 86.” Texas Bankers Record. October 1971, at 4-6.
  • “Mrs. Philpott Rites Set Today.” Dallas Morning News, November 3, 1944, Sec. II, p. 7.
  • “W.A. Philpott Dies at Home at Age of 85.” Dallas Morning News, May 27, 1942, Sec. II, p. 10.
  • Texas State Historical Association. Handbook of Texas Online, s.v. “Texas Bankers Association.” http://www.tsha.utexas.edu/handbook/online/articles/TT/cnt1.html (accessed July 3, 2007).
  • Allen v. Gillette, 127 U.S. 589 (1888).
  • Texas State Historical Association. Handbook of Texas Online, s.v. “Convention of 1832.” http://www.tsha.utexas.edu/handbook/online/articles/CC/mjc9.html (accessed August 14, 2007).
  • Texas State Historical Association. Handbook of Texas Online, s.v. “Morgan, James (1787-1866).” http://www.tsha.utexas.edu/handbook/online/articles/MM/fmo50.html (accessed June 20, 2007).
  • Texas State Historical Association. Handbook of Texas Online, s.v. “New Washington Association.” http://www.tsha.utexas.edu/handbook/online/articles/NN/ufn1.html (accessed August 14, 2007).

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Scope and Contents

The William A. Philpott, Jr. Collection, in three manuscript boxes, consists primarily of a portion of the extensive materials collected by William A. Philpott, Jr. over a period of approximately 50 years. Other materials in the collection include personal letters to Mr. Philpott, materials relating to the Texas Bankers Association, three photographs, and two catalogs of Mr. Philpott’s collection (one catalog without addenda and the other with addenda). Most of the materials in this collection relate to Texas, with the bulk of the materials dated between 1835 and 1900. Many of the materials relate to land transactions and other legal matters. The oldest document in the collection is a 1633 letter by Nicolas Briot, who was at the time the chief engraver of the English mint under King Charles I and had earlier served in the same position under King Louis XIII of France. The most recent document is the copy of the collection catalog, with the last addendum dated 1973.

The collection is arranged in seven series. The arrangement was determined by the archivists, as the collection did not have a consistent, developed organizational scheme when it was received by Special Collections.

The first series is the William A. Philpott, Jr. Papers. It includes personal letters to Mr. Philpott, catalogs of his collection, two portraits of Mr. Philpott, and one photograph of two adults and a child (perhaps Mr. Philpott and his parents). Correspondents include Texas politician Maury Maverick, popular Detroit-based poet Edgar A. Guest, and Texas historian and businessman James T. DeShields.

The second series is Texas Bankers Association Records. This series consists primarily of materials related to annual conventions of the Association, including the proceedings of the Association’s first convention held at Lampasas Springs, Texas, in 1885. Other conventions whose proceedings are included in this collection were held at El Paso in 1904 and Dallas in 1905 and 1911. Convention programs include the 1913 convention in Galveston, which includes the program for the first convention of the Texas Women’s Bankers Association. This series also includes notices and a poster relating to the Texas Bankers Association’s Dead Bank Robber reward program, under which the Association promised to pay cash rewards to citizens who killed bank robbers during the commission of holdups. The poster sets forth the rules as of January 1933 for payment of rewards.

The third series comprises about one-fourth of the collection and is the James Morgan Papers. The bulk of the series includes business papers such as legal documentation (agreements, deeds, mortgages, promissory notes, bonds, powers of attorney), correspondence (both to and from Morgan), receipts, and account statements relating to Morgan’s varied mercantile and land interests. It contains employment agreements made by Morgan in New York in 1835 to bring workers to the town of New Washington, Texas, which Morgan was developing on behalf of New York investors who included Samuel Swartwout and Lorenzo de Zavala. Included is Morgan’s employment agreement with Emily D. West, who has become identified with the legend of the “Yellow Rose of Texas.” The business papers also contain materials related to Morgan’s development of the town of Swartwout on the Trinity River, and documents relating to land ventures in which Morgan engaged with Jacob De Cordova. The second portion covers the is Commander of Texas Forces at Galveston, which contains two documents relating to Morgan’s service as the commander of the Texian garrison on Galveston Island during the Texas Revolution. One of the documents is a letter written by Morgan to several prominent figures of the Texas Revolution (including General Thomas Jefferson Rusk, John A. Wharton, and Mirabeau B. Lamar) asking whether they believe Morgan engaged in any misconduct while he was in command at Galveston. The series also contains personal correspondence and contains two 1861 letters from John J. Johnston, Jr. to Morgan relating personal news. The final portion of the series contains legal documentation (land surveys, deeds, promissory notes, agreement), court records, correspondence, invoices, and receipts relating to the administration of the estate of James Morgan following his death in 1866. Much of the material relates to disputes between H.F. Gillette, one of the executors of Morgan’s estate, and some of Morgan’s heirs. One of those disputes led to a lawsuit that was decided in Gillette’s favor by the United States Supreme Court, Allen v. Gillette, 127 U.S. 589 (1888), and includes correspondence between Gillette and his attorneys relating to the attorneys’ fees charged to Gillette in connection with that lawsuit.

The fourth series is Other Personal Papers and includes some personal papers, primarily correspondence, of the following: Antonio Lopez de Santa Anna, Nicolas Briot, Robert Carlisle and John Menefee (a letter from Carlisle to Menefee), Nathaniel Hart Davis, John A. Dix, H.F. Gillette (materials unrelated to his capacity as executor of Morgan’s estate), James Hiner, Sam Houston (a reprint, apparently from microfilm, of an 1815 letter by Houston regarding the uncertainty of his plans following the conclusion of the War of 1812), Ithamar Hubbell (Revolutionary War pension certificate), Samuel Bell Maxey, Samuel McCulloch, Sr. and Samuel McCulloch, Jr. (a promissory note made less than two weeks after the fall of the Alamo), Henry E. Shelley, James Smith, Noah Smithwick and his daughter Nancy (Nanna) Smithwick Donaldson (includes what appear to be notes of dictated memoirs, drafts, sketches, a leather wallet, and an embroidered bookmark), John Townsend, and Nahor Biggs Yard (honorable discharge in 1839 from the Galveston Company of Volunteers).

The fifth series is Legal and Business Records and is the largest in the collection. This series is arranged in five subseries. The first subseries is Austin County (Republic of Texas) Government Records and contains a bond signed by Sheriff McHenry Winburn upon taking office in 1839, as well as two 1839 reports from road commissioners. The second subseries is Business Records. This subseries includes letters from 1858-1878 to the Victoria, Texas, law firm of Glass & Callender and William S. Glass; an 1832 ledger showing sales by the San Felipe de Austin mercantile business of Huff & Veeder to an ayuntamiento (town council); an 1817 receipt from McKinne’s Commission Ware-House, Augusta (Georgia?), for seven bales of cotton; records (mortgages, letters, deeds, agreement, and receipt) relating to the Gonzales, Texas, law and banking firms of Miller & Sayers and their members from 1867-1905; land patents to, a deed from, and a letter from the Texan Emigration and Land Company of Louisville, Kentucky, in 1857-1858; and corporate documents of the Valley View Hospital and related entities, of Victoria, Texas, dated 1903 and 1905. The third subseries is Court Records. This subseries contains court records (bonds, a court order, a motion, and a writ) relating to lawsuits in courts of the Republic of Texas from 1838-1843. Early Texas settlers who appear in these records include Charles Chevallier, Horace Eggleston, Thomas Gay, George Huff, William Kuykendall, Noel Mixon, Richard Parmalee, Jesse Walling, and Nicholas Whitehead. The Court Records subseries also contains court records (administrator’s bond and oath, alias capias [essentially an arrest warrant], citation, court order, and documents relating to the probate of a will) relating to proceedings in courts of the state of Texas from 1859-1894, including an 1859 Administrator’s Bond and Oath by Alexis T. Rainey, who later was a Confederate regimental commander in the Civil War. The fourth subseries is Land Records. This subseries contains one 1836 receipt from the Ouachita, Louisiana, Land Office for a land payment from prominent Louisiana planter Jean Baptiste Prudhomme, Jr. The subseries also includes many records (Mexican grants, survey notes and maps, patents, deeds, mortgages, releases, bonds, indentures, correspondence, promissory notes, contracts, receipts, certificates, and a notice of sale) relating to land in Texas and dated from 1835-1944, with the bulk dated 1835-1900. These documents span the eras of Texas as part of the state of Coahuila y Texas, Republic of Mexico; the Republic of Texas; and the state of Texas. The documents relating to Texas land are arranged by the present-day counties where the land is located. More than 50 of the documents in this subseries relate to land in Mr. Philpott’s native Montague County (including a 1926 deed to longtime Fort Worth Star-Telegram publisher and philanthropist Amon G. Carter). Other present-day Texas counties represented in this subseries are Anderson, Bexar, Calhoun, Clay, Cooke, DeWitt, Gonzales, Gregg, Hardin, Harrison, Henderson, Hopkins, Houston, Jack, Lamar, Limestone, Robertson, Tyler, Victoria, Washington, Wharton, and Wise. This subseries contains documents relating to several land grants by George (Jorge) Antonio Nixon, who was land commissioner for the Joseph Vehlein, Lorenzo de Zavala, and David G. Burnet empresario grants, as well as several land patents signed by Texas governors, including H.R. Runnels, E.M. Pease, and Coke R. Stevenson. Other prominent Texans reflected in these land transactions include Haden Edwards, H.H. Edwards, George Littlefield, Charles S. Taylor, and George Washington Smyth. The fifth subseries of the Legal and Business Records series is Republic of Texas Public Debt. This subseries contains an 1839 stock certificate in the Consolidated Fund of Texas and a 100-pounds-sterling bond issued by the Republic of Texas in 1839 as part of a $5 million bond issue approved by the Congress of the Republic of Texas in 1838.

The sixth series is Maps, Sketches, and Pamphlets. This series includes an 1857 map of Texas and part of New Mexico, three booklets (The Valley of Alvardo, an 1847 poem; an 1856 speech by U.S. Representative Lemuel D. Evans of Texas; an 1889 promotional booklet about Lampasas Springs, Texas; and an 1890 city guide to Galveston, Texas), letters by Lenoir Hunt and his sister-in-law, Adele Breed (granddaughter of Civil War-era Texas Governor Francis Lubbock), relating to books, including a partial manuscript of Hunt’s 1938 history of Texas; two quarterly newsletters (1947 and 1953) of the Book Club of California; an undated color drawing of General Winfield Scott; and an undated print of a sketch of Military Plaza in San Antonio.

The seventh series is Ephemera. It contains an 1832 letter from a person named W.W. Pace to an unidentified recipient; a facsimile of William B. Travis’ February 24, 1836, letter from the Alamo (printed on paper stock from the Dallas Historical Society); a facsimile of an 1850 dinner menu from the St. Francis Hotel in San Francisco; several bank checks from the 1870s and 1907; two “Tarry Checks” issued by a warehouse in Wichita Falls, Texas, during the bank moratorium in March 1933; several cards apparently allowing admittance to lectures or courses at the University of Louisiana Medical Department during 1851-1857; a facsimile of an 1888 poster advertising excursions from Austin to Galveston on the Houston & Texas Central Railway; a 1908 membership certificate in the Brotherhood of American Yeomen; and a poster advertising the 1938 sale of the assets of the Texas Centennial Central Exposition in Dallas.

The William A. Philpott, Jr. Collection contains a wealth of information about early Texas and Texans. The many land-related documents in the collection reveal the variety and complexity of land transactions in which Texans engaged, particularly in the nineteenth century. These documents also provide substantial information about historical land values, both rural and urban, in Texas. The court documents provide insights into the operations of the Texas court system, particularly during the years of the Republic, and types of civil cases decided in that court system. The James Morgan Papers reveal the varied interests of an active businessman and land speculator and reflect the types of transactions that would occur during the process of developing new settlements in early Texas, as well as some of the problems encountered by developers of such settlements.

Oversize material can be found in box OS497.

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Organization

The William A. Philpott, Jr. Collection is arranged in seven series; one series are arranged in subseries.
  • Series I. William A. Philpott, Jr. Papers, 1936-1973, 0.15 linear feet (5 folders and 1 oversize item)
  • Series II. Texas Bankers Association Records, 1885-1956, 0.25 linear feet (9 folders and 1 oversize item)
  • Series III. James Morgan Papers, 1830-1891, 0.20 linear feet (18 folders and 1 oversize item)
  • Series IV. Other Personal Papers, 1633-1903, 0.15 linear feet (18 folders)
  • Series V. Legal and Business Records, 1817-1944, 0.43 linear feet (41 folders and 17 oversize items)
  • Series VI. Maps, Sketches, and Pamphlets, 1847-1953, 0.08 linear feet (9 folders)
  • Series VII. Ephemera, 1832-approximately 1938 0.04 linear feet (1 folder and 1 oversize item)
  • Series VIII. Original Numbered Folders, undated

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Restrictions

Access

Open for research.

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Index Terms

These materials are indexed under the following headings in the catalog of The University of Texas at Arlington Library. Researchers desiring materials about related topics, persons or places should search the catalog using these headings.
Persons
Philpott, William Albert, 1885-1971
Morgan, James, 1787-1866
West, Emily D., 1801-
Santa Anna, Antonio López de, 1794?-1876
Organizations
Texas Bankers Association
Texas Emigration and Land Company
Places
Galveston (Tex.)
Alternate Titles
Historical Manuscripts Collection

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Related Material

GA120: George Antonio Nixon Collection, contains maps, legal documentation, and correspondence relating to early Texas land grants and the holdings of George Antonio Nixon.

AR508: Jenkins Garrett, Jr. Papers, includes correspondence between Mr. Philpott and Mr. Garrett relating in part to Mr. Philpott’s collection of Texana.

“Philpott Texana Collection, 1844-1879.” at the Center for American History at the University of Texas at Austin.

“Texas Bankers Association Records, 1981-1984.” at the Center for American History at the University of Texas at Austin.

James Morgan Papers, 1809-1881 at the Galveston and Texas History Center of the Rosenberg Library.

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Separated Material

Photocopies of letters, blank sheets of paper, empty folders, and deteriorating plastic sleeves have been removed from the collection.

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Administrative Information

Provenance

Purchased from Wells Fargo Bank Texas, National Association, 2004.

