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TABLE OF CONTENTS


Overview

Agency History

Scope and Contents of the Records

Organization of the Records

Restrictions

Index Terms

Related Material

Administrative Information

Description of Series

Correspondence, 1846-1943, bulk 1861-1933,

Letter books and letterpress books, 1861-1863, 1871-1905,

Registers of letters received, 1870-1883,

Indexes to letters received, 1870-1899,

Texas State Library and Archives Commission

Texas Adjutant General's Department:

An Inventory of Adjutant General's Department Departmental Correspondence at the Texas State Archives, 1846-1943, bulk 1861-1933



Overview

Creator: Texas. Adjutant General's Department.
Title: Adjutant General's Department departmental correspondence
Dates: 1846-1943
Dates (Bulk): bulk 1861-1933
Abstract: The Texas Adjutant General's Department oversees the military interests of Texas to serve the state civil authorities and the citizens of Texas. The department also furnishes trained military personnel in cases of national emergency or war. The Adjutant General's Department received letters, telegrams, and postal cards from, and sent letters and telegrams to, a wide variety of persons and entities: public officials, the officers and enlisted men of all of the state militia units in Texas, Rangers and Ranger captains, high-ranking officers of the United States Army, representatives of businesses and corporations, and private citizens of Texas and of other states. These records consist of departmental correspondence (mostly incoming letters until the 20th century), 1846-1943; letter books and letterpress books (outgoing letters), 1861-1863 and 1871-1905; registers of letters received, 1870-1883; indexes to letters received, 1870-1899; and one carte-de-visite photograph. Dates covered are 1846-1943, bulk 1861-1933.
TSLAC Control No.: TX000309
Quantity: 121.62 cubic ft.
Language: These materials are written predominately in English with scattered Spanish throughout.
Repository: Texas State Archives
Sponsor: This collection was adopted for enhanced preservation by Dr. Glen Sample Ely in honor of former Sam Houston Regional Library and Research Center director Robert Schaadt and his many years of dedicated service.

Agency History

On November 13, 1835, the Consultation created the office of Adjutant General, as one of five heads of departments under the Commander-in-Chief of the Texian Army (the other offices being Inspector General, Quartermaster General, Surgeon General, and Paymaster General). On December 20, 1836, the 1st Congress passed "an Act to organize and fix the Military establishment of the Republic of Texas," which in addition to the aforementioned bureaus, created a Commissary General of Subsistence, a Commissary General of Purchases, and a Colonel of Ordnance, all of whom answered to the Secretary of War. On December 18, 1837, Congress passed—and later passed again over President Sam Houston's veto—an act making the Adjutant General a position elected by the Congress; the first man so elected was Hugh McLeod. This arrangement lasted less than two years, however, with subsequent Adjutant Generals—beginning with McLeod on January 30, 1839—being appointed by the President. Congress combined the offices of Adjutant General and Inspector General on January 28, 1840, and technically abolished this position on January 18, 1841. Yet Peter Hansborough Bell served as Adjutant General of Militia soon thereafter; and in legislation of February 1842, there is a reference to an Acting Adjutant General.

The Texas Navy at first operated under a separate Secretary of the Navy, appointed by the President as authorized by an act of Congress approved October 25, 1836. On January 18, 1841, Congress abolished this office and created a Naval Bureau under the Secretary of War and Marines. Of course, the end of the Republic in 1846 meant the end of the Texas Navy as well.

Whereas under the Republic the Adjutant General was subservient to the Secretary of War, under statehood the position was elevated to that of head of all military departments. After annexation, the 1st Legislature provided for an Adjutant General to be appointed by the Governor, in "an Act to organize the Militia of the State of Texas" (April 21, 1846). The duties which fell to the Adjutant General included the issuance of all military orders; the maintenance of records of appointments, promotions, resignations, deaths, commissions, etc.; the receipt of monthly and annual returns, and muster rolls from the various military units; the keeping of the records of general courts martial; recruitment and enrollment of Rangers and militiamen; and now, the issuing of all bounty and donation land warrants on the basis of military service to the Republic. This last duty was assumed by the Commissioner of Claims, pursuant to an Act of the legislature passed August 1, 1856; the office of the Adjutant General had been the victim of apparent arson in October 1855, allegedly by persons engaged in land certificate fraud. The position of Adjutant General was itself reestablished by the Militia Law of February 14, 1860, by which act he also assumed the duties of Quartermaster General and Ordnance Officer of the State.

With the Civil War came the reorganization of the office, an act of December 25, 1861 creating an Adjutant and Inspector General, who would also serve as Quartermaster and Commissary General, and Ordnance Officer. Oversight of the 33 Brigades of the Texas State Troops plus the Frontier Regiment fell to this office, just as later Adjutant Generals would split their time between the Militia and the Rangers (whatever the prevailing terminology). The demands of the Confederate States Army, often conflicting with the needs and desires of the State of Texas, would affect the entire period of the War.

During the Congressional phase of Reconstruction, the military affairs of the State of Texas, and many aspects of civil government, were controlled by the commander of the District of Texas (1866-1868), or of the 5th Military District (1868-1870). Within months of Texas' readmission to the Union under Radical Republican Governor Edmund J. Davis (1870), the Legislature created the Frontier Forces (June 13), the State Guard and Reserve Militia (June 24), and the State Police (July 1), all of which were commanded by a newly restored state Adjutant General. On November 25, 1871, the Legislature added a fifth organization, the Minute Men. The first Adjutant General so appointed, James Davidson, absconded with over $37,000 of state funds in 1872. The State Guard and Reserve Militia were merged into a simple state militia on March 19, 1873, and the State Police force was abolished April 22, 1873.

The place of the Frontier Forces was taken in 1873 and 1874 by the Rangers and the Frontier Men, and finally by the Frontier Battalion, organized by an act passed April 10, 1874, and commanded by Maj. John B. Jones until his promotion to adjutant general in 1879. At about the same time one can date the evolution of the Texas Volunteer Guard as the definitive militia organization for the state. On July 22, 1876, "an Act to suppress lawlessness and crime in certain parts of the state" authorized the creation of the Special State Troops, commanded first by Capt. Leander McNelly and subsequently by Capt. J.L. Hall. In the last year of the operation of this Special Force (1880-1881), it was commanded by Capt. Thomas L. Oglesby.

The Spanish-American War (1898) saw the nationalization of the Texas Volunteer Guard, which was organized into four regiments of infantry and one of cavalry, and designated the Texas Volunteers. After the war they were de-nationalized, and reorganized on April 1, 1903 as the Texas National Guard. On August 5, 1917, the Texas National Guard was drafted into federal service, forming the 36th Division, which was to be mobilized during World War II as well.

The Frontier Battalion was reorganized as the Ranger Force by an act of the Legislature on March 29, 1901. From time to time this regular force was supplemented by specially commissioned Special Rangers, Railroad Rangers, Cattlemen's Association Rangers, and Loyalty Rangers. Finally, on August 10, 1935, the Ranger Force was transferred to the Texas Department of Public Safety.

(Sources include Olson, Bruce A., "Texas National Guard," and Proctor, Ben H. "Texas Rangers," Handbook of Texas Online, both accessed August 21, 2019, and the records themselves.)

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Scope and Contents of the Records

The Texas Adjutant General's Department oversees the military interests of Texas to serve the state civil authorities and the citizens of Texas. These records consist of the Texas Adjutant General's departmental correspondence (mostly incoming letters until the 20th century), including one carte-de-visite photograph of an accused murderer, 1846-1943; letter books and letterpress books (outgoing letters), 1861-1863 and 1871-1905; registers of letters received, 1870-1883; and indexes to letters received, 1870-1899. Total dates covered are 1846-1943, bulk 1861-1933. The Texas Adjutant General's office received letters, telegrams, and postal cards from, and sent letters and telegrams to, a wide variety of persons and entities: public officials, the officers and enlisted men of all of the state militia units in Texas, Rangers and Ranger captains, high-ranking officers of the United States army, representatives of businesses and corporations, and private citizens of Texas and of other states. Although this series represents the bulk of the Adjutant General's correspondence, further correspondence is contained within other series of this record group. Thus, for example, correspondence of the Civil War era exists both in Departmental correspondence and in Texas State Troops Brigade correspondence; outgoing letters concerning the State Police are found in the Letter books and letterpress books subseries, but also in letterpress books specifically maintained for the State Police; Ranger correspondence is located in this Departmental correspondence series as well as in specific subseries in the Ranger records series. The inventory description reflects racial terms used in the records themselves that may be considered offensive.

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Organization of the Records

The departmental correspondence series of the Adjutant General's Department records is organized into four subseries:
Correspondence, 1846-1943, bulk 1861-1933, 107.63 cubic ft.
Letter books and letterpress books, 1861-1863 and 1871-1905, 10.54 cubic ft.
Registers of letters received, 1870-1883, 2.57 cubic ft.
Indexes to letters received, 1870-1899, 0.88 cubic ft.

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Restrictions

Restrictions on Access

Materials do not circulate, but may be used in the State Archives search room. Materials will be retrieved from and returned to storage areas by staff members.

Restrictions on Use

None.

Technical Requirements

Letterpress books are extremely fragile; pages are tissue-thin and bindings are either broken or ready to break. Therefore they may not be photocopied, and must be treated with great care.

Researchers are required to wear gloves provided by the Archives staff when reviewing photographic materials.

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Index Terms

The terms listed here were used to catalog the records. The terms can be used to find similar or related records.
Subjects (Organizations):
Texas Rangers.
Texas. Militia.
Subjects:
Cattle stealing--Texas.
Civil defense--Texas.
Civil disobedience--Texas.
Civil-military relations--Texas.
Crime--Texas.
Firearms--Texas.
Horse stealing--Texas.
Indians of North America--Wars--Texas.
Military law--Texas.
Military service, Voluntary--Texas.
Military surveillance--Texas.
Military training camps--Texas.
Peace officers--Texas
Quartermasters--Texas.
Places:
Texas--Boundaries.
Texas--History--1846-1950.
Texas--History, Military.
Texas--Militia.
Texas--Race relations.
Document Types:
Cartes-de-visite (card photographs)--Texas.
Correspondence--Texas.
Indexes (reference sources)--Texas.
Letterpress copybooks--Texas.
Registers (lists)--Texas.
Functions:
Protecting state.

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Related Material

The following materials are offered as possible sources of further information on the agencies and subjects covered by the records. The listing is not exhaustive.

Texas State Archives
In addition to the records listed, portions of many 19th and 20th century governors' records concern the Adjutant General's Department and related matters. Search governors' finding aids for rangers, militia, volunteer guard, national guard, or other similar terms.
Texas Adjutant General's Department Civil War records, 1855, 1860-1866, undated, bulk 1861-1865, 16.94 cubic ft.
Texas Adjutant General's Department military rolls, 1835-1915, 1917, 1935, undated, 131.25 cubic ft.
Texas Adjutant General's Department Ranger records, 1839-1975, undated, bulk 1854-1918, 40.94 cubic ft.
Texas Adjutant General's Department Reconstruction records, 1865-1873, undated, 7.87 cubic ft.
Texas Adjutant General's Department service records, 1836-1845, 1854-1865, 1870-1935, 179.07 cubic ft.
Texas Adjutant General's Department Texas Volunteer Guard records, 1874-1904, undated, 19.34 cubic ft.
Texas Adjutant General's Department Texas Volunteers (Spanish-American War) records, 1898-1904, bulk 1898-1901, 3.97 cubic ft.
Texas Adjutant General's Department Texas National Guard records, 1902-1931, 1939, 1941-1945, 1950, undated, bulk 1903-1911, 39.47 cubic ft.
Texas Adjutant General's Department Texas State Guard/Texas Defense Guard/Texas State Guard Reserve Corps records, 1938-1983, undated, 83.72 cubic ft.
Texas Secretary of State executive record books, 1835-1917, 15.18 cubic ft.

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Administrative Information

Preferred Citation

(Identify the item and cite the series), Texas Adjutant General's Department departmental correspondence. Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.

Accession Information

Accession numbers: 1933/001 and unknown others

Accession data is incomplete, but about two-thirds of these records (those dating 1850-1910) were transferred to the Texas State Archives by the Texas Adjutant General's Department on February 21, 1934. The remainder was apparently transferred sometime after 1946.

Processing Information

Processed by Tony Black, January 1986, May 1988

Corrections and further encoding to TARO project standards by Tony Black, March 2002.

Finding aid converted from EAD 1.0 to 2002 by TARO using the conversion stylesheet v1to02.xsl, July 2003.

One finding aid split into two smaller ones by Tony Black, August 2004.

Folder-level description, reintegrating the information from the split off correspondence finding aid, and editing for DACS compliance by Lauren Davis, August 2019

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Detailed Description of the Records

Correspondence, 1846-1943, bulk 1861-1933,
107.63 cubic ft.