The William A. Philpott, Jr. Collection was acquired by the University of Texas at Arlington from Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. with funds granted by the Summerlee Foundation of Dallas. The collection was received July 2, 2004, and was accessioned as number 2004-27. The following is a brief narrative of the Philpott Collection provenance. David M. Smith was a Houston businessman who acquired a collection of materials, including the William A. Philpott, Jr. Collection, from the estate of Mr. Philpott in the early 1970s. In the mid-1980s, Mr. Smith pledged the materials acquired from the Philpott estate to Allied Bank West (later First Interstate Bank) as collateral to secure debts owed to the bank. Part of the collection was auctioned in 1986 by the Altermann Art Gallery of Dallas to raise funds to pay toward Mr. Smith’s debts to the bank. The remainder of the collection remained pledged to the bank. Because the auction by Altermann Art Gallery did not raise sufficient funds to fully discharge Mr. Smith’s debts to the bank, the bank (then First Interstate Bank) foreclosed on the remaining materials in its possession in 1995 and became the owner of the materials. In 1996, First Interstate Bank became Wells Fargo Bank. Neither Mr. Smith nor the bank changed or altered the materials from the original Philpott folders.

Citation

William A. Philpott, Jr. Papers, AR507, Box Number, Folder Number, Special Collections, The University of Texas at Arlington Libraries.

Acquisition

Purchase, 2004.

Accessioned as number 2004-27

Processing Information

The collection was processed by and finding aid written by Dennis M. Conrad.

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Note to the Researcher

Several of these documents are fragile. Some have been photocopied onto acid-free paper and the originals placed in sleeves or encapsulated. Please do not remove any original documents from sleeves or encapsulation. Please use care when handling originals that are not in sleeves or encapsulated.

Each document received by the University of Texas at Arlington in a numbered folder or sleeve has been marked, in pencil, with the number of the folder or sleeve in which the document was received. The folder or sleeve number can be compared to the Philpott catalog and addenda.

Mr. Philpott’s catalog contains brief descriptions of the contents of the numbered folders in his collection. A few of those descriptions contain apparent errors. For example, the catalog description (folder 932) of the October 12, 1835, employment agreement between James Morgan and Hugh Fraser (spelled “Frasier” in the body of the agreement but apparently signed “Fraser”) says that Fraser became connected with Colonel Fannin and was executed with Fannin’s men at Goliad. Although a Hugh Fraser was at Goliad with Fannin and likely was executed, that Hugh Fraser appears already to have been in Texas and serving in Texas volunteer militia at the time the Morgan-Fraser employment agreement was made in New York in mid-October, 1835. Thus, it appears that the Hugh Fraser with whom Morgan made an employment agreement was not the same Hugh Fraser who was at Goliad with Fannin. Another example is the catalog description of the document in folder 942 as a “Note” to “Gordley and Bradwell.” It appears that this document is actually an agreement by which James Morgan engaged law partners Thomas J. Gazley and John Birdsall to provide legal representation in connection with a will. A few date discrepancies between the catalog and the documents also exist, as well as a couple of numbering discrepancies (for example, the catalog description of the contents of folder 1050 describes the contents of folder 1085, while the catalog description of folder 1085 describes the contents of folder 1050).

The arrangement of Texas land documents in Series V., Subseries D., is based on the present-day Texas counties where the land referenced in the documents is located, to the extent that information could be determined by the processing archivist. The General Land Office’s online Land Grant Database provided most of the information that was used to determine the location of land for which the documents did not show a county location on their faces. The database can be accessed at http://www.glo.state.tx.us/archives/findingaids.html.

The Handbook of Texas Online was referenced throughout the creation of this finding aid. It was accessed between June and August 2007.

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Additional Biographical Notes

Numerous significant historical figures are represented in this collection. Among them are the following:

Antonio Lopez de Santa Anna (1794-1876) — Mexican soldier and politician who served as president or dictator of Mexico at various times between 1833 and 1855. Santa Anna became a national hero in Mexico by defeating a Spanish invasion at Tampico in 1829. He became president of Mexico in 1833 and was president at the time of the Texas Revolution. He personally commanded the Mexican forces that defeated Col. Travis’ Texian garrison at the Alamo in March 1836; he also issued the order for the execution of the Texian forces under Col. Fannin who had surrendered at Goliad in March 1836. Santa Anna’s army was defeated, and he was captured, by General Sam Houston’s Texian army at the battle of San Jacinto in April 1836. After returning to Mexico by way of the United States, Santa Anna became dictator in 1841 but was overthrown and exiled in 1845. He once again returned to Mexico at the beginning of the U.S.-Mexican War and rallied Mexican resistance, but after the U.S. defeated his forces at Buena Vista and Cerro Gordo and captured Mexico City in 1847, Santa Anna once again went into exile. He returned to power in 1853 but again was exiled in 1855 after agreeing to the sale of Mexican territory to the United States known as the Gadsden Purchase. Santa Anna returned to Mexico for the last time in 1874 and remained until his death on June 21, 1876.

Nicolas Briot (1579-1646) — Chief engraver of the mint for King Louis XIII of France from approximately 1605-approximately 1625, who left France for England approximately 1625 and became chief engraver of the English and Scottish mints under King Charles I. Briot reportedly introduced to both France and England the process of striking coins using machinery. Previously, coins had been struck by hand using a hammer. An example of Briot’s work, a coronation medal for Charles I, is in the British Museum.

Jacob Raphael De Cordova (1808-1868) — Jamaican-born, English-educated printer, author, cartographer, businessman, and land speculator. In 1834, Jacob De Cordova and a brother founded the Kingston (Jamaica) Daily Gleaner newspaper, which ran for over 150 years. In 1836, Jacob De Cordova went to New Orleans and shipped supplies to Texas during the Texas Revolution. After the Revolution, he came to Texas and installed the members of the first Odd Fellows lodge outside the United States. After settling in Texas in 1839, he traveled and spoke extensively in the East and England and wrote books to encourage immigration to Texas. With his half-brother Phineas, Jacob De Cordova owned one of the largest land agencies ever in the Southwest and published two early Texas newspapers, the Texas Herald (also known as De Cordova’s Herald and Immigrant’s Guide) and the Southwestern American (published in Austin). With two other men, Jacob De Cordova laid out the town of Waco in 1848-1849. With Robert Creuzbaur, he compiled the 1849 Map of the State of Texas on which much of the later cartography of Texas was based. De Cordova Bend in the Brazos River in Hood County is named for him.

Nathaniel Hart Davis (1815-1893) — Kentucky-born, Alabama-reared lawyer who came to Texas in 1840, served as a member of the Somervell expedition against Mexico in 1842, and served as Montgomery County attorney, commissioner, and chief justice, as well as judge of 13th Judicial District (1867-1870).

Haden Edwards (1771-1849) / Haden Harrison Edwards (1812-1864) — Father and son, Virginia natives who immigrated to Texas in 1825 and settled at Nacogdoches. Haden Edwards was a son of U.S. Senator John Edwards of Kentucky. Haden Edwards provided financing to Stephen F. Austin and went to Mexico City with Austin in 1823. There, he participated in the discussions that led to the colonization laws of 1824 in Mexico City and 1825 in Saltillo. Edwards received an empresario grant to settle 800 families near Nacogdoches, but the Mexican government revoked his grant in 1826. Edwards subsequently led the Fredonian Rebellion in 1826 and was named leader of the short-lived Fredonian Republic. When Mexican troops were sent to put down the rebellion, Edwards fled to Louisiana in 1827. He returned to Texas during the Revolution and settled in Nacogdoches, where he died in 1849. Haden Harrison (H.H.) Edwards, son of Haden Edwards, served in the Texas Revolution at the siege of Bexar in December 1835. After the Revolution, he was the founder and first president of the Sabine Pass and East Texas Railway, a member of the first Congress of the Republic of Texas, a member of the first legislature of the state of Texas, and a member of the Secession Convention of 1861. H.H. Edwards died in Cincinnati in August 1865 while seeking financing for his railroad venture.

Henry Flavel Gillette (1816-1896) — Connecticut-born teacher and farmer who immigrated to Texas in 1839. Gillette was the first professor at Baylor University in Independence, Texas, in 1846. Later, he was one of the organizers of the Bayland Orphans’ Home in Houston and served as superintendent of that institution from 1867-1882. Gillette was one of three executors of the estate of James Morgan, the other two being George Ball of Galveston and Wm. H. N. Smith of Murfreesborough, North Carolina.

Glass & Callender / William Larrabee Callender (1815-1895) — Glass & Callender was an early law firm in Victoria, Texas. According to the Handbook of Texas Online, the firm “conducted the bulk of legal business in Victoria County for two decades after the Civil War.” William Larrabee Callender was born in Pennsylvania, admitted to the bar in Kentucky, and came to Victoria in 1856. In addition to his private law practice, Callender conducted the Victoria Male Academy and served as justice of the peace and district clerk.

Edgar Albert Guest (1881-1959) — Native of England who went to work for the Detroit Free Press as an office boy in 1895 and worked there for nearly 65 years. Guest became famous for his verses that appeared in the Free Press every day and were syndicated to over 250 other newspapers, published in 20 compilations, and recorded on phonograph records. Guest also hosted radio shows in the 1930s, appeared on television in the 1950s, and worked briefly for Universal Studios in Hollywood. In 1952, he was named Michigan’s first Poet Laureate.

James Hiner (?-1883) — Kentucky-born attorney and circuit-riding Methodist minister who came to Texas in 1847 (his grave marker at the Acton, Texas, cemetery gives the date as 1849). Hiner served as Deputy Clerk, District Clerk, and County Judge for Johnson County, Texas, during the period 1860-1871. After moving to Hood County in 1871, Hiner served as County Judge and Clerk of the County Court there, and he helped organize a Methodist school at Acton.

Sam Houston (1793-1863) — Commander of Texian army during the Texas Revolution, first elected president of the Republic of Texas, one of the first two United States Senators from Texas (served 1846-1859), governor of Texas from 1859-1861, governor of Tennessee from 1827-1829. Houston served in the United States army under Andrew Jackson during the War of 1812, was wounded at the battle of Horseshoe Bend in 1814, and resigned from the army in 1818.

Huff and Veeder / George Huff / Lewis L. VeederGeorge Huff (1781-approximately 1850) and Lewis L. Veeder (?-?) were merchants at San Felipe de Austin in the early 1830s. Huff was one of Stephen F. Austin’s Old Three Hundred settlers. Veeder was one of seven members of the Central Committee for safety and vigilance that called the Convention of 1833, which proposed a state constitution for Texas (Austin was imprisoned in Mexico City when he presented the proposed constitution to the Mexican government).

William P. Huff (?-?) — Son of George Huff. William P. Huff was one of the special commissioners appointed for Austin County to work with the traveling commissioners appointed under the January 1840 act of the Texas Congress to examine land titles and report to the General Land Office on which land certificates were genuine. He also was editor of the Richmond Recorder newspaper, as well as a geologist and paleontologist who discovered fossils such as mastodons and giant bison in Central Texas in the mid-1800s. His finds are now in the British Museum in London. He also went to California in an unsuccessful search for gold and left a 300,000-word journal of his experiences that represents one of the few accounts of the southern route to California.

George Washington Littlefield (1842-1920) — Merchant, cattle raiser, banker, and member of the Board of Regents of the University of Texas. Littlefield served with Terry’s Texas Rangers in the Civil War and later amassed significant ranch lands in Texas and New Mexico. He organized American National Bank in Austin in 1890 and served as its president until 1918, had the Littlefield Building built in Austin in 1910-1911, and owned the Driskill Hotel in Austin from 1895-1903. Littlefield established the Littlefield Fund for Southern History in 1914 to collect archival materials relating to southern history. The city of Littlefield, Texas, is named for him.

Samuel McCulloch, Jr. (1810-1893) — South Carolina-born free black who came to Texas with his family in 1835 and settled in Jackson County. McCulloch was considered the first Texan casualty of the Texas Revolution, having been wounded at Goliad in October 1835. But, after the Revolution, his petition for Texas citizenship and a headright grant of land was unsuccessful. The Congress did, however, exempt him from a law that required free blacks to leave the republic or be sold into slavery, and he ultimately received a bounty land grant for his military service during the Revolution.

Miller & Sayers / James Francis Miller (1832-1902) — Miller & Sayers operated a law firm and bank in Gonzales, Texas, following the Civil War. James Francis Miller was a Tennessee native who came to Texas in 1845, was admitted to the bar in 1854, and served with Terry’s Texas Rangers in the Civil War. Miller was the first president of the Texas Bankers Association and the first president of the Texas Live Stock Association. He was elected to the United States House of Representatives in 1883 and served two terms.

James Smith (1792-1855) — South Carolina-born planter, soldier, and politician who served as a lieutenant under Andrew Jackson at the battle of New Orleans. Smith came to Texas from Tennessee in 1835 and established a plantation at Nacogdoches. He raised troops and acquired arms for Texas in New York and Tennessee and served in the Texas army, rising to brigadier general by 1840. Smith was credited by Guy M. Bryan in 1873 with being the source of the Texas Lone Star emblem – the star reportedly was on a brass button on Smith’s overcoat and was cut off and used as a seal. Smith County, Texas, is named for him.

Noah Smithwick (1808-1899) — North Carolina native who came to Texas as a teenager in 1827 and worked as a smith at San Felipe de Austin. Around 1830, he was banished from the colony for aiding the escape of a friend who had killed an alcalde, and he spent the next several years in Louisiana and East Texas. He served in the Texan army during the Revolution. Later, he moved to Travis County and Williamson County and eventually owned a mill at Hickory Creek east of Marble Falls. A Unionist, Smithwick left Texas for California in 1861. In the 1890s, he dictated his memoirs to his daughter, Nancy (Nanna) Smithwick Donaldson; many of his stories were published as articles in newspapers, including the Dallas Morning News. After his death, his daughter edited some of his memoirs and had them published as The Evolution of a State, or Recollections of Old Texas Days.

George Washington Smyth (1803-1866) — North Carolina-born surveyor who came to Texas in 1830. Smyth was land commissioner at Nacogdoches in 1835, a signer of the Texas Declaration of Independence in 1836, a member of the commission to set the Texas-U.S. boundary in 1839, a delegate to the convention that drafted the Texas Constitution of 1845, the Commissioner of the Texas General Land Office from 1848-1852, a U.S. Representative from 1854-1856, and a delegate to the Texas Constitutional Convention of 1866. He died at Austin in February 1866 while attending the Convention.

Samuel Swartwout (1783-1856) — New York-born businessman and land speculator. In the early 1800s, Swartwout was involved with Aaron Burr in the Western Conspiracy to set up an empire in the Southwest and was among those arrested and charged with treason. Swartwout was freed by the U.S. Supreme Court in a decision by Chief Justice John Marshall that established that federal courts have jurisdiction to issue writs of habeas corpus to inquire into the basis for a person’s arrest. After serving in the War of 1812, Swartwout engaged in various business ventures, including land speculation in Texas. While serving as customs collector in New York City, he helped raise funds for Texas independence and, at his own expense, sent provisions to Texas and provided for repairs to ships of the Texas Navy.

Texan Emigration and Land Company — Company organized at Louisville, Kentucky, in October 1844 to promote and colonize Peters Colony, a North Texas empresario grant that had been made in 1841 by the Republic of Texas to a group of American and English investors led by William S. Peters. The attempts of the Texan Emigration and Land Company to settle the colony were plagued by disputes and litigation. Ultimately, enactments by the Texas Legislature, beginning in the early 1850s, were necessary to resolve the disputes and settle the land titles.

Emily D. West (?-?) — Resident of New Haven, Connecticut, who entered into a contract with James Morgan in New York in October 1835 to come to Texas to work at New Washington for one year. In early 1837, she applied for a passport that would allow her to return to the United States; a note from San Jacinto veteran Isaac Moreland to Texas Secretary of State Irion supported her application for a passport, said that she was a free woman who had come to Texas from New York with Col. James Morgan, and reported that she had lost her “free papers” at San Jacinto in April 1836. Emily D. West’s identification with the “Yellow Rose of Texas” legend arose from writings of journalists Francis X. Tolbert and Henderson Shuffler based on the following passage from page 108 of William Bollaert’s Texas, an edited publication of the journal of an Englishman who traveled in Texas in the 1840s: “The Battle of San Jacinto was probably lost to the Mexicans, owing to the influence of a Mulatto Girl (Emily) belonging to Colonel Morgan, who was closeted in the tent with General Santana at the time the cry was made ‘the enemy! they come! they come!’ and detained Santana so long, that order could not be restored readily again.”

Nahor Biggs Yard (1816-1889) — New Jersey-born soldier, businessman, and civic leader of Galveston who reportedly brought the first lawsuit in Galveston in 1838. Yard was elected to the first board of aldermen in Galveston in 1839 but resigned to join the Galveston Volunteers. After his discharge from the Volunteers, he operated a men’s clothing store in partnership with Jacob L. Briggs; was director and president of Galveston Gas Company from 1855-1879; was treasurer of the Galveston, Houston and Henderson Railroad Company from 1859-1860; was one of the incorporators of the Gulf, Colorado and Santa Fe Railway Company in 1873; and was one of the organizers of the Union Fire and Marine Insurance Company. From 1857-1879, Yard served as president of Galveston’s Howard Association, which helped to combat periodic outbreaks of yellow fever. He was appointed superintendent of Galveston County schools in 1853, and he helped organize Galveston’s Hook and Ladder Company No. 1, the first fire company in Texas. Yard served as a colonel in the First Regiment, First Brigade, Texas State Troops during the Civil War.

References

  • Allen v. Gillette, 127 U.S. 589 (1888).
  • “Baylor History, June 2004.” Baylor News Online. http://www.baylor.edu/bn/news.php?action=story&story=8024 (accessed August 15, 2007).
  • Garraty, John A., ed. Dictionary of American Biography, Supplement Six, 1956-1960. New York: Charles Scribner’s Sons, 1980, at 258-259.
  • Michigan Historical Center. “Michigan’s Poet Laureate.” Michigan History Online. http://www.michiganhistorymagazine.com/extra/guest/poet.html (accessed August 14, 2007).
  • Block, Viola. History of Johnson County and Surrounding Areas. Waco: Texian Press, 1970, at 10, 278.
  • Ewell, Thos. T. A History of Hood County, Texas. Granbury, Texas: The Granbury News, 1895, at 100-102, 121, 138.
  • Johnson County History Book Committee. The History of Johnson County, Texas. Dallas: Curtis Media Corporation, 1985, at 213.
  • Bugbee, Lester G. “The Old Three Hundred: A List of Settlers in Austin’s First Colony.” Quarterly of the Texas State Historical Association 1 (Oct. 1897): 108-117.
  • “San Felipe Constitution, 1832.” http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~larsonmorgan/Morgan/records/government%20records%20-%20Laws%20of%20Texas.html#SF-21 (accessed August 1, 2007).
  • Untitled excerpt from journal of William P. Huff. http://diarychannel.com/Diary.aspx?ID=80 (accessed August 1, 2007).
  • Ericson, Carolyn R., and Frances T. Ingmire. First Settlers of the Republic of Texas: Headright Land Grants Which Were Reported as Genuine and Legal by the Traveling Commissioners, January 1840. Volumes I and II. Nacogdoches, Texas: Ericson Books, and St. Louis: Ingmire Publications, 1982, at v.
  • Texas Parks and Wildlife Department. Untitled. http://www.tpwd.state.tx.us/learning/webcasts/huff/huff.phtml; http://www.tpwd.state.tx.us/learning/webcasts/huff/research.phtml; http://www.tpwd.state.tx.us/learning/webcasts/huff/diary.phtml (accessed August 1, 2007).
  • Smithwick, Noah. The Evolution of a State or Recollections of Old Texas Days. Edited by Alwyn Barr. Austin: W. Thomas Taylor, 1995, at x-xi.
  • Ex parte Bollman, 8 U.S. 75 (1807).
  • Crisp, James E. Untitled post dated April 20, 1998. http://www.tamu.edu/ccbn/dewitt/adp/central/warroom/warroom12.html (accessed July 3, 2007).
  • Dunn, Jeff. “One More Piece of the Puzzle: Emily West in Special Collections.” The Compass Rose. Vol. XIX, No. 1 (Spring 2005): 1, 8.
  • Hollon, W. Eugene, and Ruth Lapham Butler, eds. William Bollaert’s Texas. Norman, Oklahoma: University of Oklahoma Press, 1956, at 108.
  • The Handbook of Texas Online was referenced for these notes. Various web pages were accessed between June and August 2007.

Allen v. Gillette, 127 U.S. 589 (1888).
“Baylor History, June 2004.” Baylor News Online. http://www.baylor.edu/bn/news.php?action=story&story=8024 (accessed August 15, 2007).
Garraty, John A., ed. Dictionary of American Biography, Supplement Six, 1956-1960. New York: Charles Scribner’s Sons, 1980, at 258-259.
Michigan Historical Center. “Michigan’s Poet Laureate.” Michigan History Online. http://www.michiganhistorymagazine.com/extra/guest/poet.html (accessed August 14, 2007).
Block, Viola. History of Johnson County and Surrounding Areas. Waco: Texian Press, 1970, at 10, 278.
Ewell, Thos. T. A History of Hood County, Texas. Granbury, Texas: The Granbury News, 1895, at 100-102, 121, 138.
Johnson County History Book Committee. The History of Johnson County, Texas. Dallas: Curtis Media Corporation, 1985, at 213.
Bugbee, Lester G. “The Old Three Hundred: A List of Settlers in Austin’s First Colony.” Quarterly of the Texas State Historical Association 1 (Oct. 1897): 108-117.
“San Felipe Constitution, 1832.” http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~larsonmorgan/Morgan/records/government%20records%20-%20Laws%20of%20Texas.html#SF-21 (accessed August 1, 2007).
Untitled excerpt from journal of William P. Huff. http://diarychannel.com/Diary.aspx?ID=80 (accessed August 1, 2007).
Ericson, Carolyn R., and Frances T. Ingmire. First Settlers of the Republic of Texas: Headright Land Grants Which Were Reported as Genuine and Legal by the Traveling Commissioners, January 1840. Volumes I and II. Nacogdoches, Texas: Ericson Books, and St. Louis: Ingmire Publications, 1982, at v.
Texas Parks and Wildlife Department. Untitled. http://www.tpwd.state.tx.us/learning/webcasts/huff/huff.phtml; http://www.tpwd.state.tx.us/learning/webcasts/huff/research.phtml; http://www.tpwd.state.tx.us/learning/webcasts/huff/diary.phtml (accessed August 1, 2007).
Smithwick, Noah. The Evolution of a State or Recollections of Old Texas Days. Edited by Alwyn Barr. Austin: W. Thomas Taylor, 1995, at x-xi.
Ex parte Bollman, 8 U.S. 75 (1807).
Crisp, James E. Untitled post dated April 20, 1998. http://www.tamu.edu/ccbn/dewitt/adp/central/warroom/warroom12.html (accessed July 3, 2007).
Dunn, Jeff. “One More Piece of the Puzzle: Emily West in Special Collections.” The Compass Rose. Vol. XIX, No. 1 (Spring 2005): 1, 8.
Hollon, W. Eugene, and Ruth Lapham Butler, eds. William Bollaert’s Texas. Norman, Oklahoma: University of Oklahoma Press, 1956, at 108.
The Handbook of Texas Online was referenced for these notes. Various web pages were accessed between June and August 2007.

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Container List

Series I. William A. Philpott, Jr, Papers, 1936-1973, undated

Box Folder
1 1 Correspondence, 1936-1939
Personal letters to Mr. Philpott. Correspondents are James T. DeShields (Texas businessman, historian, author, and collector of manuscripts, pictures, and books relating to Texas history), Mrs. W.R. Potter (author of History of Montague County (Austin: E.L. Steck, undated)), Georgina Kendall Fellowes of San Antonio, and Forest H. Sweet of Battle Creek, Michigan (a dealer in historical documents). Also included is a 1936 sketch of the San Jacinto Memorial by Bernhard Wall with a handwritten inscription to Mr. Philpott.
2 Correspondence, 1940-1956, undated
Personal letters to Mr. Philpott. Correspondents are Edgar A. Guest (three letters and a golf scorecard), S.G. Reed of Houston (with some proof sheets for a chapter of Reed’s A History of the Texas Railroads), and Maury Maverick (a light-hearted letter about the “International Association of Rip-Snorters”). Maury Maverick (1895-1954) of San Antonio was a U.S. Representative (1935-1938), mayor of San Antonio (1939-1941), and chairman of the Smaller War Plants Corporation (1941-1946). This folder also contains an empty envelope addressed to Mr. Philpott, with the return address of The Book Club of California.
3 Inventory of Texiana, 1969
“Unpriced Inventory of Texiana[,] Being a List of Rare and Important Autographed Letters, Manuscripts and Historical Documents Relating Particularly to Early Texas[,] Collected during the last half century by William A. Philpott, Jr.[,] Consultant, Texas Bankers Association[,] P.O. Box 1466, Dallas, Texas 75221[,] and offered for Sale by him in this year, 1969, A.D.”
4 Inventory of Teiana, with Addenda, 1969, 1973
Photocopy of the catalog in Folder 3, with three addenda: (1) Addenda as of August 11, 1969 to Inventory, issued July 25, 1969; (2) Second Addenda to the Philpott Inventory, dated October 15, 1969; (3) Third Addenda to the Philpott Collection, dated November 15, 1973.
5 Photographs, undated
Three photographs.
  • Print of a photograph of a man, woman, and young boy, no identification (perhaps Mr. Philpott and his parents?). Undated.
  • Photograph. Verso says “Wm A Philpott, Jr[,] Secretary[,] Texas Bankers Ass’n[,] Dallas, Tex[,] Please return”. Undated.
  • Large black-and-white portrait of Mr. Philpott. This portrait appears on page 172 of Gatton’s history of the Texas Bankers Association. Oversize item moved to box OS497.

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Series II. Texas Bankers Association Records, 1885-1956

Box Folder
1 6 Texas Bankers Association, proceedings of first convention, 1885
Proceedings of the First Convention of the Texas Bankers’ Association held in Lampasas Springs, July 23-25, 1885, with Constitution and By-Laws. The book has “W. Goodrich Jones, Temple, Texas” stamped on the front cover. William Goodrich Jones (1860-1950) was a bank president in Temple, Texas, and was called the “father of Texas forestry” for his roles in the founding of the Texas Forestry Association in 1914 and the creation of the Texas Department of Forestry (later the Texas Forest Service). W. Goodrich Jones State Forest in Montgomery County is named after him.
7 Texas Bankers Association convention proceedings, 1904
Proceedings of Twentieth Annual Convention of the Texas Bankers’ Association held in El Paso, May 3-5, 1904. Contains many pictures (bankers, El Paso, West Texas, etc).
8 Texas Bankers Association convention proceedings, 1905
Proceedings of Twenty-First Annual Convention of the Texas Bankers’ Association held in Dallas, June 13-14, 1905. Contains some pictures of bankers.
9 Texas Bankers Association convention proceedings, 1911
Proceedings of Twenty-seventh Annual Convention of the Texas Bankers’ Association held in Dallas, May 16-18, 1911. Contains some pictures of bankers.
10 Texas Bankers Association convention proceedings, 1912-1913
Bank account passbook for account of Texas Bankers Assn, R. Coy[,] Treas[.], with The Western National Bank, Fort Worth, Texas — May 1912 to May 1913.
11 Texas Bankers Association convention programs, 1913-1914
Programs of two annual meetings of the Texas Bankers Association.
  • 29th Annual Meeting of the Texas Bankers’ Association held in Galveston, May 13-15, 1913. This includes the program for the First Annual Convention of the Texas Women’s Bankers Association on May 14, 1913.
  • 30th Annual Meeting of the Texas Bankers’ Association held in Fort Worth, May 5-7, 1914. Includes the program for the Texas Women Bankers Association meeting on May 6, 1914.
12 Texas Bankers Association checks, 1931
Two checks issued in December 1931 by the Texas Bankers Association and signed by Mr. Philpott.
13 Dead Bank Robber reward program, approximately 1933
Poster and Notice relating to the Texas Bankers Association’s Dead Bank Robber reward program, effective January 15, 1933. The poster gives the rules for earning the reward, and the Notice instructs member banks about displaying the poster. Oversize item moved to box OS497.
14 Texas Bankers Association convention invitation and program, 1940, 1956
Invitation to the 56th Annual Convention of the Texas Bankers Association to be held in Galveston, May 21-23, 1940; and program of the 72nd Annual Convention of the Texas Bankers Association held in Dallas, May 13-15, 1956.