These records consist of letters, telegrams, and postal cards, plus attachments, received by the Texas Adjutant General's office, plus some copies (mostly for the 20th century) of outgoing letters, dating 1846-1943, bulk 1861-1933.
Most of the incoming letters and telegrams were addressed either to the adjutant general, or to a subordinate (e.g., the assistant adjutant general, the quartermaster general, the quartermaster of the Frontier Battalion); a significant amount of the correspondence, however, was addressed to another party—most notably, the governor—and then referred to the adjutant general. Incoming letters for the 1870s and part of the 1880s have been registered and for the most part indexed (see subseries Registers of letters received and Indexes to letters received, described elsewhere). Copies of outgoing letters were only rarely included during the 19th century; within the first five years of the 20th century, however, the filing of carbon copies of outgoing letters became routine. The letterpress books of the Letter books and letterpress books subseries (described elsewhere) represent a fairly complete record of letters sent by the adjutant general from 1871 through 1905, and are also indexed. Using the registers, the filing system for some of the incoming correspondence can be reconstructed intellectually for the 1870s and 1880s; an alphanumeric code was registered in a ledger and written onto the reverse side of the letter itself, using the first letter of the last name of the correspondent plus a number related to the order in which the letter was registered.
The original order has been replaced by a roughly chronological one, usually in increments of seven to nine days; according to the biennial report of the Texas State Library, this "chronologizing" of the adjutant general's correspondence began in 1942-1944. (In 1994, two clumps of letters from 1883-1884 and 1888 were discovered misfiled with comptroller correspondence; they have been included below in that same original order.) No attempt has been made to place documents in exact date order. Where possible, enclosures have been kept with cover letters, but related items may be widely separated. Incoming and outgoing correspondence are interfiled chronologically.
The correspondence documents the day-to-day details of office operation, including the recruiting, paying, provisioning, arming, transporting, and training of the various military organizations of Texas throughout its history. In addition many significant developments in Texas history are reflected here. To cite a few examples: reports of depredations by Indians and bandits; petitions for exemption from service, discharges, and furloughs, especially during the Civil War; reports on Civil War hospital conditions; scouting reports; proclamations of martial law; petitions to form militia units, or to provision them; complaints of citizens against Rangers and militia units exceeding their authority; reports on the fence cutting wars of the 1880s; correspondence concerning violations of the civil rights of blacks; reports of arrests; requests for proof of service, especially in connection with applications for federal pensions for service during the War with Mexico, the Indian Wars, and the Spanish-American War; correspondence relating to cattle rustling; proceedings of courts of inquiry and courts martial; applications to become Rangers, and letters of recommendation accompanying those applications; correspondence concerning the nationalization of the Texas Volunteer Guard in 1898; requests for information concerning the fate of victims of the Galveston flood of 1900; reports of border troubles during the early 20th century; requests for, and reports of, enforcement of prohibition and anti-vice laws; correspondence concerning the use of the Texas National Guard and Rangers for strikebreaking; reports of "disloyalty," delivered by specially-appointed Loyalty Rangers during 1917-1918. Preliminary use of the printed biennial reports of the adjutant general is highly recommended, as a guide to the subjects likely to be treated in the correspondence of a given time period.
Correspondence from 1900 to 1925 was thinned by a sampling conducted in 1973. The criteria for the sampling is not known, however.
Arrangement
These records are arranged roughly chronologically.
Preferred Citation
(Identify the item), Correspondence, Texas Adjutant General's Department departmental correspondence. Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.
Processing Information
Processed by Tony Black, January 1986, May 1988
Additional folder-level description and DACS update by Lauren Davis, July 2019
Accession Information
Accession numbers: 1933/001 and unknown others
Accession data is incomplete, but about two-thirds of these records (those dating 1850-1910) were transferred to the Texas State Archives by the Texas Adjutant General's Department on February 21, 1934. The remainder was apparently transferred sometime after 1946.
Restrictions on Use
None.
Correspondence, 1846-1905
Box Folder
401-381 3. 1846-1847
4. 1848
5. 1849-1850
6. 1851-1852
7. 1853
8. 1854
9. 1855
10. 1856-1857
11-12. 1858
13. 1859
14. 1860
Box Folder
401-382 1. January 1861
2. February 1861
3. March 1861
4-5. April 1861
6-8. May 1861
9-11. June 1861
12-13. July 1861
14-19. August 1861
20-25. September 1861
26-28. October 1861
Box Folder
401-383 1. November 1861
2. December 1861
3. January 1862
4. February 1862
5-6. March 1862
7-9. April 1862
10-13. May 1862
14-17. June 1862
Box Folder
401-384 1-2. July 1862
3-4. August 1862
5-6. September 1862
7-9. October 1862
10-12. November 1862
13-14. December 1862
15-16. January 1863
Box Folder
401-385 1-2. February 1863
3-4. March 1863
5-6. April 1863
7-8. May 1863
9-11. June 1863
12-15. July 1863
16-19. August 1863
Box Folder
401-386 1-3. September 1863
4-5. October 1863
6-7. November 1863
8-9. December 1863
10-12. January 1864
13-14. February 1864
15-17. March 1864
18. April 1864
19. May 1864
Box Folder
401-387 1. June 1864
2. July 1864
3. August 1864
4. September 1864
5. October 1864
6. November 1864
7. December 1864
8. January 1865
9. February 1865
10. March-April 1865
11. May-July, August-December 1865
11A. undated [Civil War?]
11B. undated [Civil War?]
12. January-February, August-September 1866
13. April, September 1867
14. February-April, June, November 1868
15. January 1-15, 1869
16. January 16-31, 1869
17-18. February 1-15, 1869
19-20. February 16-28, 1869
Box Folder
401-388 1. March 1-15, 1869
2. March 16-31, 1869
3-4. April 1-15, 1869
5-7. April 16-30, 1869
8-9. May 1-10, 1869
10-11. May 11-20, 1869
12-13. May 21-31, 1869
16. June 16-30, 1869
14-15. June 1-15, 1869
Box Folder
401-389 1. Correspondence, July 1869
[Records include correspondence addressed to Governor Elisha M. Pease regarding appointments for government positions including requests for appointments, protest of appointments, nominations, and Qualification Notices.]
2. Correspondence, August 1869
[Records include correspondence addressed to Governor Elisha M. Pease regarding appointments for government positions including requests for appointments, protest of appointments, resignations, and nominations; a letter to former Governor A.J. Hamilton warning him that the Bosque County Board of Registers is being stacked in his opponent's favor for the gubernatorial election; Qualification Notices; a letter to Governor Pease warning that state owned land in Jefferson is being damaged by timber thieves; and two letters from a citizen of Wharton County complaining that county offices are understaffed.]
3. Correspondence, September 1869
[Records include correspondence addressed to Governor Elisha M. Pease regarding appointments for government positions including requests for appointments, protest of appointments, and nominations; a letter from the mayor of Paris requesting aid against detractors who have complained to the military about him in order to "appease the rebel element;" Qualification Notices; a requisition of arrest from the governor of Georgia to General Joseph Reynolds; a letter concerning the settling of a debt of a Texas military unit complicated by its absorption into the Confederacy; an oath of office for a justice of the peace; a letter signed by nine citizens of Cameron asking for forty to fifty soldiers "to assist in enforcing the laws of the government" as they believe a faction of disloyal citizens are dissatisfied with the provisional government of Texas to the point of insurrection; a letter from A.G. Walker of Tarrant County who writes to complain about his removal as county clerk and the state of the county government, followed by a statement concurring with Walker's letter and signed by seven citizens; a letter requesting a new precinct be created for Lexington in order to ensure voter turnout for former Governor A.J. Hamilton in the election against Edmund J. Davis; and a letter from the Mayor of Galveston concerning the Galveston Wharf Company.]
4. Correspondence, October-December 1869
[Records include correspondence addressed to Governor Elisha M. Pease regarding appointments for government positions; Qualification Notices; an oath of office for the constable of San Augustine County; a special order accepting the resignation of Governor Pease; notices that oaths of office had been filed; and a letter on behalf of D.C. Farmer requesting Governor Pease to intercede on his behalf so that he may keep his position as clerk of the District Court of Harris County as he has reformed after being "misled during the rebellion."]
5. Correspondence, January-April, June-August 1870
[Records include letters to Governor Edmund J. Davis regarding appointments in the Texas Rangers Frontier Forces; a print of general order number two issued by Adjutant General James Davidson concerning the division of the state into eleven military districts; two Report of Crimes documents for Sabine and Johnson Counties which list all outstanding criminals for those areas; an invoice of ordinance; and letters to Adjutant General Davidson regarding the formation of Frontier Forces companies from Capt. Franklin Jones of Company A, Capt. John Sansom of Company C, Capt. John R. Kelso of Company D, Capt. H.J. Recharz of Company E, Capt. D.P. Baker of Company F, Capt. H. Biberstein of Company L, and Capt. James Swisher of Company P.]
6. Correspondence, September 1-15, 1870
[Records include letters to Adjutant General James Davidson from men accepting commissions as officers in the Texas Rangers Frontier Forces; correspondence from Capt. Franklin Jones regarding the movement of his company, recruitment, payment, supplies, and the discharge of two disruptive privates; receipts for horses and saddles, often accompanied by a promissory note for payment; an invoice of ordinance; and a report of scouts from Capt. John W. Sansom.]
7. Correspondence, September 16-30, 1870
[Records include letters to Adjutant General James Davidson from men accepting commissions as officers in the Texas Rangers Frontier Forces; invoices of ordinance; letters that accompanied receipts for goods; a journal of march from Capt. Peter Kleid of Company O from San Antonio to Bear Creek; and a document with sworn statements against Cpl. H.H. Dupper (variation A.C.H. Duper) of Company K who was charged with the assault of a freedman and subsequently court-martialed.]
8. Correspondence, September 16-30, 1870
[Records include requests to pay the men of the Frontier Forces, written by Governor Edmund J. Davis; letters to Adjutant General James Davidson from men accepting appointments as officers; letters from Capt. D.P. Baker complaining of a lack of men mustered into his company and requesting to muster in less than fifty men, and a report of scout for Company C.]
9. Correspondence, October 1, 1870-October 15, 1870
[Records include letters to Adjutant General James Davidson from men accepting appointments, requests for supplies, and notices of receipt of supplies; a signed affidavit from Francisco Sanchez against Sgt. Pat Dolan for the unlawful seizure of Sanchez, his sons, and livestock and goods; pay orders signed by Governor Edmund J. Davis; a journal of march for Company D from San Antonio to Camp Wood; a letter from Company A requesting medical supplies for gonorrhea; a letter from Capt. Peter Kleid describing a brief Indian skirmish; and letters from Capt. Franklin Jones of Company A regarding the discharge of Pvt. Charles Butler and a forged letter retracting the discharge.]
10. Correspondence, October 16-31, 1870
[Records include letters to Adjutant General James Davidson regarding financial issues such as pay for the men, costs of supplies, bills due to vendors and hired help, and supplies needed.]
11. Correspondence, November 1-15, 1870
[Records include letters to Adjutant General James Davidson regarding financial issues, receipts for goods and guns, acceptance of officer positions, and reports of daily operations and scouts.]
12. Correspondence, November 16-30, 1870
[Records include letters to Adjutant General James Davidson from members of the Frontier Forces regarding receipt of supplies and guns, nominations for and acceptance of medical officer positions, and monthly reports. Also present are complaints sent to Adjutant General Davidson or Governor Edmund J. Davis including an accusation from a discharged private that Capt. H.J. Richarz stole his clothes and saddle with a rebuttal from Capt. Richarz written on the reverse; a list of men discharged due to a general order, and a report of one of the discharged men breaking a window in the quarters as a result; a letter from a man claiming that Capt. A.H. Cox has not been fulfilling his duties, followed by a response by Capt. Cox; a report of charges against Sgt. Dolan of Company D and a statement from Sgt. Dolan; and a letter of complaint concerning conditions and lack of supplies at the current camp of Company P from Capt. James P. Swisher.]
13. Correspondence, December 1-15, 1870
[Records include letters to Adjutant General James Davidson from members of the Frontier Forces regarding supplies, camp movement, and reports of operations; a monthly report of sick from the medical officer of Company G that lists diseases afflicting the camp; a report of an Indian attack on the medical officer of Company E resulting in a loss of supplies; a letter from Capt. W.W. Jones complaining about a lack of funds and supplies which has resulted in a few of the men selling their guns; the resignation of Capt. James Hunter of Company J, and a request for funds for supplies and clothing for the men; and two letters from Capt. H.J. Richarz regarding Indian depredations including a battle that resulted in the loss of his son.]
14. Correspondence, December 31, 1870
[Records include letters to Adjutant General James Davidson from members of the Frontier Forces regarding supplies, camp movement, financial issues, and reports of operations; a letter from Capt. H.J. Richarz regarding the discharge of Cpl. Alfred Ekard as he was also a commissioned lieutenant with the Prussian Guard Corp; a letter from Company E requesting pay for horses lost in battle; a list of medicines needed by the medical officer of Company J; several letters from George Sumner, medical officer of Company G including reports of the sick and disabled, and a request for a second horse so that he may travel between camps with more ease; and a letter from Capt. Richarz to Governor Edmund Davis listing complaints about the organization of the Frontier Forces and potential improvements.]
15. Correspondence, January 1-15, 1871
[Records include letters to Adjutant General James Davidson from members of the Frontier Forces regarding supplies, camp movement, financial issues, reports of operations, and letters that accompanied documents that have been separated out such as monthly returns and muster rolls; a Memorandum of Receipts at Arsenal; a discharge form; a letter from Lt. A.C. Hill of Company F requesting two Tonkawa Indians and fetters for the company's horses; and a report from Capt. Leander McNelly of the Special Police regarding a shootout in a Huntsville courthouse, the inciting incident of the Walker County Rebellion.]
16. Correspondence, January 31, 1871
[Records include letters to Adjutant General James Davidson from members of the Frontier Forces regarding supplies, camp movement, affidavits regarding lost or missing items, financial issues, reports of operations, and letters that accompanied documents that have been separated out such as monthly returns and muster rolls; documents granting power of attorney; a document recording the resolutions of a meeting of citizens of Uvalde County registering their displeasure with the mustering out of Capt. John R. Kelso and Company D; a proclamation issued by Governor Edmund J. Davis placing Walker County under martial law; a letter from Lt. A.C. Hill regarding the state of the frontier and depredations carried out by reservation Indians; a request to discharge five unruly men from Company K; and a report of the pursuit of Indians and stolen horses to a cave system on the Clear Fork of the Brazos River.]
Box Folder
401-390 1. Correspondence, February 1-15, 1871
[Records include letters to Adjutant General James Davidson from members of the Frontier Forces regarding supplies, an affidavit regarding a damaged pack saddle, financial issues, reports of operations, and letters that accompanied documents that have been separated out such as monthly returns and muster rolls; powers of attorney; vouchers for guns and supplies signed by Adjutant General Davidson; and an inventory of effects of Pvt. Patrick Goodall.]
2. Correspondence, February 1-15, 1871
[Records include letters to Adjutant General James Davidson from members of the Frontier Forces regarding financial issues, reports of operations, and letters that accompanied documents that have been separated out such as monthly returns and muster rolls; powers of attorney; a letter from Capt. G.C. Falcon listing all the men mustered out of Company G; a letter from Capt. John W. Sansom of Company C accepting command of Companies K, F, and B as well; and a letter protesting the mustering out of Capt. John R. Kelso and Company D signed by citizens.]
3. Correspondence, February 16-28, 1871
[Records include correspondence from Adjutant General James Davidson and Capt. Leander McNelly of the State Police regarding a court martial related to the Walker County Rebellion, which attempted to prosecute citizens who opened fire at the Huntsville courthouse; letters to Adjutant General Davidson from Capt. John W. Sansom of the Frontier Forces including a call for martial law in counties where cattle thievery was a growing issue; and a letter addressing citizens of Victoria protesting the sell of property belonging to the Presbyterian church from a chairman of the Board of Trustees of the Presbyterian Church.]
4. Correspondence, February 16-28, 1871
[Records include letters to Adjutant General James Davidson from members of the Frontier Forces regarding financial issues, reports of operations, and letters that accompanied documents that have been separated out such as monthly returns and muster rolls; documents relating to the Walker County Rebellion including sworn statements against Judge Advocate W.E. Horne, a telegram requesting all available guns and ammunition in Grimes County be forwarded to Huntsville, and a letter with 66 signatures that states that the civil authorities are amply able to preserve order; a petition of the citizens of Walker County requesting Capt. John W. Sansom of Company C and his company be reinstated in Kendall County; a letter from Capt. A.H. Cox regarding the death of Pvt. Patrick Goodlet from pneumonia and a request for medicine for others in camp with a similar affliction; and two reports from Company F regarding an extended skirmish with Indians.]
5. Correspondence, March 1-15, 1871
[Records include letters to Adjutant General James Davidson from members of the Frontier Forces regarding financial issues, supplies, reports of operations, and letters that accompanied documents that have been separated out such as monthly returns and muster rolls; a letter from the sheriff of Bandera County requesting that Capt. John W. Sansom and Company C stay in the area; a report from Capt. D.P. Baker regarding trouble in Wise County due to strong rebel sentiments; an account of fines collected during the existence of martial law in Hill County; a report from Company G of horses lost during an Indian battle; a document estimating the subsistence and forage supplies necessary for Company C; and a report from Lt. A.C. Hill regarding a celebration of the men of Company F.]
6. Correspondence, March 16-31, 1871
[Records include letters to Adjutant General James Davidson from members of the Frontier Forces regarding financial issues, supplies, reports of operations, and letters that accompanied documents that have been separated out such as monthly returns and muster rolls; letters from Capt. H.J. Richarz of Company E and Capt. Peter Kleid of Company O listing men they wish to be discharged and their reasons; vouchers for arms and supplies signed by Adjutant General Davidson; and a letter from Capt. Richarz expressing concern for the lawlessness in D'Hanis, including the murder of freedman Richard Edwards.]
7. Correspondence, March 16-31, 1871
[Records include letters to Adjutant General James Davidson from members of the Frontier Forces regarding financial issues, supplies, reports of operations, and letters that accompanied documents that have been separated out such as monthly returns and muster rolls; and vouchers for arms and supplies signed by Adjutant General Davidson.]
8. Correspondence, April 1-15, 1871
[Records include letters to Adjutant General James Davidson from members of the Frontier Forces regarding financial issues, supplies, reports of operations, and letters that accompanied documents that have been separated out such as monthly returns and muster rolls; vouchers for arms and supplies signed by Adjutant General Davidson; a joint resolution to supply the ten victors of an Indian battle with Winchester Carbines in exchange for Indian trophies; and a letter listing the effects of Pvt. Frank Holmes.]