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Series III. James Morgan Papers, 1830-1891, undated

Box Folder
2 1 Business papers, 1830-May 1835
Papers relating to business interests of James Morgan.
  • August 17, 1830 — Promissory note signed by Morgan for goods purchased. Payee’s name illegible. Verso reflects a payment of $400 made in 1832. Dated at Murfreesboro. This was likely Murfreesboro, North Carolina, as Morgan lived in North Carolina at one time, and the United States Supreme Court decision in Allen v. Gillette says that one of Morgan’s executors was from Murfreesboro, North Carolina.
  • March 2, 1831 — Morgan / James Reed articles of copartnership for firm of Morgan & Reed for term of five years. Morgan contributed 17 Negroes (each named in the agreement), two horses, a barouche and harness, and $1,000 cash for total value contributed of $6,500, and Reed contributed $6,500 cash. Agreement made in Tallahassee, with the Negroes and horses to remain in Florida with Morgan for the present.
  • January 1, 1833 — Draft for $400 with Morgan’s signature on verso. Maker’s name illegible; payee’s name appears to be Mills. Contains apparent endorsement on the front with date March 25, 1835, and apparent notation of payment on verso with date April 29, 1835.
  • May 5, 1835 — Morgan / James Reed agreement to dissolve their partnership. Reed sells his interest in the partnership to Morgan. Appears to contain a reference to Liberty County, Texas, but is difficult to read because of faded ink.
2 Business papers – Employment Agreements, October 1835
Employment agreements entered into by Morgan in October 1835 while Morgan was obtaining workers in the United States for the settlement at New Washington, Texas.
  • October 8, 1835 — Morgan / Prince Cooper indenture for apprenticeship of Cooper’s ward, Webster Augustus, to Morgan.
  • October 12, 1835 — Morgan / Hugh Fraser (carpenter) employment agreement. Fraser’s name is spelled “Frasier” in the body of the agreement but appears to be signed “Fraser.”
  • October 18, 1835 — Morgan / Thomas Blair (ditcher and gardener) employment agreement.
  • October 21, 1835 — Morgan / James Clarkson (carpenter) employment agreement.
  • October 22, 1835 — Morgan / Locey [or Lacey] Pearsall (laborer) employment agreement.
3 Business papers – Emily D. West employment agreement, October 1835
October 28, 1835 — Morgan / Emily West employment agreement for West to “work for said Morgan at any kind of house work she, said West, is qualified to do”.
4 Business papers, 1836-April 1837
Papers relating to Morgan’s business interests.
  • February 4, 1836 — Manuscript certified copy of a deed, written and signed by William Hardin, first judge of the jurisdiction of Liberty, for the sale by Benjamin Lanier to James Morgan of one-half undivided interest in a league of land that Lanier received as a colonist of the empresario Joseph Vehlein on June 20, 1835. Joseph Vehlein (?-?) was a German businessman who received three empresario grants in Texas from the Mexican government in the 1820s. This document refers to the grant of December 21, 1826, which was the second grant to Vehlein.
  • February 13, 1837 — Morgan / Henry Hodges (sawyer) employment agreement. Includes a provision that Hodges will buy his “necessaries” from Morgan to the extent Morgan has them for sale.
  • April 6, 1837 — Morgan / Aaron Burns agreement. Burns was master of the schooner Kosciusko; Morgan and Burns agreed to share expenses and revenue in carrying passengers and freight on the schooner.
  • April 1837 — Morgan / Walter Little agreement for Morgan to buy a raft of logs from Little, payment half in cash and half in goods.
5 Business papers, May 1837-1838
Papers relating to Morgan’s business interests.
  • May 5, 1837 — Thomas Choate / Frederick A. Sanger [or perhaps “Sawyer”] contract for deed for a half league of land. Morgan owned the other half of the league and signed the contract as a witness.
  • May 26, 1837 — Manuscript copy of letter from Morgan to Isaac Stone. Morgan appeared to say that someone had reported to him that Stone said in New Orleans that he intended to make changes in New Orleans and Texas, and Morgan inferred that he was to be replaced as agent. This letter is very hard to read because of the handwriting. Isaac Stone was a United States Consul at Veracruz, Mexico in the late 1820s and in Cuba in the 1840s.
  • December 14, 1837 — Morgan / Walter Little agreement for Morgan to buy 100 cords of wood from Little, payment to be in merchandise.
  • February 26, 1838 — Agreement by which Morgan engaged the services of Messrs. Gazley and Birdsall to establish the will of a deceased person whose surname appears to have been Ruth and given name appears to have begun with “J.” The fee of Gazley and Birdsall to be $250 unconditionally and an additional payment [$500?] conditioned on the successful establishment of the will. Thomas Jefferson Gazley (1798-1853) and John Birdsall (1802-1839) were law partners in Houston. Gazley was also a doctor, clerk of the ayuntamiento (town council) of San Felipe de Austin, a signer of the Texas Declaration of Independence, and a member of the House of Representatives of the Second Congress of the Republic of Texas. Birdsall was Attorney General of the Republic of Texas in 1837, was appointed by President Houston to be Chief Justice of the Texas Supreme Court but was not confirmed by the Senate, and briefly was Sam Houston’s law partner in 1839 before Birdsall died of yellow fever later that year.
  • March 28, 1838 — Morgan / Locey Pearsall agreement for Morgan to clear out, at Morgan’s expense, the headright that Pearsall was entitled to as a Texas settler, with Morgan to receive half the land. Notation by Morgan at the bottom says he afterwards purchased the other half.
  • November 15, 1838 — Manuscript of an apparent promotional piece by Morgan about the “Town of Swartwout” in Liberty County on the Trinity River. Gives the town’s location in reference to Galveston Bay, Liberty, Nacogdoches, and Houston, and discusses a hotel, church, and several dwellings being built.
6 Business papers, 1839-1843
Papers relating to Morgan’s business interests.
  • June 10, 1839 — Receipt by Morgan for a note received from G. F. Richardson to collect from D.L. Kokernot. Appears to include a handwritten note dated January 25, 1845, about giving up the note. David Levi Kokernot (1805-1892) was a Dutch-born warrant officer in the U.S. Revenue Cutter Service who came to Texas after being rescued from a shipwreck off the Sabine estuary, participated in the Texas Revolution and, after the battle of San Jacinto, was reprimanded and ordered by President Burnet to return livestock that Kokernot had seized from settlers along the Trinity River.
  • October 27, 1839 — Morgan / William Wills contract for Wills to receive 200 acres of land in Liberty County.
  • January 7, 1841 — Morgan’s notice of dissolution of partnership of Morgan and Richardson because of death of George F. Richardson. Dated at Swartwout.
  • November 4, 1841 — Receipt by Morgan for collections for Morgan & Richardson at Swartwout.
  • November 2, 1842 — Morgan / Jonathan Westover agreement for Westover to build a grist mill on land owned by Morgan in Liberty County, in exchange for receiving 50 acres of land. Verso contains a sale by Westover of his rights and interest to J. Lott and J.S. Brown dated December 18, 1843, as well as Morgan’s October 6, 1844, approval of the transfer and a release of Westover from the contract.
  • November 2, 1842 — Another version of the preceding document, but without the signature of Westover acknowledging receipt of a copy of the agreement.
  • November 28, 1842 — Morgan / Franklin & Co. agreement for Franklin & Co. to run the steamboat Ellen Franklin between Galveston and Swartwout as a passenger and freight boat, with Swartwout the boat’s headquarters on the Trinity River; Franklin & Co. to receive 4 lots in Swartwout from Morgan.
  • February 2, 1843 — Bond for deed in which Morgan agreed that two years from date of purchase of the “lands specified in the preceding list” he would make a deed to [name illegible] “or to such persons as he shall request” of “our undivided half of all the lots of land which shall not have been redeemed at that time.”
7 Business papers, 1844
Papers relating to Morgan’s business interests.
  • February 22, 1844 — Morgan / Hermann Holstein agreement for Holstein to cultivate Morgan’s gardens. Produce not needed by Morgan’s family to be sold and the proceeds split.
  • March 4, 1844 — Title Bond from Elijah Hunnings to Robert N. Dobie of 125 acres in Harris County, with the verso containing an April 3, 1846, transfer to James Morgan of Dobie’s interest in the land.
  • March 29, 1844 — Morgan / J.W. King [verso indicates that “J.W.” stands for “James Wm.”] agreement for King to work in Morgan’s blacksmith shop, with proceeds of the blacksmith work to be split between Morgan and King.
  • October 5, 1844 — Manuscript copy of Morgan agreement permitting William S. [or L.?] Gates to live on and cultivate land owned by Morgan in Liberty County.
  • October 5, 1844 — Manuscript copy of Morgan agreement permitting Joshua Lott to cultivate 20 acres of land owned by Morgan in Liberty County.
  • Approximately 1844 — Morgan’s account with Morgan & Richardson, showing amounts owed to and paid to Morgan from 1840-1844.
8 Business papers, 1845
Papers relating to Morgan’s business interests.
  • May 23, 1845 — Letter from Samuel Swartwout and Augustus W. Radcliff to Col. James Morgan, written from and postmarked in New York, sent to Morgan in New Washington, Texas, via New Orleans. References 22 leagues of land along the Navasoto [sic] River in Robertson County held in trust by James Fortune for those who were interested in it (the letter refers to them as “aliens” and says that they “cannot now hold [the land] in Texas”). References the annexation of Texas by the U.S. as “now certain to take place” and says that the property should soon be moved into the names of the real owners. Swartwout asks Morgan to “execute a proper declaration of trust to Augustus W. Radcliff Secretary of the Navasoto [sic] Association, in behalf of the parties interested in these grants” [emphasis original]. Augustus W. Radcliff was Texas Consul in New York in 1842.
  • July 17, 1845 — Manuscript copy of letter from Morgan to Augustus Radcliff relating to land titles.
  • August 5, 1845 — Power of attorney from Morgan, reciting that Morgan is attorney-in-fact for William D. Lee and is appointing Jacob de Cordova as his attorney-in-fact to receive all land patents that Lee may be entitled to receive from the General Land Office of the Republic of Texas.
  • September 22, 1845 — Citation (notice) by publication, with return, in the lawsuit of James Morgan vs. Joseph W. Scates, in the District Court, Liberty County, Republic of Texas.
9 Business papers, 1846
Papers relating to Morgan’s business interests.
  • January 24, 1846 — Deed of trust (mortgage) by Morgan to Alfred F. James of 1,600 acres in Harris County (“New Washington” tract) to secure Morgan’s note of $1,200 to Nathaniel A. Ware. Notation on verso that note was paid in full, March 25, 1848.
  • February 12, 1846 — Document from Geo. F. Richardson Estate saying that J. Morgan papers in care of W.H. Palmer were sent back to Morgan.
  • February 23, 1846 — Morgan / S.C. Lafitte agreement for Lafitte to rent a house on Galveston Bay for one year, with Morgan to allow one month’s rent for improvements made by Lafitte and Lafitte to have the right to purchase the property within six months.
  • June 1846 — Manuscript copy of letter from Morgan to Augustus W. Radcliff, secretary of the Navisoto Association, apparently describing what was done, and the expenses incurred, in obtaining land grants for the Association. Letter mentions services of a Col. Palmer [apparently a lawyer] and consultation with a Mr. Allen about investigating the validity of the titles. Letter describes attempts to get settlers and Morgan’s concerns about being paid for his services. Oversize item moved to box OS497.
10 Business papers, 1847-1851
Papers relating to Morgan’s business interests.
  • April 29, 1847 — Morgan / Jacob De Cordova agreement for De Cordova to attempt to perfect claims to five tracts of land, at his expense, and in return to receive one-half of the land.
  • April 29, 1847 — Morgan / J. De Cordova agreement for DeCordova to locate surveys and patents for 15 tracts of land, with DeCordova to receive one-fourth of the land.
  • November 12, 1849 — Deed to Morgan from John N. Reed, Harris County Assessor and Collector, for three lots in Houston purchased by Morgan at public sale for 1848 taxes. Verso contains two notations of April 23, 1850, transfers by Morgan of some of the lots.
  • April 23, 1850 — Acknowledgement signed by W.R. Baker, Clerk, Harris County Court, of assignment by James Morgan to A.C. Daws of Lot 7, Block 138, City of Houston.
  • April 23, 1850 — Manuscript copy, signed by Morgan, of list of lots in Houston bought by Morgan for himself and John N. Reed at assessor and collector’s tax sale for 1848 taxes.
  • April 23, 1850 — Morgan promissory note to John N. Reed for $74.67 to be paid by Morgan from sale of land purchased at assessor and collector’s sale for 1848 taxes in Harris County.
  • April 23, 1850 — Power of attorney from Morgan appointing John N. Reed his agent and attorney to settle for and redeem land in Houston bought by Morgan at the assessor’s and collector’s sale for taxes for the year 1848 and previous years.
  • July 16, 1851 — Morgan / Russell & Williams (___ Russell and C.B. Williams) agreement for Russell & Williams to purchase cattle and brands from Morgan.
11 Business papers, November 1852
Documents relating to a total of 32,609 acres of land owned by James Morgan and sold at public sale in Harris County, Texas, in 1852, for delinquent taxes.
  • Two-and-a-half-page “List of Property belonging to Col. James Morgan + bought by Geo. Stevens at tax sale Nov. 15, 1852”.
  • November 20, 1852 — 16 deeds by John W. Bergin, Assessor and Collector for Harris County, to George Stevens, conveying land owned by James Morgan in Harris County and sold at public auction for Morgan’s unpaid State and County taxes for the year 1851. The third page of each deed contains a handwritten deed signed by Stevens and dated September 2, 1854, but without the grantee’s name filled in.
12 Business papers, November 1852-1854
Documents relating to a total of 32,609 acres of land owned by James Morgan and sold at public sale in Harris County, Texas, in 1852, for delinquent taxes.
  • November 17, 1852 (1 document) and November 20, 1852 (remainder of the documents) — 17 deeds by John W. Bergin, Assessor and Collector for Harris County, to George Stevens, conveying land owned by James Morgan in Harris County and sold at public auction for Morgan’s unpaid State and County taxes for the year 1851. The third page of each deed contains a handwritten deed signed by Stevens and dated September 2, 1854, but without the grantee’s name filled in. Note: The one deed dated November 17, 1852, is out of chronological order because the deeds in this and the preceding folder were arranged in an order that corresponded to the order in which the properties appeared in the two-and-a-half-page list in Folder 11.
  • September 6, 1854 — Geo. Stevens certificate that Morgan applied to him to redeem listed properties that Stevens had bought at tax sale in 1852, but the properties had earlier been redeemed through John W. Bergin, assessor and collector, by David Ayres. David Ayres (1793-1881) was a New Jersey native (born David “Ayers”) who came to Texas in 1832 and became a prominent merchant, educator, publisher (the Texas Christian Advocate 1857-1858), and promoter of the Methodist Church in Texas, living primarily in Washington County and Galveston.
  • September 12, 1854 — Document, writer unknown, signed by A.P. Thompson, W.B. Reeves, and Wm. R. Baker as witnesses — certifying that in 1854 James Morgan tendered money sufficient to redeem his property sold at tax sale in 1852 for 1851 taxes.
13 Business papers, 1855-1863
Papers relating to Morgan’s business interests.
  • May 23, 1855 — Agreement between Morgan (as attorney-in-fact for James Reed of New Orleans) and John B. Ashe (of Galveston) to sell Ashe 600 acres in Harris County known as the Allenwood place. John Baptista Ashe (1810-1857) was a North Carolina native who served as a U.S. Representative from Tennessee (1843-1845) and later moved to Galveston, where he practiced law until his death in 1857.
  • July 24, 1857 — Morgan / W.O. Harding contract for Morgan to sell land in Polk County to Harding. Verso has an assignment of the contract from Harding to G.M. Harding dated April 28, 1858.
  • August 17, 1858 — Morgan / David Drysdale indenture. Morgan conveys 843 acres on San Jacinto Bay to Drysdale to secure payment of Morgan’s promissory note to Drysdale.
  • April 17, 1861 — Morgan deed of trust (or conditional deed) of a league of land in Jasper County to William N. H. Smith to secure Morgan’s account owed to Smith.
  • May 9, 1862 — Power of attorney from Morgan to John J. Johnston, Jr. to sell some land on the San Jacinto River.
  • January 10, 1863 — Power of attorney from Morgan to John J. Johnston, Jr. to close unfinished business Morgan has with John Hart of Liberty County.
14 Commander of Texas forces at Galveston, 1836
Two documents relating to Morgan’s service as commander at Galveston Island during the Texas Revolution: Document (June 16, 1836) signed by Col. Morgan to deliver six sacks of corn to Mr. Doyle; Manuscript copy of letter (November 4, 1836) from Morgan to several addressees, including General Thomas Jefferson Rusk, John A. Wharton, and Mirabeau B. Lamar, asking for an opinion of whether Morgan engaged in any misconduct while in command at Galveston Island.
15 Correspondence – Personal, 1861
Two letters (November 4, 1861, and November 24, 1861) from John J. Johnston, Jr. to Morgan, reporting personal news.
16 Estate of James Morgan, Deceased, 1870-October 1875
Papers relating to the administration of Morgan’s estate, of which H.F. Gillette and George Ball were two of the executors named in Morgan’s will.
  • January 21, 1870 — Survey by E.J. Parsons made for James Tolar of 160 acres, part of the headright league of J.J. Blackman on Little Cypress Creek in Tyler County.
  • July 6, 1871 — Two surveys made by John McBride (County Surveyor of Tyler County): (1) survey made for J.W. Weeks of 160 acres out of the H. Blackman League, (2) survey made for John Lawson of 200 acres out of the H. Blackman League.
  • January 1, 1872 — Promissory note from P.H. Weber to H.F. Gillette and George Ball, executors of the estate of James Morgan, in part payment of 100 acres of land from the one-third league of the Locey Pearsall Survey belonging to the estate of Morgan. Verso shows several payments on the note.
  • May 17, 1872 — Letter from George Ricks, District Clerk of Liberty County, to W.B. Cline of Woodville, regarding the fee for a copy of a deed from ______ Felder to John A. Veatch.
  • October 10, 1872 — Bill from Geo. Ricks to Wm. Cline for $3.00 for surveying abstracts of land titles and examining deed records at the Clerk’s office in Liberty.
  • April 1875 — Deed from Sheriff of Tyler County to H.F. Gillette and George Ball, executors of the estate of James Morgan, for 226 acres of land in Tyler County (part of the B. Blackman League) for $25 (bid made by their agent W.B. Cline). Sale was made under a writ of sale following judgment in case No. 1245, Gillette & Ball Ex. vs. Wm. T. Long, in the District Court of Tyler County.
  • October 12, 1875 — Promissory note from Henry Glass to George Ball and H.F. Gillette, executors of estate of Jas Morgan, in part payment for 100 acres of land out of the Locey Piersall [sic] one-third league in Waller County. Verso says “No. 1.”
  • October 12, 1875 — Promissory note from Henry Glass to George Ball and H.F. Gillette, executors of estate of Jas Morgan. Verso says “No. 2.”
17 Estate of James Morgan, Deceased, December 1875-1876
Papers relating to the administration of Morgan’s estate.
  • December 20, 1875 — Letter from H.F. Gillette to W.B. Cline. Gillette was being sued to make partition by one of Morgan’s heirs and expressed concern about issues relating to payment of taxes on or title to a tract of land called the Veatch League which was a league of land in Zavalla’s Colony.
  • August 2, 1876 — Letter from H.F. Gillette to W.B. Cline regarding the Morgan estate.
  • September 2, 1876 — Letter from F.C. Usher of Liberty to W.B. Cline of Woodville, regarding several people in apparent response to an inquiry by Cline. Persons discussed are Wm. Hardin, Daniel P. Cort[?], “the Bryans,” Pryor Bryan, George M. Patrick, Wm. Ricks, Charles Douglass, and a “Hutchinson.”
  • September 14, 1876 — Letter from F.C. Usher of Liberty to W.B. Cline of Woodville, enclosing a postal card from Hutcherson & Carrington giving the address of G.M. Patrick. Mentions some of the same names as the preceding letter, as well as the Blackman deeds.
  • September 21, 1876 — Letter from G.M. Patrick of Anderson, Grimes County, to F.C. Usher, regarding business conducted by the writer and Col. James Morgan in 1835, 1836, and 1837.
  • September 25, 1876 — Letter from F.C. Usher of Liberty to W.B. Cline of Woodville. Discusses land purchases by Geo. M. Patrick for James Morgan. Also mentions Col. Frank Hardin of Liberty, Joseph Bryan, and the Blackman League.
18 Estate of James Morgan, Deceased, 1877-1891, undated
Papers relating to the administration of Morgan’s estate.
  • September 24, 1877 — Letter from R. Lockart of Houston to W.B. Cline of Woodville. Lockart was one of the commissioners appointed by the court to divide the property of the estate of James Morgan among the heirs, and H.F. Gillette had referred him to Cline in reference to six tracts of land in Hardin and Tyler counties.
  • April 27, 1880 — Bill of Costs from the District Clerk of Tyler County [or perhaps Liberty County?] in case No. 1288, John I. [?] Holland [?] vs. [James?] Toler and Ball & Gillette Exec. [James] Morgan Dec’d . $117.40 in costs. Certified by Stephen P. West.
  • 1881 — Draft of a deed [there are blanks where dates would be filled in, in two places, and no acknowledgement] from May Morgan of Frankfort, Kentucky, by attorney-in-fact H.F. Gillette [month and day of the power of attorney are blank, as is the book in which the power of attorney was recorded in Harris County; the year of the power of attorney is stated to be 1881], to John D. Walker of Uvalde County, for 960 acres of land in Uvalde County (Survey No. 144) patented to James Morgan, assignee of David J. Jones.
  • January 7, 1887 — Receipt from the Tax Collector of Polk County for $2.31 in 1886 property taxes paid by Est. J. Morgan (H.F. Gillett [sic] ex.).
  • November 28, 1887 — Receipt from the Tax Collector of Polk County for $2.64 in 1887 property taxes paid by [line left blank].
  • December 8, 1887 — Receipt from the law firm of Ballinger, Mott & Terry for $500 paid by Henry F. Gillette for fees in the U.S. Circuit Court in Galveston in the case of Allen v. Gillette (“decided in his favor”). Further employment in the case in the U.S. Supreme Court will be in accordance with a November 23, 1887, letter to Gillette.
  • February 29, 1888 — Receipt from the Tax Collector of Tyler County for $24.97 in 1887 property taxes paid by H. West, agt for Est. Jas Morgan.
  • June 12, 1888 — Letter from M.F. Mott of Willie, Mott & Ballinger, attorneys in Galveston, to H.F. Gillette, regarding receipt from Gillette of $120 in cash and a draft for $74.25, in payment of fees owed in the case of Allen vs. Gillette. The balance due is $307.75, which Mott would like to receive as soon as convenient because he wants to close all accounts with Judge Ballinger’s estate. Gillette had not endorsed the draft, so Mott is returning it to him to endorse with the request that he endorse it to T.N. Waul to pay him for briefing the case in the Supreme Court.
  • March 26, 1889 — Receipt from the Tax Collector of Tyler County for $28.17 in 1888 property taxes paid by Jas. Morgan.
  • December 7, 1889 — Receipt from the Tax Collector of Tyler County for $27.53 in 188_ property taxes paid by Est. Jas Morgan by Judge West.
  • July 4, 1890 — Receipt on letterhead of Willie, Mott & Ballinger, Attorneys and Counselors at Law, Galveston, for $307 received from H.F. Gillett [sic] for the balance of their fee in the case of Allen v. Gillett [sic]. Signed “Ballinger, Mott & Terry In liquidation per. M.F. Mott.”
  • January 1, 1891 — Receipt from the Tax Collector of Tyler County for $26.25 in 189_ property taxes paid by H. West agt for Est. James Morgan.
  • Undated (but sometime after 1877, based on the content of the document) — Agreement between H.F. Gillette as Executor of the Estate of James Morgan, Dec’d and Mrs. Ophelia Cox, nee Miss Ophelia Morgan, of Frankfort, Ky, one of the legatees of the estate, providing that in exchange for relinquishing any claim to certain land at Morgan’s Point fronting Galveston Bay, Mrs. Cox is to receive 120 acres of land in Polk County near Swartwout. Appears to be only part of the document, as there is no signature page.

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Series IV. Other Personal Papers, 1633-1903, undated

Box Folder
2 19 Antonio Lopez de Santa Anna, 1832-1842, 1876
Letters signed by Antonio Lopez de Santa Anna, and a newspaper clipping of his obituary.
  • October 3, 1832 — Letter from Antonio Lopez de Santa Anna to Sr. D. Patricio Furlong. Furlong was a Mexican politician and was governor of Puebla in 1828-1829 and 1832-1833.
  • June 1, 1836 — Facsimile of the front and back of a document in Spanish signed by Santa Anna, with signatures of Ramon Martinez, Juan N. Almonte, Bailey Hardeman, and Lorenzo de Zavala on the front. Verso has Santa Anna’s signature and a note dated June 7, 1836, with the signature of John A. Wharton. Accompanied by a typewritten explanation of the facsimile document [undated and unsourced] as Santa Anna’s farewell address to his friends. John Austin Wharton (1806-1838) was a Tennessee native who was a leading advocate of Texas independence from Mexico. He served as adjutant general of the Texian army, was commended for bravery at the battle of San Jacinto, and briefly served as Secretary of War of the Republic of Texas in 1836.
  • July 10, 1842 — Antonio Lopez de Santa Anna to General Don Mariano Paredes y Arrillaga, on letterhead of Secretaria Particular del Presidente de la Republica, Palacio Nacional de Mexico, with typed transcription in Spanish.
  • 1876 — Clipping from an unidentified newspaper with an obituary of Santa Anna. Verso contains part of an article (which reads more like an editorial, blasting President Grant and “rais[ing] the inquiry whether the present war against the Sioux was wisely undertaken and well planned”) that indicates it was written the day after news of Custer’s defeat at the Little Big Horn reached the newspaper.
20 Nicolas Briot, 1633
January 22, 1633 — Letter from Briot, in French.
21 Robert Carlisle / John Menefee, 1836
May 26, 1836 — Letter from Robert Carlisle of Alabama, to John “Manyfee” of Texas, Austin’s Colony, La Baca Bay, Coxes Point. The writer had returned to Alabama and was making up a company of volunteers to come to assist the recipient in Texas, but heard that they had taken Santa Anna and his army so thought it unnecessary to come with the company. The writer planned to return to Texas around Christmas. Robert Carlisle (?-?) was an Irish immigrant who was one of the early settlers of Papalote, one of the oldest communities in Bee County, Texas. John Sutherland Menefee (1813-1884) came to Texas about 1830, fought at the battle of San Jacinto, was County Clerk (1837-1838), representative to the Republic of Texas Congress (1839-1840), and County Judge (1846) of Jackson County, and was active in the organization of the Methodist Church in Jackson County.
22 Nathaniel Hart Davis, 1845, 1849
Four letters to Nathaniel Hart Davis, one from his brother (Stephen Davis of Alabama) and three from his father (Nathaniel Davis of Mississippi).
  • March 7, 1845 — Letter from Stephen Davis to Nat Hart Davis, regarding the reaction to the U.S. Congress’ passage of a resolution to annex Texas. Predicts that thousands will move from Alabama to Texas because of hard times in Alabama, but expresses concern for the future (“I hope it will be a happy marriage but I fear its first born will be a dissolution of the blood cemented Union of 76”).
  • July 5, 1845 — Letter from Nathaniel Davis to his son Nat Hart Davis. The writer discusses the possibility of his and other relatives’ moving to Texas. Also discusses problems raising cotton in Mississippi, slaves on the writer’s plantation, and local attitudes toward annexation of Texas (“our people on this side of Sabine are as much in favor of annexation as are the Texans, altho’ you all will be the most benefited”).
  • October 16, 17, 1845 — Letter from N. Davis to Nat Hart Davis. Discusses improvement in the price of cotton, economics of cotton growing and advantage of Mississippi over Texas, the active slave market in Memphis, and the proposed Texas Constitution. The writer appears to criticize Texas political leaders but talks about possibly making a crop in Texas the following year. A postscript talks about slavery issues (“Keep out nonresident slave holders or Texas will soon stand in relation to other old Slave States like Ireland Stands to England”).
  • November 6, 1849 — Letter from Nathaniel Davis to his son Nat Hart Davis. This letter was written shortly after the 1849 southern commercial conference at Memphis, which the writer attended. The writer expresses strong pro-Union sentiments, suggests that division of Texas into an eastern slave state and northern and western free states would lead to the demise of slavery and a large increase in the price of cotton, and criticizes slavery and its southern advocates (the “large majority of the damn fools upholding this oppressive & unequal Institution[;]” men such as John C. Calhoun “are heartless wretches, who deserve the Scorn of the Christian world”).
23 John A. Dix, 1826, undated
Two items: A May 31, 1826 check drawn on the Bank of the United States, signed by Dix, with the payee blank; and an undated picture of Maj. Gen. John A. Dix. John Adams Dix (1798-1879) was a New Hampshire native, served as U.S. Senator from New York (1845-1849), U.S. Secretary of the Treasury (1861), major general in the U.S. army (1861-1865), U.S. minister to France (1866-1869), and governor of New York (1873-1874). Fort Dix, New Jersey, is named for him.
24 H.F. Gillette, 1870-1903
Personal papers relating to Henry Flavel Gillette. Receipts relating to a life insurance policy issued to Gillette by the Piedmont & Arlington Life Insurance Co. of Richmond, Virginia; a receipt for funds received from Gillette as “collections on trip in interest of Bayland Home;” receipts for real-estate taxes paid on land owned by Gillette (and his estate) in Stephens County, Texas, and a letter asking if any of the property is for sale; an acknowledgment of money owed to Gillette on land sold by him; and a letter to Mr. Gillette’s son, J.A. Gillette, asking about a possible sale of some unidentified land.
25 James Hiner, 1857-1861
A letter by Hiner and a ledger for Hiner’s account with merchants in Buchanan, Texas.
  • September 4, 1857 — Letter from J.M. Hiner to C.C. Alexander, Buchanan, Texas, regarding Milam County school lands at the mouth of the Paluxy, as well as other tracts on which Alexander might locate a claim. Also contains a comment about Texas politics (“We have killed off the Old ______ and our arms have been victorious. Old Sam and his colored friends will be compelled to look for sympathy elsewhere.”) Buchanan, Texas, was the county seat of Johnson County from 1856-1867. C.C. Alexander was the first District Clerk of Johnson County and later was County Judge, was one of the original county commissioners charged with organizing the newly created Hood County in 1866, and was one of Hood County’s original elected county commissioners in 1867.
  • May 1, 1861 — Account ledger for account of James Hiner with Dunn & Stroop, Buchanan, Texas, listing merchandise purchased and amounts charged from November 2, 1860 to April 19, 1861.
26 Sam Houston, 1815
April 25, 1815 — Reprint (appears to be from microfilm) of letter from Sam Houston to Capt. Alexander Campbell of Lexington, Va., regarding Houston’s uncertainty of his plans now that the war has ended. Accompanied by a typed transcription.
27 Ithamar Hubbell, 1833
March 23, 1833 — Certificate from United States War Department that Ithamar Hubbell of Missouri is entitled to a pension of $56.66 for his service as a private in the Army of the Revolution. Signed by Lew Cass, Secretary of War, and J.L. Edwards, Commissioner of Pensions. Ithamar Hubbell was a Revolutionary War soldier from New York who was one of the earliest American settlers of present-day Missouri in 1797, before the Louisiana Purchase. Lewis Cass, in addition to serving as Secretary of War under President Andrew Jackson, was a U.S. Senator from Michigan. Because of Sen. Cass’s support for the annexation of Texas, Cass County, Texas, was named for him.
28 Samuel Bell Maxey, 1865
April 28, 1865 — Letter from Maj. Gen. S.B. Maxey, from Camp at Beauchamp Springs, near Houston, Texas, to Messrs. Johnson [in the body of the letter, it appears to say Johnston] & Grimes, Contractors, Sherman, Texas, regarding a dispute about a contract for Johnson & Grimes to provide rations to the Osage Reservation and other Indians. Samuel Bell Maxey (1825-1895) was a Kentucky-born graduate of West Point who became a general in the Confederate army, was appointed commander of Indian Territory in 1863, and later served two terms as a U.S. Senator from Texas (elected in 1874).
29 Samuel McCulloch, Sr. and Samuel McCulloch, Jr., 1836
March 15, 1836 — Promissory note from Samuel McCulloch, Sr. and Samuel McCulloch, Jr. to John Alley for $1,500 payable on or before March 15, 1838, but “if the Mexican Govermint [sic] should exterminate the inhabitants of Texas this obligation to be nil and void”. Alley signed at the bottom under a statement that the note was given for the last payment for one-third league of land sold by Alley to McCulloch “and if the said Samuel McCulloch luse [sic] the said land by the Mexican Goverment [sic] driving all the Americans out of the country the above note to be nul [sic] and void”. Verso contains a certificate signed February 19, 1838, by J.S. Menefee, Clerk of the County Court and County Recorder for Jackson County.
30 Henry E. Shelley, 1900
March 28, 1900 — Letter from William D. Carrington of Buda, TX, to Col. H.E. Shelley of Austin, regarding a proposed trade of properties. Includes envelope with stamp and postmark. Henry E. Shelley was an Alabama native, Confederate veteran (brigade adjutant general at the end of the war), lawyer, superintendent of the Confederate Home at Austin (1898-1899), member of the Texas Board of Pardon Advisers (1899-?), and a member of first board of trustees of the State Institution for Deaf, Dumb and Blind Colored Youths, at Austin.
31 James Smith, 1837
November 25, 1837 — Agreement between John L. Lynch of Texas and James Smith of Tennessee. Smith agreed to provide Lynch with money to be invested in land in the Republic of Texas; Lynch agreed to take title in his name, for the mutual benefit of Lynch and Smith (one-third for Lynch, two-thirds for Smith). Signed by Josiah J. Crosby and Thomas Gay as witnesses.
32 Noah Smithwick / Nancy (Nanna) Smithwick Donaldson, circa 1895-1901, undated
Several handwritten sheets, a few typed items (including a poem entitled “The Texas Flag” bearing the signature of Nanna S. Donaldson, and a poem entitled “The Man in the Moon. By a Nonagenarian” with the typed name “Nancy smithwick [sic] Donaldson” at the bottom), a couple of newspaper clippings, and a sketch of the “Come and Take It” cannon flag. Most of the handwritten notes appear to be Mrs. Donaldson’s notes of dictation by Mr. Smithwick of his memoirs, which occurred during the 1890s. A portion of the notes is headed “Reminiscences of Louisiana”. The notes headed “Defunct Literature” may be memoirs of Mrs. Donaldson. The sketch of the “Come and Take It” cannon flag appears on page 105 of Noah Smithwick, The Evolution of a State or Recollections of Old Texas Days (Austin: The Steck Company, 1935) with the indication that the sketch was done by N. Donaldson. Some of the typed fragments are drafts of passages in newspaper articles that showed Noah Smithwick as the author.
33 Noah Smithwick / Nancy (Nanna) Smithwick Donaldson – leather wallet, undated
A leather wallet that Mr. Philpott’s catalog says belonged to Noah Smithwick.
34 Noah Smithwick / Nancy (Nanna) Smithwick Donaldson – embroidered bookmark, undated
An embroidered bookmark (“Be True In Heart”) that was included in the folder of Smithwick materials when received by the University of Texas at Arlington.
35 John Townsend, 1838
June 6, 1838 — Letter (on bright yellow paper) from B.D. Townsend of Houston to his uncle John Townsend of Albany, New York, introducing the bearer of the letter, Gen. Clark Wooster of Connecticut, who has spent the last Spring at Houston and can give the recipient information about the situation and business capacity of the area. Also contains a note by Clark Wooster requesting that John Townsend accept some drafts. John Townsend (with his brother Isaiah) owned an iron works at Albany in the early nineteenth century, was active in banking and insurance, and served as mayor of Albany (1829-1830, 1832).
36 Nahor Biggs Yard, 1839
November 18, 1839 — Honorable Discharge of N.B. Yard, private in Galveston Company of Volunteers, signed by E.M. Lean [or E. McLean?] as acting captain and H.W. Karnes as colonel commanding. Henry Wax Karnes (1812-1840) was the first person to advise Sam Houston of the fate of the Alamo, was a scout at San Jacinto, and was imprisoned by the Mexicans at Matamoros when he attempted to negotiate a prisoner exchange in 1836. Karnes County, Texas, is named for him.

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Series V. Legal and Business Records, 1817-1944, undated