9. Correspondence, April 16-30, 1871
[Records include letters to Adjutant General James Davidson from members of the Frontier Forces regarding financial issues, supplies, reports of operations, certificates of disability, and letters that accompanied documents that have been separated out such as monthly returns and muster rolls; vouchers for arms and supplies signed by Adjutant General Davidson; letters from different companies listing men they wish to discharge and the reason; and a letter to Governor Edmund Davis regarding horses supplied to the men of Company F and payment for those animals now that the company is being mustered out.]
10. Correspondence, May 1-15, 1871
[Records include letters to Adjutant General James Davidson from members of the Frontier Forces regarding financial issues, reports of operations, and letters that accompanied documents that have been separated out such as monthly returns and muster rolls; vouchers for arms and supplies signed by Adjutant General Davidson; two letters from the people of Wise County requesting Company F remain and a promotion for Lt. A.C. Hill to captain; a letter from S. Brown and Co. asking for compensation for supplies provided to Company F; and a letter from Capt. A.H. Cox regarding a skirmish with a group of Indian warriors.]
11. Correspondence, May 16-31, 1871
[Records include letters to Adjutant General James Davidson regarding financial issues, supplies for the Frontier Forces, and a report of operations for Company C; legal documents such as a power of attorney and an affidavit; a report from Capt. James McCullough regarding inspections of each Frontier Forces camp; two documents signed by Adjutant General Davidson that track supplies across all companies of the Frontier Forces; vouchers for arms and supplies signed by Adjutant General Davidson; and an official order to water horses at the creek rather than the cistern.]
12. Correspondence, June 1-15, 1871
[Records include letters to Adjutant General James Davidson or the pay master addressing financial issues; powers of attorney; a list of equipment sold at public auction; and vouchers signed by Adjutant General Davidson.]
13. Correspondence, June 16-30, 1871
[Records include letters to the paymaster of the Frontier Forces addressing financial issues; vouchers signed by Adjutant General James Davidson; a thank you letter to Adjutant General Davidson from Capt. Gregoria Garcia as he is mustered out of service; a letter from the medical officer of Company E stating a mistrust of Capt. H.J. Richarz with financial matters; and an abstract of issues made from the state arsenal.]
14. Correspondence, July 1871
[Records include letters to the paymaster of the Frontier Forces addressing financial issues; vouchers signed by Adjutant General James Davidson; powers of attorney; receipts of goods and pay; a letter from Sheriff R.D. Orton of Nacogdoches to Adjutant General Davidson about companies being formed; a return of sale for twenty-one mules and an ambulance; and a letter to Governor Edmund J. Davis in English and Spanish requesting pay for work executed by citizens under Companies N and D, followed by signatures.]
15. Correspondence, August 1871
[Records include letters and documents dealing with pay and other financial issues; vouchers signed by Adjutant General James Davidson; receipts of goods and pay; an affidavit about a lost mule; and a letter written in Spanish addressed to Cesario Falcon.]
16. Correspondence, September 1871
[Records include letters to the paymaster of the Frontier Forces addressing financial issues; a receipt for arms and ammunition from New York; a document recording the receipt of Indian trophies by the legislature and the legislature's refusal to reward the soldiers responsible with Winchester rifles as promised; a resolution to examine the actions of Adjutant General James Davidson on accusation of misappropriation of funds collected from Hill and Walker Counties while under martial law; two letters from George P. French and Co. requesting reimbursement for 30 guns stolen during a race riot in Limestone County; and the testimony and cross examination of P.H. French about events leading up to the Limestone County race riot which resulted in the institution of martial law in the county.]
17. Correspondence, October 1-7, 1871
[Records include several statements given concerning the shooting of a disorderly white man by two black State Police officers, Mitch Cotton and another man, and the ensuing riot in Groesbeck; a report from Capt. W.W. Richardson of the State Guard who arrested the two State Police officers to appease the mob and guarded them for six days; a Proclamation of Martial Law in Freestone and Limestone Counties in response to the riot; two letters dealing with financial matters; and a response to the resolution to examine the actions of Adjutant General James Davidson on accusation of misappropriation of funds collected from Hill and Walker Counties while under martial law.]
18. Correspondence, October 8-22, 1871
[Records include letters relating to the enforcement of martial law in Limestone County including the arrest of a man for the murder of a freedman and a state of affairs report from Maj. A.G. Malloy in which he reports disgruntled citizens along his march into town; special orders that arrange for the procurement of supplies and housing for necessary troops in Groesbeck; letters to the paymaster regarding financial matters; a response to the resolution to examine the actions of Adjutant General James Davidson on accusation of misappropriation of funds collected from Hill and Walker Counties while under martial law; and a letter regarding Governor Edmund Davis' intention of seeking funds he believed to be due the Texas government for frontier defense.]
19. Correspondence, October 8-22, 1871
[Records include a signed statement regarding the events prior to the riot in Limestone County; letters from Capt. George W. Farrow of the State Police regarding his command in Limestone County and his arrest by Col. G.W. Smith of the State Guards; a record of the proceedings of a military commission that finds Pvt. Stewart Collins of the Provisional State Troops guilty of robbery in Limestone County; a special order that assigns officers to the headquarters of the State Troops; and a record of votes thrown out in Anderson.]
Box Folder
401-391 1. Correspondence, October 23-31, 1871
[Records include two statements concerning the events of the riot in Limestone County; and two lists of vouchers and accounts from 1855 to 1860 received by Governor Edmund J. Davis.]
2. Correspondence, October 23-31, 1871
[Records include four statements regarding the events of the riot in Limestone County and the shooting of D.C. Applewhite by State Police officer Mitch Cotton.]
3. Correspondence, October 23-31, 1871
[Records include a list of special orders relating to the enforcement of martial law in Limestone County; statements concerning the events of the riot in Limestone County; two copies of the proceedings of a military commission in Limestone County in which the proceedings are delayed due to the judge advocate not being ready; a five dollar treasury warrant; and a list of frontier defense treasury warrants.]
4. Correspondence, October 23-31, 1871
[Records include statements regarding the events of the riot in Limestone County; a letter from Maj. Gen. A.G. Malloy of the State Militia asking Adjutant General James Davidson for permission to send an armed guard with a shipment of one hundred and twenty Winchester carbines and ammunition; and a ledger of supplies.]
5. Correspondence, October 23-31, 1871
[Records include a list of arrests made in Grimes County; a letter requesting exemption from the tax imposed by martial law in Limestone County for the firm of Block Bro & Co.; letters to the paymaster concerning financial issues; and statements regarding the events of the riot in Limestone County.]
6. Correspondence, November 1-7, 1871
[Records include special orders in relation to the events of the riot in Limestone County including payments, the end of Maj. Gen. A.G. Malloy's assignment there, and the release of A. Steagall, a participant in the riot; a statement regarding the events of the riot in Limestone County; receipts of a check, guns, and tactics; a letter from Capt. G.W. Farrow of the Special Police reporting the disorderly behavior of Lt. C.M.C. Alexander and the proceedings of his court martial; and a general order allowing the sheriff of Limestone County to collect taxes for 1871.]
7. Correspondence, November 1-7, 1871
[Records include witness testimonies in support of reimbursement for guns taken from G.P. French in Limestone County and a reply written on the wrapper of the letter denying the request; a letter from former mayor of Groesbeck A.J. Zadek explaining how he has aided the Republican cause and a letter from Adjutant General James Davidson requesting the martial law tax be waved for Zadek; statements relating to the events of the riot in Limestone County; special orders regarding pay and mustering out; a letter concerning the disorderly conduct of Lt. C.M.C Alexander; documents concerning the martial law tax in Limestone County; and a pay roll of a special constable force established by Judge J.W. Oliver.]
8. Correspondence, November 8-30, 1871
[Records include vouchers and receipts for goods and pay; a letter accusing the former treasurer of Groesbeck of misappropriation of funds and fraud; a letter from A. Steagall of Groesbeck accusing George P. French of not accepting the returned firearms and instead suing the government for many times their worth; documents related to the return of property seized during the period of martial law in Limestone County; and a report from Adjutant General James Davidson in which he recommends ending the period of martial law.]
9. Correspondence, December 1871
[Records include letters to Adjutant General James Davidson and the paymaster regarding financial matters; a letter from Adjutant General Davidson to Judge F.P. Wood requesting a statement regarding the circumstances for his presence in Limestone County, and his reply; letters regarding the special military tax and property seized to cover the tax on the people of Limestone County while under martial law; letters between Adjutant General Davidson and Capt. G.W. Farrow attempting to diffuse a letter published in the State Journal regarding mishandling of affairs in Limestone County; and an endorsement of French and Co. and their claim for reimbursement by Adjutant General Davidson addressed to Governor Edmund Davis.]
10. Correspondence, January-February 1872
[Records include letters to Adjutant General James Davidson and the paymaster regarding financial matters; documents related to supplies and finances during the period of martial law in Limestone County, including discrepancies in the reports of Lt. C.H. Welch; affidavits regarding lost or stolen property; letters to Adjutant General Davidson including an oath of office, reports of operations, and requests for office; and an affidavit from former Groesbeck mayor A.J. Zadek regarding money he won from paymaster Capt. A.D. Evans and Maj. Stanley Welch, who refused to pay, and board given to Judge J.W. Oliver which was never paid for.]
11. Correspondence, March-June 1872
[Records include letters to Adjutant General James Davidson and the paymaster regarding financial matters; letters to Adjutant General Davidson regarding supplies and commissions; powers of attorney; a letter requesting support for the start-up of a new Republican newspaper called The Standard; a letter from the sheriff of Red River County defending himself against detractors; a reward bulletin offering $50 for the capture of two stolen horses and the thieves; vouchers for guns and ammunition; and a letter from a mother requesting the State Police to retrieve her son who was taken by Edmund Raiford.]
12. Correspondence, July-September 1872
[Records include letters to Adjutant General James Davidson and others regarding financial matters; vouchers and receipts for guns and supplies; a letter ordering the commanding lieutenant of the San Saba County Minute Men to come to a gathering of minute companies to discuss better protection of the frontier; a letter signed by citizens of Milam Co. nominating E.M. Bean to form a battalion of mounted Rangers; a letter from Adjutant General Davidson to A.H. Longley, Esq. which requests him to muster in minute companies and lists the documents needed including a muster roll, an oath of office signed by all the men, a bond of $2000 to cover losses, and the proceedings of elections of officers; a signed bond to cover guns and ammunition; and letters from Lt. R.T. Rieger of Company B stating that his men refuse to scout unless paid for their first three months, and a report of a fight with a large band of Indians.]
13. Correspondence, October-December 1872
[Records include letters to Adjutant General Frank L. Britton and others regarding financial matters; a request from a police court in Calhoun County for an opinion on certain sections of the law; an affidavit regarding a Winchester carbine lost when Lt. George W. Stevens of Company B was wounded in a fight with Indians; a letter from supplier John C. Raymond stating that he cannot increase the account until he has some assurance of when he will be paid; and a request from R.M. Russell of the Land Office for an arrest and the return of two horses placed in pawn with him and then stolen.]
14. Correspondence, January-May 1873
[Records include vouchers and receipts for goods and services; a list of all State of Texas-owned arms in the field; an inventory of arms in the state arsenal; an inventory of items left in the care of the sheriff of Marion County; a power of attorney for men of Kerr County allowing their names to be placed on a muster roll; a letter from Brevet Lt. Col. E. Rice of the U.S. Army promoting a new way he has discovered to stack Winchester rifles using hooks; and a letter from Adjutant General Frank L. Britton concerning the beating of a teacher at a colored school in Coltharp by disguised men, in which he dispatches Pvt. James Davis of the State Police to identify the parties and bring them to justice.]
15. Correspondence, June-December 1873
[Records include letters to Adjutant General Frank L. Britton and others regarding financial matters; vouchers; documents related to $8000 in frontier defense bonds; a request for information about the organization of a company; a letter forwarding the muster roll and oath of office of a new company of minute men in Callahan County; letters related to powers of attorney; a handwritten bulletin advertising a $100 reward for the return of two horses and the capture of the thieves; and a list of horses and cattle stolen by Indians over the last two years in Kerr County.]
16. Correspondence, January-April 1874
[Records include letters to Adjutant General William Steele, Adjutant General Frank L. Britton, and Governor Richard Coke regarding financial matters, recommendations, and requests to form companies; letters from Capt. Leander McNelly regarding pay and operations of his company; petitions from the citizens of Erath County, Blanco County, and Dallas promoting a member of their community for office; letters from Adjutant General Steele regarding difficulty with finances; and letters between Adjutant General Steele and C.B. Raines regarding guns that Raines delivered without compensation for his trouble.]
Box Folder
401-392 1. Correspondence, May 1-15, 1874
[Records include documents related to the formation of the Frontier Battalion including general orders 1 and 2 which establish organization and command structure; letters between Adjutant General William Steele, Governor Richard Coke, and Maj. John B. Jones regarding set up and supplies for the Frontier Battalion; and letters recommending and applying for positions within the Frontier Battalion.]
2. Correspondence, May 16-31, 1874
[Records include letters from officers of the Frontier Battalion requesting information; correspondence between Adjutant General William Steele, Governor Richard Coke, Maj. John B. Jones, and Quartermaster Martin M. Kenney regarding the position of quartermaster; a petition from the citizens of Comanche County requesting protection from the John Wesley Hardin gang; a letter from Capt. John R. Waller of Company A regarding the pursuit of the John Wesley Hardin gang; and a requisition for $5000 for frontier defense signed by Governor Coke, Adjutant General Steele, and Adjutant General W.H. King.]
3. Correspondence, June 1-15, 1874
[Records include letters to Adjutant General William Steele and Maj. John B. Jones regarding muster rolls and supplies; a letter from Adjutant General Steele to Maj. Jones requesting scout reports with details about Indian depredations in order to justify the work of the Frontier Battalion to the next legislature; a letter from A Company reporting the capture of members of the John Wesley Hardin gang; a letter to Adjutant General Steele from Maj. Jones regarding new pistols and the ammunition required for them; and a letter from a citizen of Refugio reporting the murder of a white couple by Mexican bandits and the subsequent hunt for the culprits.]
4. Correspondence, June 16-30, 1874
[Records include correspondence with Maj. John B. Jones regarding supplies, enlistment, and company movements; a letter from Sgt J.V. Atkinson of Company A reporting the movement of captured members of the John Wesley Hardin gang to DeWitt County; a letter from Adjutant General William Steele reporting that Governor Richard Coke wants prisoners to be turned over to the nearest sheriff to cut costs; a letter from a citizen of Mason County complaining of cattle rustlers; and a letter from E. Remington & Sons advertising the cost of their breech loading rifles.]
5. Correspondence, July 1-15, 1874
[Records include a report from Maj. John B. Jones regarding the Lost Valley Fight; a letter from Maj. Jones regarding company location assignments; a letter offering a $200 bounty for cattle thieves; a special order regarding an escort for a state geologist; several letters from Reuben M. Potter regarding a monument for the Alamo and the inclusion of the names of Mexican soldiers who fought for Texas; and a list of names with capiases including one for John Wesley Hardin for carrying a pistol.]
6. Correspondence, July 16-31, 1874
[Records include appraisals of horses; letters from Maj. John B. Jones to Adjutant General William Steele concerning Indian movements after the events of the Lost Valley Fight; special orders issuing discharges; a letter from a private protesting his dishonorable discharge and the response from Adjutant General Steele; and letters from Capt. Warren Wallace regarding the pursuit of Alberto Garza and his party including a letter in Spanish requesting aid.]
7. Correspondence, August 1-15, 1874
[Records include a general order setting the numbers of officers and enlisted men in the Frontier Battalion; financial documents related to supplies; a letter requesting the discharge of an insubordinate soldier and the accompanying letter from his commanding officer, Capt. Neal Coldwell of Company F; a petition from the men of Company D requesting that a discharged corporal be reinstated; a letter from Capt. E.F. Ikard to Maj. John B. Jones reporting that a source identified the leader of the band of Indians Maj. Jones clashed with as Lone Wolf's party; a letter from Maj. Jones to Capt. Jeff Maltby of Company E about disorder in his company; and a letter from Capt. Leander McNelly regarding a trial related to the Sutton-Taylor feud.]
8. Correspondence, August 16-31, 1874
[Records include letters regarding supplies and movements of the companies of the Frontier Battalion; a report of operations from Capt. Wallace Warren in which he laments the difficulties inherent in tracking and arresting Mexican cattle thieves and a letter concerning charges from a Mexican counsel about border crossing; letters from Capt. C.R. Perry of Company D to Maj. John B. Jones regarding the pursuit of Indians and Mexican bandits and a report of scout regarding the Mexican presence along the Concho River; an affidavit about guns; a letter from Lt. F.H. Nelson requesting a transfer to Maj. Jones' personal guard; and a report from Adjutant General William Steele to Governor Richard Coke regarding the annual operations of his department.]
9. Correspondence, August 16-31, 1874
[Records include letters from the companies of the Frontier Battalion regarding supplies, financial information, discharges, and reports of operations; a letter from Lt. J.G. Connell of Company E regarding his absence from his company due to sickness; a letter from Reuben M. Potter regarding the costs and process of creating a metal plaque for a monument to the defenders of the Alamo; and a report from Adjutant General William Steele to Governor Richard Coke regarding the annual operations of his department.]
10. Correspondence, September 1-15, 1874
[Records include correspondence from the companies of the Frontier Battalion and Maj. John B. Jones regarding supplies, financial information, camp movements, and discharges; a petition from the citizens of Webb County to disband the company of Lt. R. Benavides; a letter to Maj. Jones regarding corrections to a letter published in the San Antonio Herald that was misinterpreted to cast aspersions on Capt. C.R. Perry of Company D; a general order listing capiases including one for John Hardin in Hill County for murder; a letter from Maj. Jones to Adjutant General William Steele regarding a deserter; a letter from Maj. Jones to Lt. F.H. Nelson of Company E informing Lt. Nelson that there are no open positions and he needs to return to his own company or resign; a general order regarding couriers that are being put into place to aid communication; a special order regarding several discharges and resignations including Lt. Nelson; and a petition from the citizens of Nueces to extend the contracts of the company of Capt. Warren Wallace.]