Subseries A. Austin County (Republic of Texas) Government Records 1839
Box Folder
2 37 Austin County (Republic of Texas) government records, 1839
A bond and two road commissioners’ reports from Austin County, Republic of Texas.
  • February 13, 1839 — Bond signed by McHenry Winburn as principal and Oliver Jones and Harris [or perhaps “Horris”?] Eggleston as sureties (“securities”). The bond is payable to Mirabeau B. Lamar, President of the Republic of Texas, in the amount of $5,000, to ensure Winburn’s faithful performance of his obligations as sheriff of Austin County. McHenry Winburn was a veteran of the battle of San Jacinto, was the second sheriff of Austin County (1839-1840), and later engaged in a successful law and real-estate partnership with Isaac L. Hill in Fayette County. Oliver Jones (1794-1866) was one of Stephen F. Austin’s Old Three Hundred colonists, represented Texas in the legislature of Coahuila y Texas, served in the Congress of the Republic of Texas, was chairman of the committee charged with producing a flag and seal for the Republic, and was a delegate to the annexation convention of 1845.
  • July 8, 1839 — Report to Commissioners Court of Austin County by Commissioners ordered to review the road from San Felipe to Bastrop through Precinct No. 3. Commissioners are Fr. [?] Ernst [?], Charles Fordtran [?], David Shelby, and John F. Pettus.
  • December 30 [or perhaps 20?], 1839 — Report of Commissioners, Republic of Texas, Austin County, regarding a road from Lawrence Crossing on Mile Creek to the Washington County line. Commissioners are John W. Collins, Nathaniel Reed, James Hall, and Thomas Bell.
Subseries B. Business Records, 1817-1905, undated
Box Folder
2 38 Glass & Callender, 1858-1878
Documents relating to the Victoria, Texas, law firm of Glass & Callender and its members. Note: Folder 42, Miller & Sayers, 1891-1905, undated, contains some documents relating to a lawyer named W.W. Glass and the firm of Glass & Burgess. The processing archivist has not been able to determine if there was a relationship between Glass & Callender and W.W. Glass or the firm of Glass & Burgess.
  • February 10, 1858 — Letter from D.M. Stapp of Indianola to Wm. S. Glass of Victoria regarding obtaining an affidavit of service from a Prosper Mangle so that a bounty warrant can issue, which would allow a land patent to be issued. Darwin Massey Stapp (1815-1875) was a settler in DeWitt’s colony (approximately 1830), a veteran of the Texas Revolution, a brigadier general in the Confederate army, and a prominent Victoria businessman.
  • January 29, 1866 — Letter from Edward Collier of Columbus, Texas, as agent for D.R. Ponce, to W.S. Glass of Victoria, regarding a note secured by a mortgage that Glass holds.
  • August 25, 1866 — Letter from D.R. Ponce of Washington, Texas, to W.S. Glass, asking if Glass has collected money owed to Ponce on a sale of land to McMahon.
  • August 16, 1867 [or perhaps 1869?] — Letter from D.E. Crosland of Lavaca to Glass & Callender of Victoria. The letter is very difficult to read because of the handwriting. It appears that the writer is trying to settle the business of an estate and collect a $10,000 life insurance policy from Aetna. Notation on verso indicates the letter was answered the day it was received.
  • April 16, 1878 — Letter from Hornor & Benedict Law Offices of New Orleans to Messrs. Glass & Calendar [sic] of Victoria, regarding an account that someone wants collected; if the plaintiffs pay a fee, the writer will remit to Glass & Calendar three-fourths of the fee.
  • June 9, 1878 — Letter from Frank Gildart [?] of Austin to Messrs. Glass & Callender of Victoria. The writer is responding to a request for information about land sales.
  • Circa September 11, 1878 — Letter from A.S. Hatch of Beeville to Wm. S. Glass of Victoria. The writer asks Glass to send him the land papers that he left in Glass’s hands.
  • September 21, 1878 — Letter from W.L. Gatlin of Waco to Messrs. Glass & Calender [sic] of Victoria. The writer appears to offer $200 to settle a lawsuit against him.
  • October 8, 1878 — Letter from W.S. Green, attorney at law, Covington, Ky, to Mr. Glass, regarding a possible compromise regarding a tract of land on the San Antonio River.
39 Huff & Veeder, 1832
Ledger showing charges for goods bought by Ayuntamiento (town council) from Huff & Veeder during the period August 12 – October 2, 1832.
40 McKinne’s Commission Ware-House, 1817
January 23, 1817 — Receipt from McKinne’s Commission Ware-House, Augusta [Georgia?], for seven bales of cotton received from Messrs H. and G. Webster.
41 Miller & Sayers, 1867-1887
Documents relating to the law and banking firms of Miller & Sayers of Gonzales, Texas.
  • November 11, 1867 — Deed of Trust (mortgage) signed by Thomas J. Pilgrim, President of the Board of Trustees of Gonzales College and as agent of the stockholders of Gonzales College, granting a mortgage on the college building and the lot on which it sits to secure the payment of a debt owed by the college to M.H. Allis for repairs to the college building. One of the witnesses is Wm. B. Sayers, and one of the trustees of the deed of trust is James F. Miller. Verso shows payment of the debt on November 11, 1871.
  • January 27, 1876 — Deed of Trust (mortgage) from W.H.H. Wade to Jas. F. Miller and W.B. Sayers, on 35 acres in Gonzales County to secure payment of a debt owed to Miller & Sayers.
  • March 26, 1877 — Handwritten letter on letterhead of Law Office of Miller & Sayers, perhaps signed by Margaret Vanham, regarding a claim owed to her.
  • June 5, 1878 — Sheriff’s Deed under order of sale as a result of a judgment from the District Court of Gonzales County in the case of James F. Miller and W.B Sayers vs. T.C. Ellis ______ Brown and Mary E. Brown; 119 acres of land of the defendants in Gonzales County conveyed to Miller and Sayers for $200.
  • November 29, 1887 — Deed of Trust (mortgage) from J.A. Nance to Miller & Sayers on 57 acres in Gonzales County to secure payment of a debt owed to Miller & Sayers.
42 Miller & Sayers, 1891-1905, undated
Documents relating to the law and banking firms of Miller & Sayers of Gonzales, Texas.
  • January 5, 1891 — Deed of Trust from M.G. Lowry to Glass & Burgess, attorneys (W.W. Glass and Geo. Burgess), conveying land in San Antonio, Bexar County, to Glass & Burgess as trustees to sell the land to pay off creditors of Lowry; 38 creditors are listed with amounts owed, including $6,000 owed to Miller & Sayers.
  • June 29, 1891 — Geo. F. Burgess and W.W. Glass (Glass & Burgess), as trustees under a deed of trust from J.M. Lowry & Co, dated January 5, 1891, deed conveying four tracts of land in Gonzales County to Miller and Sayers.
  • August 30, 1892 — Warranty Deed from Green DeWitt and wife Ella DeWitt to Jas. F. Miller and W.B. Sayers conveying land in Gonzales County, including the buildings, improvements, and equipment of DeWitt’s gin and mill and store house.
  • February 2, 1893 — Warranty Deed from J.F. Miller & W.B. Sayers to J.L. O’Banion conveying an undivided one-half interest in land in Gonzales County, including the buildings, improvements, and machinery of DeWitt’s gin.
  • June 18, 1902 — Agreement (on letterhead of the Banking House of Miller & Sayers) between Miller & Sayers and B.F. Mangum for Mangum to rent Miller & Sayers’ farm east of Gonzales for the year 1903 for $175.
  • July 10, 1905 — Receipt (on letterhead of the Banking House of Miller & Sayers) for $40 received from J.D. Sayers, Jr. on account of Estate of Arthur Eggleston.
  • Undated — Empty envelope with return address of Miller & Sayers, Bankers, Gonzales, Texas, and handwritten “J.D. Sayers, Jr Guardian”.
43 Texan Emigration and Land Company, 1857-1858
Land patents issued by the state of Texas to the Texan Emigration and Land Company, one warranty deed from the Company, and one letter from the Company.
  • October 28, 1857 — Land patent signed by Governor E.M. Pease conveying 320 acres in Young County, Survey No. 161, to Texan Emigration and Land Company. Oversize item moved to box OS497.
  • June 1, 1858 — Warranty Deed from Texan Emigration and Land Company to Nelson Shields conveying two half-sections (320 acres each) in Peters’ Colony in Palo Pinto County. Oversize item moved to box OS497.
  • July 7, 1858 — Land patent signed by Governor H.R. Runnels conveying 320 acres in Throckmorton County, Survey No. 910, to Texan Emigration and Land Company. Oversize item moved to box OS497.
  • July 10, 1858 — Letter from A.B. Fontaine, Secretary, Texan Emigration & Land Co., to John S. Shields of Paducah, enclosing deeds; not all patents have been received but will be distributed when they are.
  • July 15, 1858 — Land patent signed by Governor H.R. Runnels conveying 320 acres in Throckmorton County, Survey No. 948, to Texan Emigration and Land Company. Oversize item moved to box OS497.
  • August 17, 1858 — Land patent signed by Governor H.R. Runnels conveying 320 acres in Archer County, Survey No. 1378, to Texan Emigration and Land Company. Oversize item moved to box OS497.
  • September 18, 1858 — Land patent signed by Governor H.R. Runnels conveying 320 acres in Throckmorton County, Survey No. 2110, to Texan Emigration and Land Company. Oversize item moved to box OS497.
  • October 29, 1858 — Land patent signed by Governor H.R. Runnels conveying 320 acres in Palo Pinto County, Survey No. 2506, to Texan Emigration and Land Company. Oversize item moved to box OS497.
44 Valley View Hospital, 1903, 1905, undated
Certified copies from the office of the Texas Secretary of State of the corporate charters of Valley View Hospital (1903) and The Valley View Hospital Training School (1905), and a copy of the By-Laws of Valley View Hospital Association of Victoria.
Subseries C. Court Records, 1838-1894
Box Folder
2 45 Republic of Texas era court records, 1838-1843
Records relating to lawsuits in courts of the Republic of Texas.
  • March 26, 1838 — Appeal Bond for $100 signed by Noel Mixon as principal and Horace Eggleston as surety (“security”) in favor of Thomas Gay in connection with the appeal by Mixon of a judgment in the case of Thos Gay vs. Noel Mixon. Noel Mixon and Horace Eggleston were among the settlers who received grants from the Mexican government in 1835 of a league of land in present-day Blanco County. Thomas Gay was a merchant and one of the founders in 1835 of the Washington Town Company, which promoted the sale of town lots in Washington (later Washington-on-the-Brazos). The town of Gay Hill was named after Thomas Gay and William Carroll Jackson Hill, who operated a store in the town.
  • August 19, 1838 — Appeal Bond in the amount of $250 signed by Thomas Corothers [or Coruthers?] as principal and William Kykendall [or Kuykendall?] as surety (“security”) in favor of Genos Brunson in connection with a judgment against Corothers in Austin County. William Kuykendall was an early settler at San Felipe de Austin and was married to Eliza M. Carothers (or Caruthers).
  • September 17, 1838 — Injunction Bond signed by A. Blair and William P. Huff. Blair made claim to 75 bushels of corn that were levied on by the constable under a writ issued under a judgment signed by William Hunter, Justice of the Peace in Austin County, in the case of N. Whitehead vs. Jesse E. North; Blair obtained an injunction against the sale pending further order of Judge Hunter.
  • September 20, 1838 — Order signed by Wm Hunter, J.P., in the case of Alexander Blair vs. Nicolas Whitehead, Austin County; the corn remains the property of A. Blair. A Nicholas Whitehead received a Mexican land grant in 1832, and a Nicholas Whitehead is listed among the rear guard at Harrisburg during the battle of San Jacinto. A Nicholas Whitehead also received a 640-acre donation land grant, apparently in Austin County, for military service to the Republic of Texas.
  • Approximately January 6, 1839 — Motion for continuance in the case of N. Whitehead vs. Alex Blair.
  • May 1, 1839 — Appeal Bond in the amount of $100 signed by ___ Catlin [or perhaps Catlett?] as principal and Nicholas Whitehead as surety (“security”), payable to the Chief Justice of Austin County in connection with the appeal of a judgment in the case of Austin County vs. _____ Catlett [or Catlin?].
  • January 4, 1843 — Writ of execution signed by Richard Parmalee, Clerk of the District Court of Nacogdoches County, Republic of Texas, to collect a judgment in the case of Charles Chevaillier vs. Jesse Walling. Verso includes an assignment dated January 4, 1843, by Chevaillier of his interests to Chas. H. Gibson. Richard Parmalee (1817-1855) was born Richard P. Robinson in Connecticut; after being tried and acquitted in New York in 1836 for the hatchet murder of Ellen or Helen Jewett (reputed to be a prostitute), he came to Nacogdoches, where he called himself Parmalee. He became a prominent citizen of Nacogdoches and was clerk of the district court from 1839-1850. Charles Chevallier was a prominent Nacogdoches merchant. Jesse Walling (1794-1867) was a prominent Texas landowner, veteran of the battle of San Jacinto, justice of the peace in Nacogdoches County (1838), member of the House of Representatives of the Republic of Texas (1842-1843), and one of the namesakes of Walling Bend in Bosque County.
  • July 25, 1843 — Writ of execution signed by Richard Parmalee, District Clerk of Nacogdoches County, Republic of Texas to collect taxes for 1841 owed by Mayfield & Duffield. The returns of David Rusk, Sheriff and Tax Collector, dated July 20, 1843 and November 3, 1843, show the land that was levied on (two tracts, 1100 and 1200 acres) and that the sale was advertised. David Rusk (?-1877) was the brother of Thomas Jefferson Rusk, fought at the battle of San Jacinto, and was a five-term sheriff of Nacogdoches County (1837-1845).
46 Statehood era court records, 1859-1894
Records relating to proceedings in courts of the state of Texas.
  • January 1, 1859 — Administrator’s Bond and Oath in the amount of $14,000 by Alexis T. Rainey, as administrator of the estate of Sarah A. Quarles, deceased, payable to the Chief Justice of Anderson County. Alexis T. Rainey served as a Confederate regimental commander in the Civil war and was wounded at the battle of Gaines’ Mill in Virginia.
  • October 13, 1859 — Alias capias [essentially an arrest warrant] issued by C.C. Alexander, Clerk, District Court, Johnson County, by James Hiner, Deputy, in the case of The State of Texas vs. Madison Shelton, indictment for false imprisonment, directed to the Sheriff of Denton County, to take Madison Shelton into custody and bring him to the Johnson County Courthouse in the town of Buchanan. Return dated October 19, 1859, by Joe C. Carter, Sheriff of Denton County, said Shelton was not found in Denton County.
  • December 16, 1872 — Citation by publication, with publisher’s return affidavit, in the case of Nancy M. Davis and John K. Davis her husband vs. Mary Wilson and her husband Morgan Wilson, Huston Wilson, Henry C. Wilson, Permelia Baker and Nathan Baker her husband, in the District Court of Dallas County. The lawsuit involved title to 140 acres of land in Dallas County surveyed by Texas Emigration and Land Company. The return affidavit, dated October 23, 1873, is by A.B. Norton, editor and proprietor of Norton’s Union Intelligencer of Dallas. Anthony Banning Norton (1821-1893) was an Ohio-born lawyer, politician, and newspaper editor who was active in antebellum Whig politics. Norton was a member of the Texas legislature (elected 1857 and 1859), editor of the pro-Union Austin Southern Intelligencer (1860), delegate to the Texas Constitutional Convention of 1866, postmaster of Dallas (1875), and U.S. Marshal for northern Texas (1879).
  • January 12, 1894 — Certified copy of order admitting will of Caroline Yarborough to probate in Case No. 1185, Estate of Caroline Yarborough, Deceased, B.B. Yarborough, Executor; County Court of Grayson County, Texas. Also includes copies of the application to probate will (with listing of assets of the estate) dated November 18, 1893, and the will dated November 20, 1889 [the day before she died, according to the application]. The certification by the Clerk of the County Court is dated January 4, 1923.
Subseries D. Land Records, 1835-1944, undated
Box Folder
2 47 Land Records, Louisiana, 1836
April 12, 1836 — Receipt (duplicate) from the Land Office at Ouachita, La. for $875 received from Jean Baptiste Prudhomme, Jr. of Natchitoches, La., for about 700 [?] acres of land in the rear of and adjacent to Laud’s [?] fronting on the Red River, Rigoulet de Bondieu, and Little River; the front lands had been confirmed to Madam Dartigeaux [Darligeaux?], Nicolas Docla, and Jean Baptiste Prudhomme (purchased from the United States, Certificate No. 316). Jean Baptiste Prudhomme, Jr. was a prominent planter in antebellum Louisiana.
Box Folder
3 1 Land Records, Anderson / Hardin / Henderson / Tyler counties, Texas, 1835-1852, undated
Documents relating to an 1835 Mexican land grant to J. Huntingdon and two subsequent conveyances of the property.
  • October 6, 1835 — Certified copy of land title, in Spanish, for one league issued by the Mexican government to J. Huntingdon. The certification by the Commissioner of the General Land Office of the Republic of Texas is dated October 20, 1841. According to the General Land Office’s Land Grant Database, this land is in present-day Anderson and Henderson counties.
  • February 10, 1838 — Warranty Deed from J. Huntingdon to James G. Minor, conveying the league of land in Liberty County, Republic of Texas, granted to Huntingdon as a colonist by George Ant. Nixon, Commissioner, on October 6, 1835. Isaac Stone signed as a witness.
  • May 12, 1842 — Warranty Deed from James G. Minor to Edward Baily, conveying the league of land granted to J. Huntingdon by George Antonio Nixon on October 6, 1835. Signed by Dan J. Toler and Josiah J. Crosby as witnesses. This document contains additional acknowledgements – one by Stephen Crosby, brother of Josiah J. Crosby, and one by Robert M. Elgin (both dated August 25, 1856), attesting that the signatures of Josiah J. Crosby and Dan J. Toler (both deceased) are genuine, and one by Thomas M. Bagby and James T.D. Wilson, September 30, 1856, that the signature of J.G. Minor (present residence unknown to them) is genuine.
  • July 20, 1852 — Certificate from the General Land Office with manuscript copies of translations (by Joseph Carriere) of field notes of grants to J. Huntingdon, R. Prince, and Elisher [sic – should be Elisha according to the title on file at the GLO] Duncan. The GLO’s Land Grant Database shows the Prince grant in Tyler County and the Duncan grant in Hardin County.
  • Undated — Two copies of a translation by Joseph Carriere of the field notes contained in the original title of J. Huntingdon dated October 6, 1835.
2 Land Records, Bexar County, Texas, 1877-1884
Three deeds conveying land in Bexar County. Parties involved in the transactions were S.M. Wharton and wife M.C. Wharton, Mary E. Smith, Mary E. Johnson, T.J. Johnson, Samuel Johnson, and J.A. Matthews.
3 Land Records, Calhoun County, Texas, 1911
July 17, 1911 — Release of Deed of Trust lien. John Clark released his lien on 608 1/6 acres of land in Calhoun County conveyed to C.C. Blardone.
4 Land Records, Clay County, Texas, 1859-1900
Certified copy of a land patent (1859), four deeds (1882, 1887, 1888, 1897), and one Sheriff’s Deed following a public sale of property under a writ of execution to collect a judgment in a lawsuit (1900). Oversize item moved to box OS497.
5 Land Records, Cooke County, Texas, 1856
February 28, 1856 — Land patent signed by Governor E.M. Pease conveying 320 acres in Cooke County to Micajah H. Bonner, assignee of John Sturrock. Recorded in Wise County May 16, 1857, indicating that at least part of this tract may now be in Wise County, which was formed largely from land that had been in Cooke County. Micajah Hubbard Bonner (1828-1833) was a law partner of James Pinckney Henderson until Henderson’s election to the U.S. Senate in 1857, a district judge at Tyler (1873-1878), an associate justice of the Texas Supreme Court (1878), and Chief Justice of the Texas Supreme Court (1878-1882). Oversize item moved to box OS497.
6 Land Records, DeWitt County, Texas, 1842, 1868
Two deeds conveying land in DeWitt County, Texas.
  • August 13, 1842 — Deed from Peterson C. Bell to Nicholas Richards and Arthur Swift, conveying one-third league of land (the headright of Uriah Blue represented by Certificate No. 20 issued by the board of land commissioners for Washington County). This deed was recorded in Gonzales County in August 1842 and in DeWitt County on June 1, 1853. DeWitt County was formed in 1846, in part from land that had been in Gonzales County. The GLO’s Land Grant Database shows a patent issued to Uriah Blue under a Certificate No. 20 for land in DeWitt County. This deed was signed as a witness by Chas. Braches (1813-1889), who was a Prussian-born merchant in Gonzales, member of the House of Representatives of the Congress of the Republic of Texas (1842-1843), and benefactor of schools and churches.
  • November 3, 1868 — Deed from James F. Blair, Sheriff of DeWitt County, to Fayette Smith, conveying land in DeWitt County as a result of a public sale to collect a judgment from the District Court of Washington County in the case of E. Nichols vs. John M. Brown.
7 Land Records, Gonzales County, Texas, 1844-April 1866
Three deeds and one bond for deed relating to land in Gonzales Couty, Texas. The first document in this folder (dated October 14, 1844) is from David Ayers, administrator de bonus non of the estate of Alexander Carmack, deceased, conveying Carmack’s headright to the heirs of William W. Gant because of the failure of the original administrator of Carmack’s estate, Thomas Gay, to execute a deed to Gant during his lifetime. The GLO’s Land Grant Database is the source for placing this land in Gonzales County. The second document in this folder was signed by E.W. Cullen as a witness. Ezekiel Wimberly Cullen (1814-1882) was a veteran of the Texas Revolution and the sponsor in the Congress of the Republic of Texas of the Cullen Act (approximately 1839) that laid the groundwork for a public-education system in Texas by starting land endowments for public schools and universities. Note: The land that is the subject of the first document in Folder 6 may have been in Gonzales County at one time.
8 Land Records, Gonzales County, Texas, May 1866-1883
Two deeds, three deeds of trust (mortgages), and one indenture relating to land in Gonzales County, Texas. The fourth document in this folder is a deed of trust in which the trustees were James C. Dilworth and Hugh Lewis, and the deed of trust was given to secure payment of a debt owed to George W. Littlefield. J.C. Dilworth was a partner of George Littlefield in a dry-goods store in Gonzales. Hugh Lewis was a banker, cattle raiser, and one of the organizers of the San Simon Cattle and Canal Company, which had extensive ranch holdings in Texas, New Mexico, and Arizona between 1883 and 1902.
9 Land Records, Gregg County, Texas, undated
Undated (but, based on content, post-1847) survey map of land along the Sabine River, showing tracts of James E. Glasscock, Mansfield Garrett, Ezekiel Norris, Asa Massie, William Massie, John W. Massie, Mathew Dockrey, Frost Thorn, Henry Hoover, and James Faddis. This document also contains the name H.H. Edwards. The land was placed in Gregg County through information obtained from the GLO’s Land Grant Database. The Database also contains a Mexican land grant showing that Haden H. Edwards signed his name “H.H. Edwards.” Oversize item moved to box OS497.
10 Land Records, Harrison County, Texas, 1835
August 19, 1835 — Mexican land grant, in Spanish, to Joseph Nations. Signed by George W. Smyth. The GLO’s Land Grant Database shows this land as located in Harrison County.
11 Land Records, Hopkins County, Texas, 1835
November 11, 1835 — Certified copy from the General Land Office of a sketch on file in the Spanish Archives of the General Land Office “accompanying and forming a part of the title made by Geo. W. Smyth, Commissioner, to Lovick P. Dikes by Decree of Nov 11th 1835.” The Land Grant Database shows this land as located in Hopkins County. The GLO’s certification is dated May 3, 1886. Oversize item moved to box OS497.
12 Land Records, Houston County, Texas, 1837
May 1, 1837 — Certified manuscript copy of a deed from Charles H. Sims to Haden Edwards, conveying an undivided half of a league of land granted by commissioner Jorge Ant. Nixon to Matthew Gallatin on October 28, 1835. The copy was written and signed by Charles S. Taylor, chief justice of Nacogdoches County, Republic of Texas. Charles Stanfield Taylor (1808-1865) was a member of the Texas Revolutionary Committee of Correspondence and a signer of the Texas Declaration of Independence. Charles H. Sims (1801 or 1809-?) was an Indian agent for the Republic of Texas and a mercantile partner of Charles S. Taylor at Nacogdoches. Oversize item moved to box OS497.
13 Land Records, Jack County, Texas, 1892, 1901
Three deeds to land in Jack County, Texas. Parties named are J.W. Mayo and wife J.P. Mayo, J.T. Goldsmith and wife N.B. Goldsmith, W.J. Brown, and B.W. Nunn.
14 Land Records, Lamar County, Texas, 1835
October 7, 1835 — Mexican land grant, in Spanish, to John Tailor (also spelled Taylor in one place). Property referred to as “Sassafras Bluffs,” and also a reference to the Rio Rojo (Red River). Persons named in the document include Geo. W. Smyth (special commissioner), Bennett Blake, George Aldrich (agrimensor = surveyor), Nathl Amory (traductor = translator). Bennett Blake (1809-1896) was a veteran of the Texas Revolution who acquired a substantial estate in land through his lending activities; he was a longtime judge in Nacogdoches County (1838-approximately 1862), a Texas delegate to the Congress of the Confederate States of America, and a delegate to the Texas Constitutional Convention of 1875. George Aldrich was a partner in the land business with Robert Anderson Irion and was the first county surveyor of Houston County. Nathaniel C. Amory (1809-1864) was a translator for land commissioner Jorge Antonio Nixon, helped secure the release of Texan prisoners captured in the Texas Santa Fe expedition, and served as secretary of the Texas legation to the U.S. (1839-1842) and as Texas consul at Boston (1842-1844).
15 Land Records, Limestone County, Texas, 1872, 1902
Deed by the Board of Trustees of Trinity University to 20 acres of land in Limestone County (1872), and correspondence A.S. Jameson, a merchant of Stoneburg, Texas, and Adrian C. Odom, County Treasurer of Limestone County, regarding property taxes on land in Limestone County.
16 Land Records, Montague County, Texas, 1859-1883
Two land patents, four deeds, and a promissory note (two copies) relating to land in Montague County, Texas. The land in the first document (October 28, 1859, land patent) was situated in both Montague and Clay counties. Oversize item moved to box OS497.
17 Land Records, Montague County, Texas, 1884
Four deeds conveying land in Montague County, Texas.
18 Land Records, Montague County, Texas, 1886-1889
Two deeds, a bond for deed, and a release of vendor’s lien relating to land in Montague County, Texas. The bond for deed and one of the deeds relate to land near the town of St. Jo and involve parties named Howell. The town was named for Joseph A. Howell, who was one of the promoters who laid out the town site.
19 Land Records, Montague County, Texas, 1893-1895
Five deeds, a deed of trust (mortgage), a release of vendor’s lien, and a contract and other legal documentation for a home-improvement project, relating to land in Montague County, Texas.
20 Land Records, Montague County, Texas, 1896-1899
Four deeds, a redemption receipt from the tax collector’s office for payment of delinquent property taxes, and a certificate from the Texas State Comptroller regarding filing of a Delinquent Tax Receipt, relating to land in Montague County, Texas.
21 Land Records, Montague County, Texas, 1900-1901
Four deeds, a promissory note, and an agreement relating to land in Montague County, Texas.
22 Land Records, Montague County, Texas, 1903-1905
Three deeds, three indentures, and a release of vendor’s lien relating to land in Montague County, Texas. Four of the documents relate to transactions involving the Georgia Investment Banking Company. One of the deeds is from J.D. Bellah. Mr. Philpott’s mother’s maiden name was Bellah.
23 Land Records, Montague County, Texas, 1906-1909
Three deeds and a release of vendor’s lien relating to land in Montague County, Texas.
24 Land Records, Montague County, Texas, 1910-1944
Three deeds, a land patent, and a redemption receipt from the tax collector’s office relating to land in Montague County, Texas. Includes a deed dated February 10, 1926, conveying land in the city of Bowie to Amon G. Carter, Fort Worth civic leader, philanthropist, and longtime publisher of the Fort Worth Star-Telegram. Oversize item moved to box OS497.
25 Land Records, Robertson County, Texas, 1872
Warranty Deed from W.W. Patrick to his wife, S.A. Patrick, conveying two tracts of land in Robertson County, with revenue stamp containing portrait of George Washington.
26 Land Records, Victoria County, Texas, 1842-1861
Two indentures, a sheriff’s deed, a deed of trust (mortgage), a receipt, an agreement, a handwritten note, and a Notice of Guardian Sale relating to land in Victoria County, Texas.
27 Land Records, Washington County, Texas, approximately 1837-1838
Two documents relating to land in Washington County, Republic of Texas
  • Circa 1837 — Agreement between W.B. Loftin and Willis W. Wiggins (both of Hardeman County, Tennessee). Wiggins agreed to take Loftin’s “waggons [sic] and people to the Republic of Texas.” Loftin agreed to clear out from the land office of the Republic of Texas whatever amount of land Wiggins would be entitled to as a settler, with Loftin to receive 50% of the land. Signed by Sylvester Bailey and James G. Bell as witnesses. Recorded in Washington County, Republic of Texas, on September 3, 1837. The Hardeman County referred to in this document could not be Hardeman County, Texas, as that county was not organized until 1858. Hardeman County, Tennessee, was organized in 1823.
  • January 25, 1838 — Indenture in which Alanson Ferguson pledged 500 acres of land in Washington County, Republic of Texas, to Robert Stevenson, attorney for Charles B. Stewart, administrator of the Estate of James Buchanan, Dec’d, to secure the payment of the notes given by Ferguson to Stevenson in part payment for the land. The land was granted to Buchanan by the Mexican government and was deeded to Ferguson by Stevenson.
28 Land Records, Wharton County, Texas, 1875
May 7, 1875 — Certified copy of patent signed by Richard Coke, Governor of Texas, conveying 640 acres in Wharton County to Isaac Coe, assignee of the S.A. & M.G. R.R. Co. General Land Office certification dated September 14, 1882. Oversize item moved to box OS497.
29 Land Records, Wise County, Texas, 1892-1901
A sheriff’s deed, deed of trust (mortgage), and a real estate coupon note (containing United States Internal Revenue Documentary stamps) relating to land in Wise County, Texas.
Subseries 5. Republic of Texas Public Debt, 1839
Box Folder
3 30 Republic of Texas Stock Certificate and Bond, 1839
A stock certificate and bond relating to the financing of the public debt of the Republic of Texas.
  • April 19, 1839 — Stock Certificate for 50 shares ($5,000) in the Consolidated Fund of Texas (created by act of the Texas Congress to consolidate and fund the public debt) issued to Saml J. Peters by Jackson Smith, Stock Commissioner of Texas, bearing interest at 10% payable semi-annually (September 1 and March 1). Oversize item moved to box OS497.
  • July 1, 1839 — Bond No. 79, for 100 pounds sterling, issued by the Republic of Texas, bearing interest at 10% per annum, payable semi-annually on January 1 and July1, maturity 30 years if not redeemed sooner, with 60 attached interest warrants; signed by Commissioners James Hamilton and A.T. Burnley (on behalf of President Mirabeau B. Lamar) and by R.G. Dunlap, Minister of the Republic of Texas to the U.S. at Washington; part of a $5 million bond issue approved by the Texas Congress in 1838. Oversize item moved to box OS497.