11. Correspondence, September 16-30, 1874
[Records include letters from Capt. Leander McNelly of the Special State Troops regarding the pursuit of John Wesley Hardin and Jim Taylor and the transport and protection of John Taylor; a letter from Capt. Warren Wallace stating that he will muster out his company unless he hears otherwise; a telegram from the mayor of Corpus Christi complaining that Capt. Wallace's men are drunk and disorderly and clashing with the police force; correspondence from the companies of the Frontier Battalion and Maj. John B. Jones about supplies, financial issues, and discharges; a letter from Lt. Telesforo Montes regarding an attack on a band of Indians that resulted in the killing of two braves, the capture of horses, and the rescue of an eight year old Mexican boy stolen earlier in the year; a report from Capt. Jeff Maltby of a flood that struck their camp; a letter from Maj. Jones to the San Saba News concerning a deserter; and a petition from the citizens of Webb County to keep Lt. R. Benevides and his men in the area.]
12. Correspondence, October 1-15, 1874
[Records include correspondence from the companies of the Frontier Battalion and Maj. John B. Jones regarding supplies, financial information, movements, promotions and discharges, and reports of operations; appraisals of horses; a letter from Adjutant General William Steele to Maj. Jones regarding a replacement for Capt. John R. Waller; and a report from Maj. Jones that laments the spread of fires that have wiped out all grass for grazing.]
13. Correspondence, October 16-31, 1874
[Records include correspondence from the companies of the Frontier Battalion and Maj. John B. Jones regarding supplies and arms, financial information, movements, promotions and discharges, and reports of operations; a letter from Capt. Leander McNelly of the Special State Troops requesting the appointment of a second lieutenant; a bond for arms; a letter from Lt. B.S. Foster of Company E regarding an attack by Indians on the camp horses; a letter from Capt. George W. Stevens listing reasons why his lieutenant should be discharged; and a general order to company commanders to prohibit sharing of subsistence and forage rations with camp followers.]
14. Correspondence, November 1-15, 1874
[Records include correspondence from the companies of the Frontier Battalion and Maj. John B. Jones regarding supplies and arms, financial information, and promotions and discharges; a letter from Adjutant General William Steele to Maj. Jones stating that Governor Richard Coke would like to consult Maj. Jones before writing to the legislature about frontier defense, and informing Maj. Jones that commissioners have taken Kickapoo from Kansas to Mexico to convince the Kickapoo of Mexico to return with them; letters and documents relating to charges against Capt. George W. Stevens by his former 1st lieutenant including Capt. Stevens' response, affidavits of his men, and a physician's letter that finds two individuals fit for duty; a petition from the citizens of Palo Pinto and Parker Counties to promote Lt. J.T. Wilson to captain of Company A; and a letter from the Consulate of the Republic of Mexico seeking information concerning charges and findings against men of Capt. Warren Wallace's Minute Company for crimes committed against citizens of Mexico in Texas.]
15. Correspondence, November 16-30, 1874
[Records include correspondence from the companies of the Frontier Battalion and Maj. John B. Jones regarding supplies and arms, financial information, promotions and discharges, and camp movements; an itemized list of services rendered by the Frontier Battalion since its organization; multiple accounts of a fight between the men of Companies D and C and a party of Comanches; an account from Capt. W.J. Maltby of a skirmish followed by a pursuit of a group of Indians that lasted several days; and a letter from Adjutant General William Steele to Maj. Jones regarding Governor Richard Coke's desire to consult Maj. Jones about frontier defense.]
16. Correspondence, November 16-30, 1874
[Records include correspondence from the companies of the Frontier Battalion and Maj. John B. Jones regarding supplies and arms, financial information, promotions and discharges, reports of operation, and camp movements; a letter from Maj. Jones to Adjutant General William Steele about the Indian fight led by Lt. D.W. Roberts of Company D and the captive being brought to Austin; a list of formal charges leveled against Capt. George W. Stevens; a letter in protest of demotion in ranks by a sergeant under Capt. Stevens; a general order mandating a reduction in force of all companies; a letter to Maj. Jones from Lt. J.T. Wilson explaining that he could not carry out Maj. Jones' orders because of Lt. J.W. Millican's conflicting orders; a statement of the number of miles traveled by the scouts of the six companies between June and November; and an account of Indian depredations in Menard County since May of 1872.]
17. Correspondence, December 1-15, 1874
[Records include correspondence from the companies of the Frontier Battalion and Maj. John B. Jones regarding supplies and arms, warrants, financial information, promotions and discharges, reports of operation, movements, and Indian activity; an overdraft notice for Capt. Martin M. Kenney and a letter from Adjutant General William Steele to Maj. Jones requesting him to see that Capt. Kenney gets his accounts in order; a letter from a member of the legislature recommending C.R. Perry for a command position; a letter to the presiding justices of the frontier counties from Maj. Jones requesting information on Indian depredations for the information of Governor Richard Coke and the legislature; a telegram to Maj. Jones from Lt. Pat Dolan regarding the presence of the Omaha train robbers in Eagle Pass; a list of officers to be disbanded in response to the reduction of force of the Frontier Battalion; a letter from Adjutant General Steele to Maj. Jones containing a statement of arms issued and a request for a report on the battalion; and a report of operations of command for the last six months.]
18. Correspondence, December 16-31, 1874
[Records include correspondence from the companies of the Frontier Battalion and Maj. John B. Jones regarding supplies and arms, financial information, discharges, monthly reports, and leave; a letter recommending extra fruit and vegetables for Company D as a "hygienic precaution" after the men came down with scurvy in October; reports written by Maj. Jones to Adjutant General Steele concerning the reductions of force in the Frontier Battalion; an estimate of the expenses of the Frontier Battalion for the months of December through February; and letters describing the Indian depredations during the last two years in Comanche, Montague, Wise, Jack, and Coleman Counties.]
Box Folder
401-393 1. Correspondence, January 1875
[Records include correspondence from the companies of the Frontier Battalion and Maj. John B. Jones regarding receipts, supplies, resignations and discharges, government officials qualifying for office, and monthly reports of operations; a letter to Adjutant General William Steele from Governor Elisha M. Pease regarding complaints of Capt. M.M. Kenny being overdrawn; affidavits concerning land certificates held by a soldier who fell at the Alamo; a report from Lt. D.W. Roberts of Company D regarding the benefits of shotguns in Indian fights.]
2. Correspondence, February 1875
[Records include correspondence from the companies of the Frontier Battalion and Maj. John B. Jones regarding receipts, monthly reports, Indian activity, and supplies; letter from Lt. J.T. Wilson of Company N requesting his company be disbanded due to unruly men; a notification to Juan Jimenes [sic] stating that Damaso Jimenes [sic] perished at the Alamo; a letter to Adjutant General William Steele regarding Capt. Kimball being believed to have faked illness in order to avoid the conflict at the Alamo; a letter from Maj. John B. Jones to Adjutant General Steele concerning legislators who were weak kneed on the subject of frontier defense; a letter from Lt. J.F. Wilson of Company A regarding a lack of funds to pay the men; and a letter notifying officers that accounts presented as debts against the state in lieu of funds are illegitimate unless warranted under specific circumstances.]
[Note: Damaso Jimenes is a misspelling of Damacio Jiménez]
3. Correspondence, March 1-15, 1875
[Records include correspondence from the companies of the Frontier Battalion and Maj. John B. Jones regarding supplies, movements of companies, discharges, and financial matters; a letter from Capt. Leander McNelly of the Special State Troops to Bolivar Pridgin about a recent article citing misconduct of McNelly's camp; a letter from Capt. Neal Coldwell to Maj. John B. Jones reporting an armed force of 200-300 men across the Rio Grande in Mexico whom he believes to be related to the conflict between Juan Cortina and José Carbajal; a letter to Adjutant General Steele listing three names of men from Logan County Kentucky who were killed at the Alamo; and a letter from an irate farmer seeking recompense for hay taken by the men of Company D, and a response from Lt. Daniel Roberts of Company D refuting the claim.]
4. Correspondence, March 16-31, 1875
[Records include correspondence from officers of the Frontier Battalion and Maj. John B. Jones regarding supplies, Indian activity, financial issues, receipts, discharges, and monthly reports; letters from Maj. Jones discussing the Texas Legislature cutting funds for frontier defense in half and the necessary cuts due to the new budget including the disbanding of companies, men potentially being paid through warrants for ninety cents on the dollar, and the inability to pay from May to August; and a report from Capt. Neal Coldwell to Maj. Jones requesting troops to be sent due to Mexicans threatening to burn Corsicana and complaining that the area is a difficult one to police due to an inability to distinguish between citizens of Mexican descent and bandits who come from Mexico.]
5. Correspondence, April 1875
[Records include correspondence from officers of the Frontier Battalion and Maj. John B. Jones regarding supplies, discharges, financial issues, and leave; several letters dealing with the repercussions of legislative budget cuts to frontier defense including the downsizing and elimination of companies; letters from Maj. Jones discussing the lack of funds to pay the men during the summer months; a telegram to Adjutant General William Steele from the sheriff of Corpus Christi requesting Leander McNelly's presence after the burning of five ranches by masked men; and a court document with several verdicts in various cases.]
6. Correspondence, May 1875
[Records include correspondence from officers of the Frontier Battalion and Maj. John B. Jones concerning financial issues, supplies, appointments, and reports of operations; a letter from Capt. Leander McNelly of the Special State Troops reporting Capt. Neal Coldwell's inability to cross the Rio Grande due to high waters and sightings of Juan Cortina on the opposite bank hanging two men who killed one of Cortina's cattle thieves; a claim against Capt. McNelly and his men for four horses; the resignation of Lt. Ira Long; a letter from a Kerr County judge to Maj. Jones reporting suspicious men in the area including reports of John Wesley Hardin; and a letter to Adjutant General William Steele reporting a conflict with Indians in Lost Valley that began with the theft of horses from Loving Ranch.]
7. Correspondence, June 1875
[Records include correspondence from officers of the Frontier Battalion and Maj. John B. Jones regarding supplies, financial issues, and reports of scouts; a sworn statement regarding the retrieval of corpses after a conflict between Capt. Leander McNelly's Special State Troops and a group of Mexican raiders; a telegram from Capt. McNelly to Adjutant General William Steele reporting the killing of twelve raiders and the capture of two hundred sixty-five cattle; an affidavit and court proceedings in the case of Margarito Veterrcourt; a report of horses stolen since May; and a letter from a man who believes Lt. Ira Long could be his missing brother.]
8. Correspondence, July 1-15, 1875
[Records include correspondence from officers of the Frontier Battalion and Maj. John B. Jones regarding supplies and guns, financial issues, scouting reports, and discharges; a letter by Maj. Jones to Adjutant General William Steele requesting money in order to increase the number of companies to five for two months and stating a preference to arm the men with Springfield Carbines; and a letter from Maj. Jones to Adjutant General Steele that reports Indian depredations on the Llano and robbers in Menard County.]
9. Correspondence, July 16-31, 1875
[Records include correspondence from officers of the Frontier Battalion and Maj. John B. Jones regarding supplies and guns, financial issues, and scouting reports; and a letter from Capt. Neal Coldwell to Maj. Jones that reports suspicious characters passing through the area and a conversation with the owner of Loving Ranch who believes that his stolen horses are being sold at government auction after they are captured.]
10. Correspondence, August 1875
[Records include correspondence from officers of the Frontier Battalion and Maj. John B. Jones regarding supplies and guns, financial issues, the movement of companies, and reports of operations; letters from Capt. Leander McNelly regarding a wagon of supplies belonging to the Special State Troops that was seized due to suspicion that the corn on-board was brought over from Mexico; notarized statements from two men who wish to claim the pay of their sons who were killed in service; a special order that demoted Neal Coldwell to a lieutenant due to budget and authorized Ira Long to create a new company; and a letter from Maj. Jones to Lt. Long with instructions for raising a company.]
11. Correspondence, September 1875
[Records include correspondence from officers of the Frontier Battalion and Maj. John B. Jones regarding supplies and financial issues; a letter from Maj. Jones to Lt. G.W. Stevens of Company B in which he states that they must have some scalps to show for the work they have been doing or the next legislature may stop their pay; and correspondence between Maj. Jones and Adjutant General William Steele regarding the Mason County War.]
12. Correspondence, October 1-15, 1875
[Records include correspondence from officers of the Frontier Battalion and Maj. John B. Jones regarding supplies, financial issues, and discharges; a special order requesting a company be stationed at Cold Springs and a list of citizens willing to lend aid; a letter from Maj. Jones requesting that his old letters be sent to him, particularly those related to Al Roberts' gang of cow thieves; a letter to Maj. Jones from Daniel Beale claiming that the convention is on the side of frontier protection and will not prevent the next legislature from making proper appropriations; and a petition by the people of Loyal Valley regarding a large group of men who have been searching their homes claiming they were operating under the sheriff's orders.]
13. Correspondence, October 16-31, 1875
[Records include correspondence from officers of the Frontier Battalion and Maj. John B. Jones regarding supplies, financial issues, and arrests; a letter from Telesforo Montes to Maj. Jones discussing the set up of a new company; a request for discharge forms and vouchers as companies are reduced; a letter from Maj. Jones to Adjutant General Steele reporting the state of affairs in Mason and a conflict of interests discovered within Lt. Daniel Roberts' Company; a letter from Maj. Jones to Lt. Neal Coldwell reporting that Lt. Ira Long will be left in charge at Mason County; and correspondence between Maj. Jones and Adjutant General Steele regarding accusations that Jones took sides during the events at Mason County.]
14. Correspondence, November 1-15, 1875
[Records include correspondence from officers of the Frontier Battalion and Maj. John B. Jones regarding supplies and financial issues; a letter from the mayor of Camargo, Mexico, requesting an end to the war on communities across the Rio Grande and asserting that the governments will deal with the cattle thieves; a letter from Capt. Leander McNelly of the Special State Troops in pursuit of cattle thieves near Brownsville; notes on Indian depredations including Lone Wolf and the raids based out of reservations; a letter from J.C. Loving listing all Indian depredations since June 1873; and a letter from Maj. Jones to Adjutant General Steele which reports that the rangers have made Coleman County safe enough that the frontier in the area is being settled rapidly.]
15. Correspondence, November 16-31, 1875
[Records include correspondence from officers of the Frontier Battalion and Maj. John B. Jones regarding supplies, financial issues, and reports of operations; a typed letter addressed to Hon. E.B. Pickett, the President of the Constitutional Convention of Texas, which complains of the depredations of border crossers and hostilities supported by Mexico; and correspondence from members of the United States Army regarding Capt. Leander McNelly's pursuit of cattle thieves across the Rio Grande.]
16. Correspondence, December 1-15, 1875
[Records include correspondence from officers of the Frontier Battalion and Maj. John B. Jones regarding supplies, financial issues, and reduction of companies; two reports about the events that took place on the banks of the Rio Grande when Capt. Leander McNelly of the Special State Troops pursued cattle thieves into Mexico; a letter from Lt. Neal Coldwell to Maj. Jones regarding the pursuit of cattle thieves, the arrest of a man who harbored them, and the lawsuit pressed against Lt. Coldwell by that man; and a request for stronger ranger presence in Mason County.]
17. Correspondence, December 16-31, 1875
[Records include correspondence from officers of the Frontier Battalion and Maj. John B. Jones regarding supplies, financial issues, company relocations, and discharges; a letter regarding a name correction for the Alamo memorial; a letter requesting a full force of seventy-five men in Young County; and a letter to Maj. Jones from Lt. Neal Coldwell stating he may be forced to resign if his company stays in its current location long.]
Box Folder
401-394 1. Correspondence, January 1-15, 1876
[Records include correspondence from officers of the Frontier Battalion and Maj. John B. Jones regarding supplies, financial issues, arrests made, and reports of operations; a letter from Mrs. M.P. Logan to Adjutant General William Steele requesting a record of the names of all Texas Rangers who fought in the Mexican American War; letters regarding the resignation of Lt. Neal Coldwell; a report about the delivery of stolen horses; a letter concerning the Alamo monument; and a report of an attack on the Tio Cano Ranch by eight Mexicans.]
2. Correspondence, January 16-31, 1876
[Records include correspondence from officers of the Frontier Battalion and Maj. John B. Jones regarding supplies, financial issues, and discharges; an affidavit about the loss of two guns; letters regarding Lt. Ira Long and company moving to Burnett County to continue to deal with the after effects of the Mason County War; a resolution put forth by the people of Mason County protesting an article about Mason County in a Fredericksburg paper; and a letter responding to a call for information about the fallen soldiers at the Alamo put forth by the Galveston News.]
3. Correspondence, February 1876
[Records include correspondence from officers of the Frontier Battalion and Maj. John B. Jones regarding supplies, financial issues, discharges from service, and reports of operations; a letter from David Doole to Maj. Jones containing political updates, supply costs, updates on Mason County, and praise for Lt. Ira Long; and letters regarding horse theft and shootings from officers of the Frontier Battalion.]
4. Correspondence, March 1-15, 1876
[Records include correspondence from officers of the Frontier Battalion and Maj. John B. Jones regarding supplies, financial issues, camp movements, and appointment recommendations; a letter from Telesforo Montes to Adjutant General Steele reporting the theft of horses by Indians on two occasions; and a letter from David Doole to Maj. Jones regarding a shooting.]
5. Correspondence, March 16-31, 1876
[Records include correspondence from officers of the Frontier Battalion and Maj. John B. Jones regarding supplies, financial issues, and reports of operations; a letter correcting and adding to the names for the Alamo monument; and a letter from Lt. D.W. Roberts of Company D asking to reinstate J.L. Bird who was dishonorably discharged.]
6. Correspondence, April 1876
[Records include correspondence from officers of the Frontier Battalion and Maj. John B. Jones regarding supplies, financial issues, and medical concerns; two letters in Spanish regarding Lt. Telesforo Montes including a complaint from one of his men; a report of scout from Lt. Montes describing a pursuit of Indians who stole horses; a letter from Maj. Jones to Adjutant General William Steele reporting the loss of sixteen carbines in a fire; a report by Lt. Neal Coldwell of Company F regarding Indian depredations; and correspondence from Capt. Leander McNelly of the Special State Troops to Adjutant General Steele regarding the capture of Matamoros, Mexico, by Porfirio Diaz.]
7. Correspondence, May 1876
[Records include correspondence from officers of the Frontier Battalion and Maj. John B. Jones regarding supplies, financial issues, Indian depredations, and discharges; letters from Capt. Leander McNelly of the Special State Troops to Adjutant General William Steele detailing the movements of bands of criminals and his efforts to capture them; a letter from Capt. McNelly to Adjutant General Steele reporting Porfirio Diaz and his men have left Matamoros, Mexico, to capture Monterrey, Mexico, and a reward to retake Matamoros has been offered by the Mexican government; and a letter of permission allowing twenty-two Pawnee braves to leave the reservation for a buffalo hunt signed by U.S. Indian Agent A.C. Williams.]
8. Correspondence, June 1876
[Records include correspondence from officers of the Frontier Battalion and Maj. John B. Jones regarding financial issues and camp movements; a telegram from Capt. Leander McNelly of the Special State Troops to Adjutant General William Steele regarding the arrest of King Fisher and members of his gang; and a petition from the citizens of Clarendon to Governor Richard Coke requesting the presence of the rangers to protect them from two thousand Indians who refuse to return to their reservation without a more satisfactory treaty.]
9. Correspondence, July 1876
[Records include correspondence from officers of the Frontier Battalion and Maj. John B. Jones regarding promotions and appointments, supplies, and financial issues; the oath of office for Lt. Jesse L. Hall; a letter from Capt. Leander McNelly of the Special State Troops to Adjutant General William Steele requesting twenty to thirty days of leave for his men; a letter from the sheriff of Cameron County to Adjutant General Steele asking what is to be done with the deserter who remains in jail at the cost of the state; a petition making Lt. Hall the 1st lieutenant for Capt. McNelly's company; a warrant; letters concerning legislature appropriations; and letters correcting names to appear on the Alamo monument.]
10. Correspondence, August 1876
[Records include correspondence from officers of the Frontier Battalion and Maj. John B. Jones regarding supplies, financial issues, employment, and Indian sightings; a requisition for three thousand dollars to suppress lawlessness and crime; a petition for protection of Uvalde County against Indians; a letter from Maj. Jones to Adjutant General William Steele reporting the pursuit of sixty Indians who burned the countryside making them impossible to track; a memorandum of operations from Maj. Jones reporting activity for the last year including Mason County arrests; and the resignation of Lt. Ira Long.]
11. Correspondence, September 1876
[Records include correspondence from officers of the Frontier Battalion and Maj. John B. Jones regarding supplies, financial issues, and the organization of two new companies; a letter from a father seeking recompense for the murder of his son by Capt. Leander McNelly's men; letters from Capt. McNelly of the Special State Troops to Adjutant General Steele regarding a murder and the guarding of a court in Oakville; and a letter reporting that Capt. McNelly sent twenty men to arrest King Fisher and his men.]
12. Correspondence, October 1876
[Records include correspondence from officers of the Frontier Battalion and Maj. John B. Jones regarding supplies, financial issues, Indian sightings, and reports of operations; several letters asking when protection will be sent to El Paso after two men were killed and a number of stock had been stolen; a Frio County petition for protection from Indians and outlaws; a medical note excusing Capt. Leander McNelly from service due to an affliction of the lungs; and a man writing to collect his brother's pay for the time spent captured in Mier, Mexico.]
13. Correspondence, November 1-15, 1876
[Records include correspondence from officers of the Frontier Battalion and Maj. John B. Jones regarding supplies, financial issues, reports of operations, arrests, and discharges; a letter from a physician to Adjutant General William Steele regarding Capt. Leander McNelly's medical care for April and May; a petition from the citizens of Menard County requesting that the nearest company of rangers move closer; a reply to the Menard County petition turning down the request; a letter from the citizens of Montague asking for Lt. George W. Campbell's Company B to stay in the area; and a request from Lt. L.B. Wright wishing to hire a servant at state expense.]
14. Correspondence, November 16-30, 1876
[Records include correspondence from officers of the Frontier Battalion and Maj. John B. Jones regarding supplies, financial issues, and camp movements; a letter from Maj. Jones to Adjutant General William Steele reporting that Lt. George W. Campbell's Company B has been asked to guard county jail until prisoners are disposed of, but he believes it to be a better use of men to transport the prisoners to a more secure jail; letters from Capt. Leander McNelly of the Special State Troops to Adjutant General Steele reporting movements of men, tips on local outlaws such as King Fisher, and his health; and a formal complaint against Lt. B.S. Foster of Company E signed by the citizens of Coleman County.]
15. Correspondence, December 1-15, 1876
[Records include correspondence from officers of the Frontier Battalion and Maj. John B. Jones regarding supplies, financial issues, and monthly returns; a public notice about two deserters, posted by Maj. Jones, to warn against purchasing their pay vouchers; a letter from Lt. William J. Maltby of Company E reporting Indian depredations in Callahan County; a letter to Adjutant General William Steele reporting the theft of one hundred horses and requesting help; and a letter from Adjutant General Steele to Maj. Jones reporting a siting of stage robbers from Texas in New Mexico.]
16. Correspondence, December 1-15, 1876
[Records include correspondence from officers of the Frontier Battalion and Maj. John B. Jones regarding supplies; letters reporting the death of men who resisted arrest; a letter from Maj. Jones wishing to promote Lt. Neal Coldwell to captain of Company A; and a report on the state of affairs in Montague where Lt. George W. Campbell of Company B is to escort prisoners.]
17. Correspondence, December 16-31, 1876
[Records include correspondence from officers of the Frontier Battalion and Maj. John B. Jones regarding supplies, financial issues, and reports of operations; a letter applying for position in the Frontier Battalion; and a letter from Maj. Jones listing the reward and description of a man who is wanted in Stephens County.]
Box Folder
401-395 1. Correspondence, January 1-15, 1877
[Records include correspondence from officers of the Frontier Battalion and Maj. John B. Jones regarding supplies, financial issues, Indian sightings, discharges, transfers, and leave; a letter from Lt. Pat Dolan of Company F to Maj. Jones reporting Indians in the area on the Guadalupe River; a letter reporting the cashing of a stolen voucher; letters to Adjutant General William Steele regarding a raid by a group of ten Indians, or outlaws dressed as Indians, who stole fifty horses and killed two boys in Kimble and Kerr County; and a petition from the citizens of Coleman County and the surrounding area asking to keep a company of rangers in the area.]
2. Correspondence, January 16-31, 1877
[Records include correspondence from officers of the Frontier Battalion and Maj. John B. Jones regarding supplies and financial issues; a list of names for the Alamo monument compiled by former governor Elisha M. Pease; a letter from a physician to Adjutant General William Steele listing Capt. Leander McNelly as unfit for service; an affidavit for two missing mules; a letter from an attorney in Goliad to Adjutant General Steele about the potential mustering out of the State Troops; a letter from Lt. Pat Dolan of Company F to Maj. Jones regarding misconduct of two of his men; a petition from the people of Live Oak County to Governor Richard B. Hubbard requesting that Capt. McNelly's company be retained; and a report from Lt. Dolan to Maj. Jones regarding Indian activity and a conflict between ranchers over the changing of brands.]
3. Correspondence, February 1-15, 1877
[Records include correspondence from officers of the Frontier Battalion and Maj. John B. Jones regarding supplies, arrests, and financial issues; and letters regarding the disbanding of the Special Force of Rangers under Capt. Leander McNelly.]
4. Correspondence, February 1-15, 1877
[Records include correspondence from officers of the Frontier Battalion and Maj. John B. Jones regarding supplies, discharges, financial issues, arrests made, and reports of operations; a scout record; and a report from Lt. Frank M. Moore of Company D to Maj. Jones regarding a dispute over cattle that were rebranded.]
5. Correspondence, February 16-28, 1877
[Records include correspondence from officers of the Frontier Battalion and Maj. John B. Jones regarding supplies, financial issues, arrests made, and reports of operations; a list of questions from Governor Richard B. Hubbard to Adjutant General William Steele about Capt. Leander McNelly's company of Special State Troops; a letter to Maj. Jones in support of Lt. B.S. Foster and Company E in regard to a petition to remove them from Coleman County; a letter to Maj. Jones listing every thief in Kimble County; a statement from William Horn about a suspicious character; a letter from Lt. Pat Dolan of Company F discussing the theft and possible rebranding of cattle; and a letter requesting that Maj. Jones reconsider removing the ranger camp from Kimble County as the area has become overrun with lawlessness.]
6. Correspondence, March 1-15, 1877
[Records include correspondence from officers of the Frontier Battalion and Maj. John B. Jones regarding supplies, financial issues, and arrests made; a letter from Attorney General H.H. Boone to a lawyer in Eagle Pass regarding legal action in the death of a man which resulted from a fight with some of the men of Capt. Leander McNelly's Special State Troops; a letter to Adjutant General William Steele from the justice of the peace of San Patricio County complaining about a member of the Special State Troops overstepping his bounds with a reply from Steele on the reverse; a letter from Lt. Jesse L. Hall defending his men against the allegations in San Patricio County; and a document granting power of attorney for all the men of Company C to Capt. John C. Sparks.]
7. Correspondence, March 16-31, 1877
[Records include correspondence from officers of the Frontier Battalion and Maj. John B. Jones regarding supplies, arrests made, financial issues, and reports of operations; a letter from Dresden to Adjutant General William Steele requesting certified copies of the orders Capt. Leander McNelly and Lt. John B. Armstrong of the Special State Troops were operating under when his son was killed resisting arrest; a letter from an attorney from Eagle Pass in support of Capt. McNelly and Lt. Armstrong; a letter from Adjutant General Steele to Maj. Jones regarding a petition in Coleman County to remove Lt. B.S. Foster and Company E; letters regarding troubles in Kimble County and the growing Horrell-Higgins feud in Lampasas County; a letter from Kerrville to Maj. Jones reporting that John Wesley Hardin may be in the area; a general order to the Frontier Battalion in regard to potentially stolen cattle brands; and an order from Maj. Jones relocating Lt. B.S. Foster to Kickapoo Springs.]
8. Correspondence, April 1-15, 1877
[Records include correspondence from officers of the Frontier Battalion and Maj. John B. Jones regarding supplies, reports of operations, arrests made, and financial issues; petitions and letters requesting the presence of rangers in Frio County, Coleman County, and Camp Wood; several letters describing trouble in Kimble County including the death of Dick Dublin; a letter to Capt. John C. Sparks of Company C about suspected corruption in Hamilton County; and letters regarding trouble in Lampasas County related to the Horrell-Higgins feud.]
9. Correspondence, April 16-30, 1877
[Records include correspondence from officers of the Frontier Battalion and Maj. John B. Jones regarding supplies and financial issues; a letter written in defense of Lt. Pat Dolan of Company F signed by three former prisoners; a letter from a private of the Special State Troops requesting the payment of a reward for two prisoners he brought in; several letters detailing arrests including one from Maj. Jones to Adjutant General William Steele reporting that twenty-six had been caught including Dell and Dick Dublin; and a list of all arrests made in April, including Rol Dublin.]
10. Correspondence, April 16-30, 1877
[Records include correspondence from officers of the Frontier Battalion and Maj. John B. Jones regarding supplies, Indian sightings, and financial issues; a petition signed by the ladies of Kimble County asking to keep Lt. Frank M. Moore's Company D in the area; several letters concerning arrests and prisoner transport; a petition from Coleman County to keep Lt. B.S. Foster of Company E in the area; letters from Maj. Jones regarding operations in Kimble County; and a letter from Lt. Pat Dolan of Company F to Maj. Jones in defense of himself due to allegations of misconduct.]
11. Correspondence, May 1-15, 1877
[Records include correspondence from officers of the Frontier Battalion and Maj. John B. Jones regarding supplies, arrests made, and financial issues; telegrams from Lt. Jesse L. Hall of the Special State Troops to Adjutant General William Steele regarding arrests made; telegrams and letters to Adjutant General Steele from Maj. Jones reporting forty-one arrests and twenty-five indictments in Kimble County; a telegram from Lt. Jesse L. Hall asking if he can cross into Mexico to capture horse thieves; a petition in support of Lt. Pat Dolan of Company F signed by citizens of Uvalde County; an appraisal of horses; a letter from Adjutant General Steele to Maj. Jones indicating that Governor Richard B. Hubbard is pleased with his success; and telegrams regarding prisoners escaping from the Brownwood jail.]
12. Correspondence, May 16-31, 1877
[Records include correspondence from officers of the Frontier Battalion and Maj. John B. Jones regarding supplies and financial issues; correspondence regarding the jail break from the Brownwood jail; letters and a petition to keep the Special State Troops in service; a report of scout from Lt. Jesse L. Hall which reports thirty-three arrests; and a report by Maj. Jones of the investigation into charges against Lt. B.S. Foster of Company E by the citizens of Coleman County.]
13. Correspondence, May 16-31, 1877
[Records include correspondence from officers of the Frontier Battalion and Maj. John B. Jones regarding supplies, financial issues, and arrests made; letters regarding capiases and rewards; a petition to Governor Richard B. Hubbard to allow men of the Special State Troops to guard the prisoners in Eagle Pass; a letter concerning stolen cattle which details brands; a telegram from Maj. Jones to Adjutant General William Steele reporting the pursuit of the escaped prisoners from Brownwood; and a telegram asking Adjutant General Steele if there will be a guard for court held in DeWitt County.]
14. Correspondence, June 1-15, 1877
[Records include correspondence from officers of the Frontier Battalion and Maj. John B. Jones regarding supplies, travel, and financial issues; letters and a general order from Maj. Jones reporting the resignation of Lt. B.S. Foster and the attachment of Company E into Company A for the time being; letters from Lt. Jesse L. Hall of the Special State Troops to Adjutant General William Steele concerning prisoners, capiases, and travel; a letter from Maj. Jones to Adjutant General Steele regarding the Horrell-Higgins feud in Lampasas County; a copy of a voucher for pay for medical services rendered; and the resignation of Lt. B.S. Foster.]
15. Correspondence, June 16-30, 1877
[Records include correspondence from officers of the Frontier Battalion and Maj. John B. Jones regarding supplies, reports of operations, financial issues, and discharges; letters regarding the trouble in Lampasas County related to the Horrell-Higgins Feud; a special order sending men from Company A to Taylor due to requests from citizens; a letter to Adjutant General William Steele regarding money and supplies donated to keep the Special State Troops operational; petitions signed by citizens of Menard, Kimble, and Mason Counties to promote L.P. Sieker as commander of Company D; and petitions from the citizens of Atascosa, Karnes, and DeWitt Counties to keep Lt. Jesse L. Hall and the Special State Troops in service.]
16. Correspondence, July 1-15, 1877
[Records include correspondence from officers of the Frontier Battalion and Maj. John B. Jones regarding financial issues and discharges; a letter to Maj. Jones from a wife whose husband left to join the Frontier Battalion without providing for her; letters regarding a potential jail break in Houston; a letter from Maj. Jones addressing misconduct of Capt. John C. Sparks of Company C; a letter from Capt. Sparks in his own defense; a letter from Maj. Jones to a man owed money by a deserter from the Frontier Battalion explaining that the state is not held responsible for purchases by the men; letters regarding a case of habeas corpus involving Maj. Jones and Lt. N.O. Reynolds in Lampasas County; a letter from Lt. Pat Dolan of Company F that reports that John Wesley Hardin is headed toward Laredo; and letters relating to the Horrell-Higgins feud.]
17. Correspondence, July 16-31, 1877
[Records include correspondence from officers of the Frontier Battalion and Maj. John B. Jones regarding supplies, financial issues, arrests made, and reports of operations; a petition from members of Companies A and C to reinstate Henry Maltimore; a letter from Pvt. M.B. Davis responding to accusations that he left his wife without the ability to support herself; a petition signed by citizens of Brown County requesting Capt. John C. Sparks of Company C station some men in their area for protection; a telegram from Sgt. O.S. Watson to Adjutant General William Steele reporting that Mariano Escobedo is recruiting Mexicans at Rio Grande City to invade Mexico; a letter from Maj. Jones reporting a shooting believed to be related to the Horrell-Higgins feud and a subsequent letter reporting the arrest of the entire Horrell party; and a letter of truce from the Horrells to the Higgins family.]
Box Folder
401-396 1. Correspondence, August 1-15, 1877
[Records include correspondence regarding arrests made by the Frontier Battalion and the Special State Troops; a letter in response to the Horrell letter of truce in which the Higgins party promises to lay down arms as well; a request for ranger support while the town of Hamilton is between sheriffs; a flyer for an $800 reward for the capture of a murderer; a letter from a former member of Company F protesting his discharge; and a letter regarding Thomas Pickett of Frontier Battalion Company B disturbing the peace in Young County.]
2. Correspondence, August 1-15, 1877
[Records include correspondence from officers of the Frontier Battalion and Maj. John B. Jones regarding supplies and financial issues; a general order concerning the reorganization of the Frontier Battalion; a letter concerning the escape of a man from the Alamo; correspondence regarding arrests made by the Frontier Battalion and the Special State Troops; and a report of scout for a detachment of the Special State Troops under Sgt. N.O. Reynolds.]
3. Correspondence, August 16-31, 1877
[Records include correspondence from officers of the Frontier Battalion and Maj. John B. Jones regarding supplies, arrests made, and financial issues; a recommendation by Maj. Jones to promote Sgt. N.O. Reynolds to lieutenant and commander of Company E; a request for troops in Kim County; and a report of operations from Maj. Jones in which he discusses the state of the Mexican population along the border post-revolution.]
4. Correspondence, August 16-31, 1877
[Records include correspondence from officers of the Frontier Battalion and Maj. John B. Jones regarding supplies, reorganization, and financial issues; telegrams from Capt. Jesse L. Hall of the Special State Troops regarding extradition of escaped prisoners; telegrams from Lt. John B. Armstrong of the Special State Troops urging Adjutant General William Steele to forward requisition for John Wesley Hardin to the governor of Alabama; a telegram from Lt. Armstrong relating that he captured Hardin in Pensacola, Florida; a letter retracting a previous endorsement for L. Sieker to command Company D; petitions and letters asking for the promotion of W.W. Worcester as commander of Company D; and an itemized list of disbursements from the Office of the Adjutant General.]
5. Correspondence, September 1-15, 1877
[Records include correspondence from officers of the Frontier Battalion and Maj. John B. Jones regarding supplies and financial issues; letters discussing the identification of a wanted man named James Quigley; a telegram reporting that Capt. Leander McNelly is dying; a letter asking for appointment as the commander of Company D from L.P. Sieker; letters from Lt. Jesse L. Hall of the Special State Troops reporting Mexican affairs; a letter from a former prisoner claiming to have knowledge of a massive prison break with possible ties to the Knights of the Golden Circle; and a petition signed by citizens of Mason County to promote L.P. Sieker.]
6. Correspondence, September 1-15, 1877
[Records include correspondence from officers of the Frontier Battalion and Maj. John B. Jones regarding supplies, financial issues, camp movements, and warrants; the resignation of Lt. Frank M. Moore of Company D; a note from Capt. Leander McNelly's widow requesting his accounts against the state; and a letter regarding the escape of a soldier from the Alamo.]
7. Correspondence, September 16-30, 1877
[Records include correspondence from officers of the Frontier Battalion and Maj. John B. Jones regarding supplies, financial issues, and camp movements; a letter assigning Sgt. W.W. Worcester to temporary command of Company D; a letter regarding the misconduct of Thomas Pickett of Company B; letters regarding the pursuit and transport of prisoners; a dishonorable discharge; a recommendation from Maj. Jones for D.W. Roberts to take command of Company D; and a letter concerning further refinement of the list of fallen Alamo combatants.]
8. Correspondence, October 1-15, 1877