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Series VI. Maps, Sketches, and Pamphlets, 1847-1953, undated

Box Folder
3 31 Tristam Burges, The Valley of Alvardo, 1847
Booklet, Tristam Burges, The Valley of Alvardo, or the Spy of Tennessee: A Legend of Mexico, Providence: M.B. Young, 1847. 25-page poem with handwriting on the cover that appears to say “C. Allen”.
32 U.S. Rep. Lemuel D. Evans, speech, 1856
Reprint of a May 13, 1856, speech by Hon. Lemuel D. Evans, of Texas, in the U.S. House of Representatives, perhaps printed in the American Organ, a publication of the American Party. The speech attacks party and sectional politics, professional politicians, and the failure of the United States to recognize the Rivas government (with American William Walker as commander-in-chief of its armed forces) in Nicaragua.
33 Map of Texas and part of New Mexico, 1857
1857 map of Texas and part of New Mexico.
34 Pamphlet – Lampasas Springs & Environs, 1889
1889 promotional booklet, Lampasas Springs and Environs, no authorship claimed, published by Poole Bros. Printers and Engravers, Chicago. Contains several photos as well as text about the village of Lampasas (population approximately 3,500), the Lampasas River, Hancock Springs, Hanna Springs, the Park Hotel, and local business, industry, agriculture, and educational and religious institutions. Gives statistics for some commercial activity for the year 1888.
35 Pamphlet – The Peoples’ Guide, Galveston, 1890
Very small booklet, “The Peoples’ Guide,” published by Louis Gruetzmacher, Galveston, 1890, containing information about the city (e.g., street names, post office locations, streetcar schedules, train schedules) and ads by local merchants.
36 Lenoir Hunt and Adele Breed correspondence to Mrs. Culberson Deal, and manuscript excerpts of Bluebonnets and Blood, 1936
Letters from Adele L. Breed, granddaughter of Civil War-era Texas Governor Francis Lubbock, and her brother-in-law, author Lenoir Hunt of Houston, to Mrs. Culberson Deal of San Antonio. Mr. Hunt’s letter discussed his plans to market his upcoming book about Texas history and enclosed manuscript excerpts (including illustrations) from the book (Bluebonnets and Blood: The Romance of “Tejas” (Houston: Texas Books, approximately 1938)).
37 Book Club of California, Quarterly Newsletter, 1947, 1953
Two quarterly newsletters of The Book Club of California (Summer 1947 and Summer 1953).
38 Color drawing, Gen. Winfield Scott, undated
Color drawing of General Winfield Scott, accompanied by a handwritten note (undated and unsigned) indicating that the drawing was the frontispiece of a “current account of Mexican War, engraved by J.W. Orr, N.Y.”
39 Sketch, Military Plaza, undated
Undated black-and-white print of a sketch of Military Plaza, with a handwritten description on verso (writer unknown).

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Series VII. Ephemera, 1832-approximately 1938

Box Folder
3 40 Ephemera, 1832-approximately 1938
Facsimile of William B. Travis’ February 24, 1836, letter from the Alamo; facsimile of 1850 dinner menu from the St. Francis Hotel in San Francisco; checks; cards apparently allowing admittance of a person named Septha McKinney to lectures or courses at the University of Louisiana Medical Department, 1851-1857; facsimile of an 1888 poster advertising excursions from Austin to Galveston on the Houston & Texas Central Railway; 1908 membership certificate in the Brotherhood of American Yeomen; and a poster advertising the 1938 sale of the assets of the Texas Centennial Central Exposition. The checks are as follows: Three checks dated 1871, 1872, and 1877, signed by James G. Fair, drawn on California banks (Bank of California and The Nevada Bank of San Francisco); blank forms of W. Jockusch & Co. Bankers, Galveston, from the 1870s; 1907 cashier’s check forms from The Continental Bank & Trust Co. of Prosper, Texas, and the First National Bank of Grandview, Texas; and “Tarry Check[s]” issued by the Tarry Warehouse & Storage Co. of Wichita Falls, Texas, to its employees during the bank moratorium of March 1933. Oversize item moved to box OS497.

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Series VIII. Original Numbered Folders, undated

Box
4 Original Numbered Folders, undated

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