[Records include correspondence from officers of the Frontier Battalion and Maj. John B. Jones regarding supplies, discharges, financial issues, and reports of operations; several letters regarding the pursuit of fugitives; a letter from Capt. Neal Coldwell of Company A regarding the fitness of his men for promotion to officer; and letters concerning a description of the Omaha train robbers, AKA Sam Bass and his party.]
9. Correspondence, October 16-31, 1877
[Records include correspondence from officers of the Frontier Battalion and Maj. John B. Jones regarding supplies, financial issues, discharges from service, and reports of operations; and a letter from Adjutant General William Steele directing Maj. Jones to El Paso County to investigate the recent trouble related to the Salt War of San Elizario.]
10. Correspondence, November 1877
[Records include correspondence from officers of the Frontier Battalion and Maj. John B. Jones regarding supplies, reports of operations, and financial issues; correspondence related to the Salt War of San Elizario; a valuation of horses owned by the men stationed at San Elizario; a report from Lt. Pat Dolan of Company F which notes the arrest of King Fisher; and a letter from Capt. Neal Coldwell of Company A which details the depredations of Indians in 1876-1877.]
11. Correspondence, December 1-15, 1877
[Records include correspondence from officers of the Frontier Battalion and Maj. John B. Jones regarding supplies and financial issues; a letter from Lt. G.W. Campbell of Company B which details the depredations of Mexicans and Indians since 1866; and a report from Lt. Pat Dolan of Company F, Lt. N.O. Reynolds of Company E, and Capt. D.W. Roberts of Company D of all Indian depredations in 1876-1877.]
12. Correspondence, December 1-15, 1877
[Records include correspondence from officers of the Frontier Battalion and Maj. John B. Jones regarding supplies, discharges, financial issues, and camp movements; a complaint against Capt. John C. Sparks of Company C; a letter from Lt. Pat Dolan of Company F reporting a sighting of some of the Omaha train robbers including Sam Bass; and court documents relating to the verdicts of felony cases.]
13. Correspondence, December 16-31, 1877
[Records include correspondence from officers of the Frontier Battalion and Maj. John B. Jones regarding discharges and promotions, supplies, and financial issues; a petition signed by citizens of Menard County requesting that L.P. Sieker be appointed commanding officer of Company D; a letter justifying an arrest made by Maj. Jones; a petition signed by citizens of Laredo and Webb Counties requesting that a detachment of Company D be allowed to stay in the area for protection; telegrams from Maj. Jones to Lt. J.B. Tays of Company C requesting information about events in San Elizario; a report of the troubles in El Paso County related to the Salt War of San Elizario written by a local sheriff; and a report of scout by Lt. Jesse L. Hall of the Special State Troops regarding his pursuit of the Omaha train robbers including Sam Bass.]
14. Correspondence, January 1-15, 1878
[Records include correspondence from officers of the Frontier Battalion and Maj. John B. Jones regarding discharges, supplies, financial issues, and reports of operations; a letter from Capt. Jesse L. Hall of the Special State Troops acknowledging his promotion and arguing the benefit of keeping his company in service; a letter from Lt. N.O. Reynolds reporting the events that led to "three negroes and a girl" being shot resisting arrest, as well as subsequent correspondence related to the event; a letter and two petitions signed by members of the Frontier Battalion regarding three former rangers asking to be reinstated after having been discharged; a letter from the sheriff of Harris County reporting that he is assisting a man looking to arrest John Hardin; and a letter from Maj. Jones to Lt. J.B. Tays of Company C regarding fortification for the troubles in San Elizario.]
15. Correspondence, January 16-31, 1878
[Records include correspondence from officers of the Frontier Battalion and Maj. John B. Jones regarding supplies, discharges, and financial issues; a telegram reporting the death of Dick Dublin; and a statement signed by officers of Clay County requesting ranger support in the area.]
16. Correspondence, February 1-15, 1878
[Records include correspondence from officers of the Frontier Battalion and Maj. John B. Jones regarding supplies, financial issues, and discharges; reports of operations from Capt. Jesse L. Hall of the Special State Troops; a general order from Adjutant General William Steele requesting all arrests be listed on monthly returns; a general order requiring all supplies listed as unserviceable to be disposed of; a letter from Adjutant General Steele ordering Maj. Jones to relocate to El Paso County to investigate trouble in San Elizario; a bond for thirty sharps carbines and thirty sets of equipment; and a letter from the sheriff of Fayette County reporting the description of two men and a $100 reward for either.]
17. Correspondence, February 16-28, 1878
[Records include correspondence from officers of the Frontier Battalion and Maj. John B. Jones regarding supplies, financial issues, and reports of operations; a letter from Reuben M. Potter commenting on the latest accounts of possible escapes from the Alamo; a general order by command of Governor Richard B. Hubbard that all state troops will leave behind their arms when in cities, towns, or places of amusement; correspondence between Adjutant General William Steele and Maj. Jones regarding trouble in San Elizario; and a special order requiring several members of Company C to give evidence in regard to homicides in San Elizario to an extradition agent, and related correspondence.]
18. Correspondence, March 1-15, 1878
[Records include correspondence from officers of the Frontier Battalion and Maj. John B. Jones regarding supplies, discharges, reports of operations, and financial issues; letters and telegrams regarding a large claim against Capt. Jesse L. Hall and the Special State Troops; and a statement from the people of San Elizario and El Paso County addressed to the Commission of Investigation of the United States and the State of Texas.]
19. Correspondence, March 16-31, 1878
[Records include correspondence from officers of the Frontier Battalion and Maj. John B. Jones regarding supplies, financial issues, discharges, and arrests made; a letter from a woman stating that her husband and daughter were killed by members of Company E; a document titled Result of Operations of Frontier Battalion which lists fights, arrests, and deaths broken down by demographic; a letter from Maj. Jones stating an intent to submit a minority report on the events and losses in San Elizario; a petition from the citizens of San Elizario to have a company stationed nearby for protection; a letter from Lt. N.O. Reynolds of Company E warning of a potential indictment of his men; a document regarding the appropriations allotted to the Frontier Battalion; and the minority report written by Maj. Jones regarding events in San Elizario.]
Box Folder
401-397 1. Correspondence, April 1-15, 1878
[Records include correspondence from officers of the Frontier Battalion and Maj. John B. Jones regarding supplies, financial issues, semi monthly reports, and discharges; a report of lawlessness in Baylor County; a letter from Maj. Jones to Adjutant General William Steele regarding the possible indictment of the men who killed Dick Dublin when he evaded arrest; and a letter from Lt. N.O. Reynolds protesting accusations that Company E is making enemies in the area.]
2. Correspondence, April 16-30, 1878
[Records include correspondence from officers of the Frontier Battalion and Maj. John B. Jones regarding supplies, discharges, and financial issues; a special order from Maj. Jones assigning Lt. Junius Peak to command Company B; a letter praising Capt. D.W. Roberts and Company D from the citizens of Uvalde County; a letter detailing Indian depredations near Fort Davis; a letter to Maj. Jones regarding a press release about the events in San Elizario; and a letter from Maj. Jones regarding the hunt for Sam Bass and the Omaha train robbers.]
3. Correspondence, May 1-15, 1878
[Records include correspondence from officers of the Frontier Battalion and Maj. John B. Jones regarding supplies, discharges and transfers, and financial issues; letters regarding warrants for those responsible for the deaths in San Elizario; letters from Capt. D.W. Roberts of Company D reporting Indian activity in the area; a telegram from Adjutant General William Steele to Maj. Jones regarding a proposition to sell out Sam Bass and his gang; and a letter from Maj. Jones to Lt. G.W. Arrington of Company C regarding a possible contact in the Sam Bass case.]
4. Correspondence, May 16-31, 1878
[Records include correspondence from officers of the Frontier Battalion and Maj. John B. Jones regarding supplies, reorganization and discharges, and financial issues; a letter to Maj. Jones concerning the political climate in San Elizario; a letter from Adjutant General William Steele to Maj. Jones requesting he look over a statement to be sent to congress regarding the El Paso commission; a letter from the citizens of Throckmorton requesting a ranger presence in the area; a letter from Lt. G.W. Arrington of Company C to Maj. Jones concerning the questioning of a man who corresponded with Sam Bass; a letter reporting lawlessness in Bell County; a letter from Maj. Jones recommending the promotion of Lt. Junius Peak to captain of Company B; and a letter asking that rangers be sent to San Saba to protect a prisoner from a mob.]
5. Correspondence, June 1-15, 1878
[Records include correspondence from officers of the Frontier Battalion and Maj. John B. Jones regarding supplies, discharges, and financial issues; a letter from the mayor of Belton to Governor Richard B. Hubbard concerning troubles in his city and Bell County; letters regarding the finances of Capt. Jesse L. Hall and the Special State Troops; a letter to Maj. Jones requesting information about the Frontier Battalion so as to better compose a letter of support to the legislature; and a petition from the citizens of San Saba requesting that a detachment be stationed there.]
6. Correspondence, June 16-30, 1878
[Records include correspondence from officers of the Frontier Battalion and Maj. John B. Jones regarding supplies, financial issues, and Indian sightings; and a letter from Capt. Neal Coldwell of Company A to Adjutant General William Steele requesting information on how to deal with expenses incurred while holding prisoners for identification.]
7. Correspondence, July 1-15, 1878
[Records include correspondence from officers of the Frontier Battalion and Maj. John B. Jones regarding supplies, financial issues, Indian movements, and arrests made.]
8. Correspondence, July 16-31, 1878
[Records include correspondence from officers of the Frontier Battalion and Maj. John B. Jones regarding supplies, financial issues, reports of operations, and arrests made; a letter from Capt. Pat Dolan of Company F detailing the vindictive actions of a judge in the Uvalde County area; telegraphs reporting that suspects matching the description of Sam Bass and his gang have been seen in Round Rock; a telegram from Adjutant General William Steele to Maj. Jones stating that the report of the capture of Bass is thought to be an election trick; a letter from Maj. Jones regarding an imposter making arrests in the Belton area; and a letter from Maj. Jones inquiring about the reward for Bass.]
9. Correspondence, August 1-15, 1878
[Records include correspondence from officers of the Frontier Battalion and Maj. John B. Jones regarding supplies, financial issues, and Indian movements; a general order regarding reorganization of the companies; a petition from citizens of Uvalde County asking that a company be stationed in the area; a letter from Capt. Neal Coldwell of Company A notifying Maj. Jones that he intends to resign by November; a petition signed by officers of Atascosa County to place their deputy sheriff as the commanding officer of a company; a letter from the superintendent of the Texas Express Company stating that their company and another will each donate towards the reward for Sam Bass; and a petition signed by citizens of Coleman City requesting that Lt. G.W. Arrington and Company C be allowed to stay in the area.]
10. Correspondence, August 16-31, 1878
[Records include correspondence from officers of the Frontier Battalion and Maj. John B. Jones regarding financial issues; a letter from Lt. N.O. Reynolds of Company E concerning his altercation with a black teamster and the repercussions; a letter from Lt. Reynolds to Adjutant General William Steele reporting his opinion of the Merwin Hulbert pistol; a bid by D.M. Young to be placed in a command position within the Frontier Battalion, and a withdrawal of his request in a subsequent letter; and a report of operations from Capt. Jesse L. Hall of the Special State Troops.]
11. Correspondence, August 16-31, 1878
[Records include correspondence from officers of the Frontier Battalion and Maj. John B. Jones regarding recruitment and reorganization, financial issues, and supplies; a letter from Capt. D.W. Roberts of Company D asking to be sent a copy of cavalry tactics so that he can distract his men from idle habits and escape the epithet of a mob; a letter from Maj. Jones regarding a reward offered by the governor that is not backed by funds in appropriations until the legislature meets; and a letter from Capt. Neal Coldwell of Company A in disapproval of D.M. Young as his replacement.]
12. Correspondence, September 1878
[Records include correspondence from officers of the Frontier Battalion and Maj. John B. Jones regarding supplies, financial issues, and enlistment; a letter from Lt. J.A. Tays of Company C addressing a complaint made against him; letters from Lt. Tays regarding Indian and Mexican relations in El Paso County; a report to Adjutant General William Steele by Sgt. C.L. Nevill of Company E regarding the performance of the Merwin Hulbert pistol; letters from Adjutant General Steele concerning a bill in the U.S. Senate for greater appropriations for militia groups; and a letter from Capt. Neal Coldwell of Company A regarding his resignation for the purpose of running for sheriff.]
13. Correspondence, October 1-15, 1878
[Records include correspondence from officers of the Frontier Battalion and Maj. John B. Jones regarding supplies, financial issues, and Indian movements; a letter from Maj. Jones to Lt. J.A. Tays of Company C asking that he pursue the Indians of the area to the Fort Stanton Reservation and submit a detailed account so that Maj. Jones may prove depredations to the U.S. authorities; a letter from Sgt. C.D. Walsh of Company A to Adjutant General William Steele explaining his actions which were criticized in the Galveston News; general orders regarding winter preparations; and a telegram from Lt. N.O. Reynolds of Company E reporting that he arrived safe with John Wesley Hardin in Huntsville.]
14. Correspondence, October 16-31, 1878
[Records include correspondence from officers of the Frontier Battalion and Maj. John B. Jones regarding supplies, financial issues, leave, and Indian movements; letters regarding charges that Lt. J.A. Tays used his detachment of Company C to drive his own cattle; a letter from Lt. Tays concerning escaped prisoners and lax sheriff oversight in Ysleta, a letter attempting to settle the affairs of a ranger who died due to a self-inflicted gunshot wound received while in service; and a report from Capt. Jesse L. Hall of the Special State Troops regarding arrests made and recovered property.]
15. Correspondence, November 1-15, 1878
[Records include correspondence from officers of the Frontier Battalion and Maj. John B. Jones regarding supplies, reports of operations, and financial issues; a letter from Capt. D.W. Roberts of Company D describing possible corruption in the Kimble County sheriff election; a statement issued by Adjutant General William Steele offering a ten dollar reward for information on any raids; an order from Lt. G.W. Arrington of Company C disciplining three of his men for disorderly conduct; and a petition from the citizens of Taylor County requesting a squad of rangers to be sent to the area to maintain peace.]
16. Correspondence, November 16-30, 1878
[Records include correspondence from officers of the Frontier Battalion and Maj. John B. Jones regarding supplies, financial issues, and discharges; the resignation of Lt. J.A. Tays, commanding officer of a detachment of Company C; a letter of grievances against the collector of customs for El Paso County signed by citizens; a letter from a judge in Laredo reporting the misconduct of members of Company A; and a bond for fifty Springfield Carbine rifles.]
17. Correspondence, December 1-15, 1878
[Records include correspondence from officers of the Frontier Battalion and Maj. John B. Jones regarding supplies and financial issues; a telegram from Lt. G.W. Arrington regarding a private from Company C who was arrested for assault and discharged; and a general order concerning legislative appropriations and reorganization.]
18. Correspondence, December 1-15, 1878
[Records include correspondence from officers of the Frontier Battalion and Maj. John B. Jones regarding discharges, supplies, and financial issues; statements regarding a disagreement between Lt. G.W. Arrington and a member of Company C regarding a withdrawal of pay; a letter from Lt. J.B. Armstrong of the Special State Troops concerning a stagecoach robbery in Marion; and a letter from John C. Sparks wishing to be re-enrolled in the Frontier Battalion as a commander if possible.]
19. Correspondence, December 16-31, 1878
[Records include correspondence from officers of the Frontier Battalion and Maj. John B. Jones regarding supplies and financial issues; a petition signed by members of the detachment of Company C in El Paso County who want Sgt. M. Ludwick to be promoted to commander of the detachment; a petition of residents of west Texas wishing to see D.M. Young given command of a company; and a letter from Maj. Jones to Adjutant General William Steele regarding the murder of four children herding sheep in Kerr County.]
20. Correspondence, December 16-31, 1878
[Records include correspondence from officers of the Frontier Battalion and Maj. John B. Jones regarding supplies, reports of operations, and financial issues; a report by Maj. Jones to Adjutant General William Steele regarding the Dowdy massacre; a letter from the sheriff of Menard County requesting a supply of counterfeit money to use in a plan to catch mail robbers; an itemized list showing all public property purchased from frontier protection funds from September of 1877 to December of 1878; a letter to Maj. Jones from a friend discussing his retirement from a leadership role in the Frontier Battalion; and a letter from Maj. Jones to Lt. G.W. Arrington of Company C requesting detailed information about any Indian sighting so that he may pass the information to Congress.]
Box Folder
401-398 1. Correspondence, January 1-15, 1879
[Records include correspondence from officers of the Frontier Battalion and Maj. John B. Jones regarding supplies, financial issues, and discharges and appointments; a letter from Sgt. M. Ludwick of the detachment of Company C in Ysleta concerning a large group of Mexicans headed into the U.S. who were involved in the conflict in San Elizario; a statement of thefts and robberies perpetrated by John and Bill Hardin, cousins of John Wesley Hardin; letters regarding the arrest of one of the Hardin brothers and an associate named Pickens; a letter from Capt. Junius Peak of Company B concerning the role of major of the Frontier Battalion being done away with; a signed oath of service from the men of Company E; and a letter from Capt. Nicholas Nolan of the 10th U.S. Cavalry reporting on the large groups of Indians that are absent from their agencies.]
2. Correspondence, January 16-31, 1879
[Records include correspondence from officers of the Frontier Battalion and Maj. John B. Jones regarding arrests and financial issues; a resolution from the citizens of Fredericksburg in support of the Frontier Battalion; a statement from Adjutant General William Steele regarding the finances of the Frontier Battalion; a report from 2nd Lt. A.M. Patch of the 4th U.S. Cavalry regarding large bands of Indians in the Panhandle area, who have left their agencies; a report from Capt. John Wilcox of the 4th U.S. Cavalry stating that the Indians have been supplied with food in an effort to get them to return to their agencies; and a report from Lt. G.W. Arrington of Company C concerning the killing of one of the Indians belonging to a party supervised by the cavalry.]
3. Correspondence, January 16-31, 1879
[Records include correspondence from officers of the Frontier Battalion and Maj. John B. Jones regarding supplies, discharges and promotions, and financial issues; a letter from Sgt. M. Ludwick of the detachment of Company C in Ysleta reporting that he has warrants for more than one hundred men who participated in the conflict in San Elizario, but the sheriff refuses to serve them; letters to a state senator from Maj. Jones regarding his experience as acting quartermaster of the Frontier Battalion; and a letter and a transcription of an inquest regarding the shooting in self defense of Roman Gonzales.]
4. Correspondence, February 1-15, 1879
[Records include correspondence from officers of the Frontier Battalion and Adjutant General John B. Jones regarding discharges and financial issues; a request from citizens of San Elizario for a detachment of seventy-five rangers to be sent to deal with desperadoes; a letter from Lt. N.O. Reynolds of Company E requesting a discharge due to medical concerns, and his resignation; a petition signed by citizens of Fort Concho addressed to the Senate and House of Representatives requesting the continued service of the Frontier Battalion; and a list of resolutions from the citizens of Menard County detailing to the legislature the necessity of the Frontier Battalion.]
5. Correspondence, February 16-28, 1879
[Records include correspondence from officers of the Frontier Battalion and Adjutant General John B. Jones regarding supplies and financial issues; a memorial from the County Commissioners Court and officers of Mason County, and one from citizens of Kimble County, stating the necessity of the Frontier Battalion in frontier defense; a report from Capt. S.H. Lincoln of the 10th U.S. Infantry regarding Indians in the Texas Panhandle who refuse to return to their reservations without food; and a petition signed by members of Company E to promote Sgt. C.L. Neville to commander of the company.]
6. Correspondence, March 1879
[Records include correspondence from officers of the Frontier Battalion and Adjutant General John B. Jones regarding supplies, financial issues, arrests, and discharges; a letter from a private in Company A under Lt. G.B. Broadwater protesting his discharge; a special order concerning a reduction of the Frontier Battalion; a letter containing a legal opinion on the legitimacy of Capt. Jesse L. Hall's Special State Troops continuing to function beyond their six month appropriation; and a copy of resolutions put forward by a committee of members of Company E to express the sentiments of the company regarding the resignation of Lt. N.O. Reynolds.]
7. Correspondence, April 1879
[Records include correspondence from officers of the Frontier Battalion and Adjutant General John B. Jones regarding supplies, financial issues, reports of operations, and court appearances; a report in which Lt. G.W. Arrington of Company C complains that the limited number of men in his company prevents his protection of exposed sections of the frontier; and a special order concerning a reduction in appropriations for frontier defense passed by the legislature resulting in a reduction of Company E.]
8. Correspondence, May 1879
[Records include correspondence from officers of the Frontier Battalion and Adjutant General John B. Jones regarding supplies and financial issues; legal documents regarding pensions from the State of Texas; and an itemized account of a trip to Llano County including fares and meals.]
9. Correspondence, June 1879
[Records include correspondence from officers of the Frontier Battalion and Adjutant General John B. Jones regarding supplies, arrests, and financial issues; a letter from Capt. D.W. Roberts of Company D regarding Indian depredations and proposing an increase of seventy-five men to scatter a group he believes is gathering east of Pecos; letters concerning the killing of a woman and her two children by Indians near Camp Wood; a letter from a resident of Camp Wood stating that he believes people will leave the area if they do not have protection due to several instances of Indian depredations in the area; a transcribed letter from Capt. G.W. Arrington of Company C regarding a statement that the rangers would be arrested by the U.S. troops for interfering with the Indians, and a rebuttal from the county commissioner who made the statement that ranger presence was intended to provoke an Indian war; letters from Capt. Arrington describing his concerns and conflict with Lt. Col. John Wynn Davidson regarding the Indians in the area; and a letter from Capt. Neal Coldwell regarding the pursuit of King Fisher.]
10. Correspondence, July 1879
[Records include correspondence from officers of the Frontier Battalion and Adjutant General John B. Jones regarding supplies, arrests, and financial issues; a general order putting the disciplining of the men in the hands of the company commanders; a letter from Sgt. T.L. Oglesby of Company A complaining of limitations due to reduced numbers and isolation; a special order concerning a reduction of pay and authorization to discharge men who object; a letter to Governor Oran Milo Roberts signed by the commissioners of Wheeler County stating that they wish Capt. G.W. Arrington and Company C to leave the area as they are there to kill Indians which will begin a war; and letters regarding the arrest of mail robbers.]
11. Correspondence, August 1879
[Records include correspondence from officers of the Frontier Battalion and Adjutant General John B. Jones regarding supplies and financial issues; an estimate of rations needed to supply Company B; a letter from an attorney in Wheeler County defending the actions of Capt. Nick Nolan of the 10th U.S. Cavalry against accusations from Capt. Junius Peak of Company B; a letter from Capt. D.W. Roberts of Company D reporting a possible connection between the Dublin family and the mail robbers; letters from Capt. Roberts regarding the capture of Dell Dublin; and a report of operations from Capt. Jesse L. Hall of the Special Force including a statement that King Fisher cannot be convicted in Eagle Pass.]
12. Correspondence, September 1879
[Records include correspondence from officers of the Frontier Battalion and Adjutant General John B. Jones regarding supplies, reports of operations, and financial issues; a special order restricting card playing in Company E; letters from Capt. Junius Peak of Company B regarding Capt. Nicholas Nolan of the 10th U.S. Cavalry and Indian relations; a letter from Lt. T.L. Oglesby reporting that King Fisher escaped his guard on the way to Laredo; and reports of operations of Capt. Jesse L. Hall of the Special Force State Troops.]
13. Correspondence, October 1-15, 1879
[Records include correspondence from officers of the Frontier Battalion and Adjutant General John B. Jones regarding supplies, financial issues, reports of operations, and arrests; and a telegram regarding a petition for ranger presence along the Rio Grande due to the withdrawal of U.S. troops.]
14. Correspondence, October 16-31, 1879
[Records include correspondence from officers of the Frontier Battalion and Adjutant General John B. Jones regarding supplies, financial issues, and reports of operations; letters from Capt. D.W. Roberts of Company D regarding the search of the houses of the suspected mail robbers, including the Dublins, and the recovery of gold buttons matching a description of stolen property; and a request for aid in Potter County.]
15. Correspondence, November 1879
[Records include correspondence from officers of the Frontier Battalion and Adjutant General John B. Jones regarding supplies, financial issues, arrests and trials, and reports of operations; a commendation of the work of Capt. T.L. Oglesby from the Grand Jury of Maverick County; and a report of operations from Capt. Jesse L. Hall of the Special Force State Troops.]
16. Correspondence, December 1879
[Records include correspondence from officers of the Frontier Battalion and Adjutant General John B. Jones regarding supplies, financial issues, and arrests made; a list of arrests made by Company E including the Pegleg stage robbers Roll Dublin and Ruben Boyce; an itemized list of property of Company D; a list of horses stolen from May to December 1879; a report by Lt. G.W. Baylor of Company C regarding the pursuit of Victorio and his band of Apaches; and a letter from a man hoping to use the information he learned while incarcerated to shorten his sentence.]
17. Correspondence, January 1-15, 1880
[Records include correspondence from officers of the Frontier Battalion and Adjutant General John B. Jones regarding supplies, financial issues, arrests made, and trial information, and a letter from a man in Baylor County who is putting together a militia due to lack of rangers in the area.]
18. Correspondence, January 1-15, 1880
[Records include correspondence from officers of the Frontier Battalion and Adjutant General John B. Jones regarding supplies, financial issues, and arrests made; a telegram from the sheriff of Jack County requesting the assistance of Company C in collecting taxes from the unorganized counties who refuse to pay; the election results for officers of the Brenham Greys; a letter concerning the organization of the Jones Rifles; a report of operations from Capt. Jesse L. Hall of the Special Force State Troops; and a letter from Lt. G.W. Baylor of Company C regarding discharges and the pursuit of Victorio.]
19. Correspondence, January 16-31, 1880
[Records include correspondence from officers of the Frontier Battalion and Adjutant General John B. Jones regarding supplies and financial issues; letters regarding the return or payment of $3,000 worth of arms from the now defunct Alamo Rifles; a telegram from the commanding officer of Roberts Rifles asking if they can select their own uniforms; letters regarding the formation of several local militia groups; a letter from Lt. G.W. Baylor of Company C predicting a coming Indian war and requesting that the militia in Ysleta and San Elizario be given arms if possible; a letter from an attorney in Ysleta warning that the militia of the area is composed of the same men who participated in the Salt War two years prior and should not be given arms; and a letter from the sheriff of Llano reporting the killing of three hundred sheep and the wounding of two hundred more as a warning to local ranchers, the Ramsey brothers, to leave the area.]
Box Folder
401-399 1. Correspondence, February 1-15, 1880
[Records include correspondence from officers of the Frontier Battalion and Adjutant General John B. Jones regarding supplies and financial issues; a letter regarding the formation of the Johnson County Guards; a letter from Capt. G.W. Arrington of Company C to Capt. Junius Peak of Company B attempting to rectify a misunderstanding that he did not wish to cooperate between companies; and witness testimonies regarding a threat made against Capt. Arrington by a sergeant, and Capt. Arrington's response.]
2. Correspondence, February 1-15, 1880
[Records include correspondence from officers of the Frontier Battalion and Adjutant General John B. Jones regarding financial issues and supplies; a letter from the captain of the Houston Light Guard requesting to know if their rivals are disbanding and joining a different militia; a bond for rifles; a letter relating to the conflict between Sgt. Ed Hageman and Capt. G.W. Arrington of Company C; a report from Capt. Arrington concerning the pursuit of Indians near the New Mexico border; and a letter from Lt. Col. John Porter Hatch of the 4th U.S. Cavalry requesting information on a lake Capt. Arrington discovered.]
3. Correspondence, February 16, 1880-February 29, 1880
[Records include correspondence from officers of the Frontier Battalion and Adjutant General John B. Jones regarding supplies, financial issues, and discharges; a special order limiting cursing in the hearing of women and enacting an eight o' clock curfew; a letter from Lt. Col. John Porter Hatch of the 4th U.S. Cavalry stating that he believes the lake discovered by Capt. G.W. Arrington of Company C is the lake known as Lost Lake and has been a refuge for raiding Indians; and a letter from A.M. Gregory of the Salter Rifles requesting information on other colored companies in the militia so that they can form a colored regiment.]
4. Correspondence, March 1-15, 1880
[Records include correspondence from officers of the Frontier Battalion and Adjutant General John B. Jones regarding supplies, financial issues, and discharges; a letter from Ira Long accepting a position as captain of Company B provided he can choose his sergeant; the resignation of Capt. Junius Peak from Company B; a list of horses and mules stolen by Indians since December 1879 submitted by Capt. G.W. Arrington of Company C; a letter from a man requesting the particulars of the process of forming a colored military company; a notice that a petition is being circulated to call a convention of colored troops to elect field officers and form a regiment; a letter relating to the continued troubles of the Ramsey brothers in Llano after threats were made against them and their sheep were slaughtered; and a list of names of the Shackleford County mob.]
5. Correspondence, March 16-31, 1880
[Records include correspondence from officers of the Frontier Battalion and Adjutant General John B. Jones regarding supplies and financial issues; a letter from an attorney requesting aid in Atascosa County to stop a group of horse thieves before the townspeople take matters into their own hands; and accounts of an arrest that went wrong resulting in a shoot out that the arresting officer survived due to a book in his jacket pocket.]
6. Correspondence, March 16-31, 1880
[Records include correspondence from officers of the Frontier Battalion and Adjutant General John B. Jones regarding supplies and financial issues; a letter from a surveyor requesting an escort through Apache land to appraise common school land for the state; a letter from an attorney in Groesbeck promising a guilty verdict if Mitch Cotton, a black man and a former special policeman of the Texas State Police, could be captured due to his shooting of a disorderly white man in 1871; a letter from a witness called to trial who requests protection; a letter from H.B. Philpot of Company E addressing his medical bills and care at the hands of a questionable physician; and a letter from Lt. G.W. Baylor of Company C regarding Federal Troops amassing at Fort Bayard for a campaign against Victorio.]
7. Correspondence, April 1-15, 1880
[Records include correspondence from officers of the Frontier Battalion and Adjutant General John B. Jones regarding supplies, financial issues, arrests, and discharges; documents related to the election of officers of various state militia groups; a detailed account, written by Lt. T.L. Oglesby of the Special Force State Troops, reporting the events of an arrest that resulted in a shootout and two deaths; and a letter from Lt. C.L. Nevill of Company E reporting that most of the sheep killers, who threatened the Ramsey brothers in Llano, have been caught.]
8. Correspondence, April 16-30, 1880
[Records include correspondence from officers of the Frontier Battalion and Adjutant General John B. Jones regarding supplies and financial issues; a letter from a father looking for news of his son who joined the state militia in 1872 or 1873; letters concerning the Jones Rifles militia group; a letter commending E.D. Rossean for his work in the sheep killer case in Llano despite a lack of convictions; a letter from Capt. G.W. Arrington of Company C in Baylor County regarding a rise in disorder due to the presence of cowboys moving through the area and the opening of a saloon; and a letter from Sgt. W.C. Bradley regarding rumors that trouble is expected due to overcrowding of cattle and competing ranchers.]
9. Correspondence, May 1-15, 1880
[Records include correspondence from officers of the Frontier Battalion and Adjutant General John B. Jones regarding supplies and financial issues; letters regarding the pursuit of Reuben Boyce, one of the Pegleg stage robbers; letters regarding nominations for the 2nd and 3rd regiment of the Volunteer Guards of the State of Texas; and a letter from Capt. G.W. Arrington of Company C reporting that the roundup in Seymour is finished but trouble is still expected between the cowboys and the constable.]
10. Correspondence, May 1-15, 1880
[Records include correspondence from officers of the Frontier Battalion and Adjutant General John B. Jones regarding supplies and financial issues, and a report from Capt. D.W. Roberts of Company D regarding his pursuit of Reuben Boyce.]
11. Correspondence, May 16-31, 1880
[Records include correspondence from officers of the Frontier Battalion and Adjutant General John B. Jones regarding supplies and financial issues; letters concerning various volunteer and militia groups; a letter from Capt. D.W. Roberts of Company D concerning the continued pursuit of Reuben Boyce and the escape and recapture of a prisoner who ran into the trap he had told the rangers to set up for Boyce; a letter from the sheriff of Hidalgo County notifying Governor Oran M. Roberts of the murder of a man named Bishop and the rape of his servant, claiming it to be the third murder carried out by men crossing into the U.S. from Mexico; the resignation of Capt. Jesse L. Hall of the Special Force; and a telegram from citizens of El Paso who believe the Jesse Evans gang will be in their area shortly.]
12. Correspondence, May 16-31, 1880
[Records include correspondence from officers of the Frontier Battalion and Adjutant General John B. Jones regarding supplies and financial issues; correspondence from different militia groups regarding formation and supplies, and a letter detailing troubles in Fort Davis.]
13. Correspondence, June 1-15, 1880
[Records include correspondence from officers of the Frontier Battalion and Adjutant General John B. Jones regarding supplies and financial issues, and a list of all outrages and Indian raids in Presidio County from June 1879 to June 1880.]
14. Correspondence, June 1-15, 1880
[Records include correspondence from officers of the Frontier Battalion and Adjutant General John B. Jones regarding supplies and financial issues; an itemized list of state property received from Capt. Jesse L. Hall; letters from Capt. T.L. Oglesby and Lt. S.A. McMurray of the Special Force accepting their promotions; and a report of the troubles in the Fort Davis area.]
15. Correspondence, June 16-30, 1880
[Records include correspondence from officers of the Frontier Battalion and Adjutant General John B. Jones regarding supplies, financial issues, and Indian sightings; correspondence from different militia groups regarding formation and supplies; a letter regarding U.S. laws concerning the penalty for cutting telegraph wires and requesting ranger aid in their enforcement; a report by Sgt. W.L. Rudd detailing his efforts to arrest the Bishop murderers; and a letter regarding an injury obtained by Capt. T.L. Oglesby of the Special Force while in pursuit.]
16. Correspondence, July 1-15, 1880
[Records include correspondence from officers of the Frontier Battalion and Adjutant General John B. Jones regarding supplies and financial issues; the resignation of Capt. D.W. Roberts from Company D; correspondence from different militia groups regarding formation and supplies; and a letter from the sheriff of Shackleford County explaining that he does not think it wise to bring John Henry Selman to trial because conviction is unsure but mob violence seems likely.]
17. Correspondence, July 1-15, 1880
[Records include correspondence from officers of the Frontier Battalion and Adjutant General John B. Jones regarding supplies and financial issues; a letter from Sgt. L.B. Caruthers of Company E requesting instructions regarding orders from a Shackleford County judge in the case of John Henry Selman; a telegram from the sheriff of Shackleford County insisting that Selman cannot be brought there as a mob will hang him and charges cannot be sustained; reports of the shoot out and capture of Jesse Evans and his compatriots; and a letter from Capt. D.W. Roberts of Company D complaining of a sergeant from a different company claiming the credit for the Evans capture.]
18. Correspondence, July 16-31, 1880
[Records include correspondence from officers of the Frontier Battalion and Adjutant General John B. Jones regarding supplies, financial issues, discharges, and arrests made, and a resignation from the lieutenant of the Coke Rifles who gives his reasons for wishing to leave including the increasing debt of his men.]
19. Correspondence, August 1-15, 1880
[Records include correspondence from officers of the Frontier Battalion and Adjutant General John B. Jones regarding supplies and financial issues; a report from Capt. Neal Coldwell regarding the lack of discipline of Lt. G.W. Baylor's detachment of Company E and the murder of a stagecoach driver and passenger; correspondence from different militia groups regarding bonds and elections; copies of indictments; a report from Capt. D.W. Roberts of Company D regarding the continued search for Reuben Boyce, an associate of the Dublin brothers; and a telegram from Capt. Coldwell in Fort Davis reporting that Victorio was seen in the area and the U.S. Calvary is in pursuit.]
20. Correspondence, August 16-31, 1880
[Records include correspondence from officers of the Frontier Battalion and Adjutant General John B. Jones regarding supplies, financial issues, and recruitment; a report from Capt. T.L. Oglesby of the Special Force concerning "alleged outrages and maltreatment of Mexican citizens of Bee County," which finds no injustices; and correspondence from different militia groups regarding arms and elections.]
21. Correspondence, August 16-31, 1880
[Records include correspondence from officers of the Frontier Battalion and Adjutant General John B. Jones regarding supplies and financial issues; a letter from the sheriff of Limestone County forwarding the indictment against Mitch Cotton and offering to give a description if necessary; letters regarding wanted fugitives; and a report from Lt. G.W. Baylor of Company C regarding the pursuit of Victorio out of Texas.]
Box Folder
401-400 1. Correspondence, September 1-15, 1880
[Records include correspondence from officers of the Frontier Battalion and Adjutant General John B. Jones regarding recruitment and discharges, supplies, and financial issues; correspondence from various militia groups regarding organization and elections; a letter from a Judge in Beeville addressing "alleged maltreatment of citizens of Mexico by local authorities," an allegation that arose after the arrest of several people related to the disappearance of a local farmer; a letter from Capt. D.W. Roberts of Company D about the continued pursuit of Reuben Boyce; a letter from Lt. C.L. Nevill of Company E reporting that a party headed by Bill Autrim, alias Kid, is on their way to free Jesse Evans; and a special order promoting G.W. Baylor to captain of Company A.]
2. Correspondence, September 16-30, 1880
[Records include correspondence from officers of the Frontier Battalion and Adjutant General John B. Jones regarding supplies and financial issues; correspondence from various militia groups regarding organization and elections; a letter from a man in Castroville seeking information about a political opponent and his time in the Frontier Battalion; a letter regarding a mistake in a survey of a piece of reserve land in the Panhandle which may change ownership of the land; and a letter from Capt. D.W. Roberts of Company D concerning his run for sheriff in Menard County.]
3. Correspondence, October 1-15, 1880
[Records include correspondence from officers of the Frontier Battalion and Adjutant General John B. Jones regarding supplies, arrests, and financial issues; and documents related to the operations of various militia and volunteer guards.]
4. Correspondence, October 16-31, 1880
[Records include correspondence from officers of the Frontier Battalion and Adjutant General John B. Jones regarding transfers and discharges, supplies, financial issues, and criminal cases; a letter requesting information on a petition to place Grimes County under martial law during the term of Governor Edmund J. Davis; a letter from Lt. C.L. Nevill of Company E regarding the conviction of Jesse Evans and the legality of the confiscation of firearms from prisoners; a letter from Sgt. James B. Gillett of Company A to Capt. Neal Coldwell regarding murderers who sought safety across the Mexican border; and a letter from Sgt. Gillett requesting permission to marry.]
5. Correspondence, November 1-15, 1880
[Records include correspondence from officers of the Frontier Battalion and Adjutant General John B. Jones regarding supplies, financial issues, and discharges, and letters concerning the leadership of two militia groups, the Bryan Rifles and the Grant Rifles.]
6. Correspondence, November 16-30, 1880
[Records include correspondence from officers of the Frontier Battalion and Adjutant General John B. Jones regarding supplies, financial issues, discharges, and arrests made, and the resignation of Capt. Ira Long from Company B.]
7. Correspondence, December 1-15, 1880
[Records include correspondence from officers of the Frontier Battalion and Adjutant General John B. Jones regarding supplies, discharges, and financial issues; a letter asking about the size of the adjutant general's office and what other office it conducts the most business with for the purpose of planning the new state capitol; correspondence regarding various militia groups; a letter from Sgt. James Gillett of Company A thanking Adjutant General Jones for permission to marry; and a monthly return from Lt. C.L. Nevill of Company E in which he writes that he does not trust the rumors of Victorio's death as the Indians of the area are just as active as ever.]
8. Correspondence, December 16-31, 1880
[Records include correspondence from officers of the Frontier Battalion and Adjutant General John B. Jones regarding supplies, discharges, and financial issues, and a memorial addressed to Governor Oran M. Roberts from the people of El Paso requesting ranger aid.]
9. Correspondence, January 1881
[Records include correspondence from officers of the Frontier Battalion and Adjutant General John B. Jones regarding supplies, arrests made, and financial issues; correspondence from various militia groups concerning elections of officers and a bill in the legislature regarding the militia; a letter from a man requesting the names of soldiers lost in the Texas War of Independence; a petition from the citizens of Comanche County requesting that the men who signed a bond for firearms be released as the remaining weapons were lost in defense of the state; a letter from Capt. J.D. Jackson of the Gregory Rifles asking if transportation to Washington will be covered as he wishes to ride in a parade related to the election of President James A. Garfield; and a letter from Capt. D.W. Roberts of Company D regarding the Sutton Taylor feud and the ongoing hunt for Bill Taylor.]
10. Correspondence, February 1-15, 1881
[Records include correspondence from officers of the Frontier Battalion and Adjutant General John B. Jones regarding supplies and financial issues; a memorial signed by members of the Texas Volunteer Guard in support of militias; and correspondence with various militia groups.]
11. Correspondence, February 1-15, 1881
[Records include correspondence from officers of the Frontier Battalion and Adjutant General John B. Jones regarding supplies, semi-monthly reports, and financial issues; a report from Lt. C.L. Nevill of Company E regarding a fight with Indians near Quitman; and a report on the same Indian fight from Capt. G.W. Baylor of Company A.]
12. Correspondence, February 16-28, 1881
[Records include correspondence from officers of the Frontier Battalion and Adjutant General John B. Jones regarding supplies and financial issues; application letters to join the Frontier Battalion; and correspondence related to various militia groups.]
13. Correspondence, March 1-15, 1881
[Records include correspondence from officers of the Frontier Battalion and Adjutant General John B. Jones regarding supplies, discharges, financial issues, and Indian sightings; a letter from Capt. D.W. Roberts of Company D concerning the continued pursuit of Reuben Boyce; and a letter offering a reward for Jake Napier with a picture enclosed.]
14. Correspondence, March 16-31, 1881
[Records include correspondence from officers of the Frontier Battalion and Adjutant General John B. Jones regarding supplies and financial issues; a letter from Capt. Thomas Scurry of the Houston Light Guard requesting more ammunition in order for his men to take part in a shooting contest amongst militia men at the upcoming Volksfest; a letter requesting the use of muskets for a military company organized of St. Mary's University students; and correspondence with militia groups regarding elections and appropriations.]
15. Correspondence, April 1-15, 1881
[Records include correspondence from officers of the Frontier Battalion and Capt. Neal Coldwell regarding supplies, financial issues, and discharges; a petition from the citizens of Fort Davis requesting a small force of rangers to be stationed in the area for protection; letters from Lt. C.L. Nevill of Company E regarding a misunderstanding of a general order to reduce the size of his company that caused him to discharge all of his men; and a letter from Capt. G.W. Baylor of Company A concerning the appropriation for frontier defense to be voted on by the legislature.]
16. Correspondence, April 16-30, 1881
[Records include correspondence from officers of the Frontier Battalion and Capt. Neal Coldwell regarding supplies, financial issues, and monthly returns; a letter from Capt. T.L. Oglesby of Company F regarding horses stolen from Austin and the surrounding area; and a letter from Capt. G.W. Arrington of Company C regarding cattle stolen by a band of thieves headed by Billy the Kid.]
17. Correspondence, May 1-15, 1881
[Records include correspondence from officers of the Frontier Battalion and Adjutant General John B. Jones regarding supplies and financial issues; correspondence from various militia groups regarding the election of officers and the provision of firearms; a letter from L.B. Caruthers, formerly of Company E, urging an increase in the number of men in the company; a letter from Sgt. J.B. Gillett of Company A reporting that he is still wanted in Mexico; and a letter from Capt. G.W. Baylor of Company A concerning the enlistment of married men.]
18. Correspondence, May 16-31, 1881
[Records include correspondence from officers of the Frontier Battalion and Adjutant General John B. Jones regarding supplies, discharges, and financial issues; a letter regarding a gathering of colored militia groups and a request for ten thousand blank rounds to be used in a mock fight during a celebration of Emancipation Day; a letter from Capt. D.W. Roberts of Company D explaining the circumstances that led to the killing of rancher W.P. Patterson in Colorado City and denying the existence of a feud between rangers and cowboys; a letter from Lt. C.L. Nevill of Company E concerning the conflict between Sgt. J.B. Gillett and Mexican authorities after he crossed the border without permission to retrieve a fugitive; and a letter from Sgt. Gillett commenting on his wanted status.]
19. Correspondence, June 1881
[Records include correspondence from officers of the Frontier Battalion and Adjutant General John B. Jones regarding supplies, financial issues, discharges, and Indian sightings; correspondence with various militia groups concerning organization and elections of officers; a letter from Capt. D.W. Roberts of Company D regarding the feelings of the community of Colorado City after the killing of W.P. Patterson, a local rancher; a general order warning the men of the Frontier Battalion not to transcend their authority, specifically restricting border crossings to retrieve fugitives; a letter from Capt. Neal Coldwell reporting on the condition of Company B and the reported misconduct of Capt. Bryan Marsh; and a letter from Lt. C.L. Nevill of Company E regarding a report that Billy the Kid was seen on the Pecos River.]
20. Correspondence, July 1881
[Records include correspondence from officers of the Frontier Battalion and Adjutant General John B. Jones regarding financial issues; two petitions from citizens of counties in the panhandle requesting protection from the nearby Indian reservation and outlaws; and a letter from Lt. C.L. Nevill of Company E concerning his follow up to reports that Billy the Kid was depredating along the Pecos River.]
21. Correspondence, August 1-15, 1881
[Records include correspondence from officers of the Frontier Battalion and Adjutant General W.H. King regarding supplies, reports of operations, and financial issues; a letter regarding the settling of the late John B. Jones' indebtedness to the state; a copy of a bond for $800 for firearms for the Coke Guards, a militia group in Coryell County; and correspondence from various militia groups.]
22. Correspondence, August 16-31, 1881
[Records include correspondence from officers of the Frontier Battalion and Adjutant General W.H. King regarding supplies and financial issues; a letter from the governor of the Territory of New Mexico requesting information about the Texas systems of militia and rangers as he intends to start his own Frontier Battalion; a letter from an attorney in Orange County regarding an attempted shooting by two black men that resulted in mob violence and the hanging of the shooters and one other black man; a letter from the captain of the Orange Rifles, a militia group in Orange County, reporting their involvement in the arrests and guarding of prisoners; a telegram from the captain of the Orange Rifles reporting that they have been ordered to assist in suppressing a riot; and a telegram from the sheriff of Griffin requesting information on the holding of John Selman.]
Box Folder
401-401 1. Correspondence, September 1-15, 1881
[Records include correspondence from officers of the Frontier Battalion and Adjutant General W.H. King regarding supplies and financial issues; the resignation of Capt. D.W. Roberts from Company D; a letter from Capt. S.A. McMurray of Company B regarding disagreements between the Texas & Pacific Railway and saloon keepers establishing themselves along the line; and letters from Capt. C.L. Nevill of Company E concerning a search for Indians on foot who killed a shepherd and a request for firearms with a longer range.]
2. Correspondence, September 1-15, 1881
[Records include correspondence from officers of the Frontier Battalion and Adjutant General W.H. King regarding supplies and financial issues; a letter from an Orange County attorney regarding discrepancies in his timeline of the riot which occurred there in August; a letter from a widow of a soldier who fell during the Texas Revolution at the Dawson Massacre, regarding a land certificate which is owed to her; a letter from an attorney of the Texas & Pacific Railway pressing their case for the removal of whiskey sellers that follow their camp; and letters requesting ranger presence in Oldham County.]
3. Correspondence, September 16-30, 1881
[Records include correspondence from officers of the Frontier Battalion and Adjutant General W.H. King regarding discharges and transfers, supplies, monthly returns, and financial issues; a general order stating that diseases contracted outside of the line of duty and of a "private nature" will be treated at personal expense; and a letter from a representative of the Texas & Pacific Railway requesting a force of rangers for protection from cowboy violence and promising free passage in return.]
4. Correspondence, September 16-30, 1881
[Records include correspondence from officers of the Frontier Battalion and Adjutant General W.H. King regarding supplies and financial issues; a small volume containing reports of scouts of Company E from August 31 to September 1, 1880; a letter from an attorney writing on behalf of a man opening a high school in Jefferson, requesting cadet muskets or small arms; a letter requesting arms for a military department attached to a large school in Chico; correspondence with various militia groups regarding firearms and elections; and a letter from Capt. D.W. Roberts of Company D to Capt. Neal Coldwell regarding his plans once he leaves the service and endorsing Sgt. L.P. Sieker as his replacement.]
5. Correspondence, October 1-15, 1881
[Records include correspondence from officers of the Frontier Battalion and Adjutant General W.H. King regarding supplies and financial issues; a letter from Lt. L.P. Sieker acknowledging his promotion to commanding officer of Company D; correspondence with various militia groups regarding bonds for firearms and the election of officers; a message from the Spanish consul regarding reports that the rangers have threatened Juan H. Fernandez; and a general order initiating cost-saving practices due to a rise in supply costs.]
6. Correspondence, October 16-31, 1881
[Records include correspondence from officers of the Frontier Battalion and Adjutant General W.H. King regarding supplies and financial issues; a letter to T.O. Malior concerning his father's failing health and requesting he return at once; a letter from a representative of Texas & Pacific Railway regarding an agreement to station Company B along the railroad line; and correspondence from various militia groups.]
7. Correspondence, November 1881
[Records include correspondence from officers of the Frontier Battalion and Adjutant General W.H. King regarding supplies, discharges, and financial issues; a letter from the adjutant general of California requesting copies of the adjutant general's report from 1860-1880; letters regarding men harassing a shepherd at a ranch near Bluffton and the follow-up on the matter performed by Lt. L.P. Sieker of Company D; a letter from Capt. G.W. Arrington of Company C reporting insubordination among several of his men whom he requests be discharged; and a letter from the sheriff of Medina County complaining that a group of armed men claiming to be an organized militia are operating in the county unnecessarily, and he wishes to verify their credentials.]
8. Correspondence, December 1-15, 1881
[Records include correspondence from officers of the Frontier Battalion and Adjutant General W.H. King regarding supplies and financial issues; correspondence from various militia groups regarding firearms and dissolution; a letter from men in Shreveport, Louisiana, claiming to have information about the whereabouts of Mitch Cotton and requesting information about a reward; and a letter from Capt. C.L. Nevill of Company E regarding the escort of surveyors mapping the Rio Grande.]
9. Correspondence, December 1-15, 1881
[Records include correspondence from officers of the Frontier Battalion and Adjutant General W.H. King regarding supplies and financial issues; a letter from a representative of the Texas-Mexican Railway Company requesting the names of officers authorized to sign off on free transport to avoid abuse of the privilege; letters concerning the protection of surveyors; and a petition from citizens of Rio Grande City requesting the presence of State Troops to track criminals responsible for several murders in the area.]
10. Correspondence, December 16-31, 1881
[Records include correspondence from officers of the Frontier Battalion and Adjutant General W.H. King regarding supplies and financial issues; a letter from Capt. C.L. Nevill of Company E regarding extradition of a fugitive who evaded capture by crossing into Mexico; a telegraph from the chief of police in Shreveport, Louisiana, requesting information about a reward for Mitch Cotton; letters related to a request for ranger presence in Rio Grande City; and a telegram reporting that the Mexican cavalry would be driving all outlaws out of Matamoras, Mexico, resulting in many fleeing to Texas.]
11. Correspondence, December 16-31, 1881
[Records include correspondence from officers of the Frontier Battalion and Adjutant General W.H. King regarding supplies and financial issues; a letter from the sheriff of Limestone County regarding the reward for Mitch Cotton; correspondence from various militia regarding firearms and elections; a print of minutes of a Council of Regimental Officers of the 1st Regiment Colored Volunteer Guards; and a letter from a member of Company F to Capt. T.L. Oglesby reporting his findings regarding a rash of murders in Rio Grande City.]
12. Correspondence, January 1882
[Records include correspondence from officers of the Frontier Battalion and Adjutant General W.H. King regarding supplies and financial issues; a bundle of receipts related to the furnishing of the adjutant general's office in the state capitol; requests for ranger presence in Cuero; and letters from various militia groups regarding firearms and officer elections.]
13. Correspondence, February 1882
[Records include correspondence from officers of the Frontier Battalion and Adjutant General W.H. King regarding supplies, discharges, and financial issues; letters requesting information on soldiers who fought in the Texas Revolution; a letter reporting a cadet corps that was formed at Goliad College and requesting firearms be furnished for practice; letters from various militia groups regarding firearms and officer elections; a letter from Capt. S.A. McMurray of Company B reporting that he was shot by his own pistol; a letter from attorneys prosecuting a case against three men enrolled in Company B who committed murder, requesting muster rolls and enlistment oaths for the men; and letters requesting Adjutant General King to petition the governor for funds lost during the San Elizario Salt War.]
14. Correspondence, March 1-15, 1882
[Records include correspondence from officers of the Frontier Battalion and Adjutant General W.H. King regarding supplies and financial issues; letters regarding a newspaper article about the disruptive behavior of the Navasota Guards as they returned from Mardi Gras in Galveston; letters from Capt. G.W. Baylor of Company A concerning sickness in camp; a letter requesting information on state assistance for schools where military instruction is given; and a letter from an attorney of Gonzales County refuting claims posted in local newspapers that the rangers are needed in the area, as he feels it makes the county look bad.]
15. Correspondence, March 16-31, 1882
[Records include correspondence from officers of the Frontier Battalion and Adjutant General W.H. King regarding arrests made and reports of operations; two copies of an indictment for assault; letters regarding a dispute of the discharge of a lieutenant of the Grant Rifles; a letter from Lt. L.P. Sieker of Company D concerning an article written by one of his men claiming that a dishonorable discharge handed down by Capt. G.W. Arrington of Company C was unjust; and a letter from Capt. S.A. McMurray of Company B reporting the pursuit of escaped convicts harassing Texas and Pacific Railway Company workers.]
16. Correspondence, April 1882
[Records include correspondence from officers of the Frontier Battalion and Adjutant General W.H. King regarding supplies and financial issues; telegrams regarding a train robbery and attempted derailment; a letter from Adjutant General King to Governor O.M. Roberts regarding the train robbery and reporting that the rangers are not meant to serve as detectives but that he will send men to uphold the law and arrest the culprits; a letter from the captain of the Houston Light Guard requesting a thousand cartridges for drill practice in the hopes of winning shooting contests at Volksfest; a petition to certify the Norton Greys as the first colored regiment in North Texas with a list of elected officers and their signatures; letters concerning the formation of various militia groups; and a letter from Adjutant General King to Governor Roberts responding to a request to send rangers to several settled areas in east Texas, and why he does not believe this is within the letter of the organization of the Frontier Forces.]
17. Correspondence, May 1-15, 1882
[Records include correspondence from officers of the Frontier Battalion and Adjutant General W.H. King regarding reports of operations; letters from various militia groups concerning organization and firearms; a petition from citizens of Nolan and Fisher Counties requesting Governor O.M. Roberts to set a proclamation that the open carrying of firearms be prohibited; and a letter from Capt. S.A. McMurray of Company B reporting the capture of one train robber and the pursuit of two more.]
18. Correspondence, May 16-31, 1882
[Records include correspondence from officers of the Frontier Battalion and Adjutant General W.H. King regarding supplies, financial issues and reports of operations, and letters from various militia groups regarding organization and firearms.]
19. Correspondence, June 1882
[Records include correspondence from officers of the Frontier Battalion and Adjutant General W.H. King regarding supplies, financial issues, and records of scouts; a letter from Capt. G.W. Arrington of Company C to Capt. Neal Coldwell discussing his intention to resign and requesting aid in drafting the letter; a letter from the Galveston, Harrisburg and San Antonio Railway requesting eight to ten rangers for protection and peace keeping; letters from various militia groups regarding organization and firearms; and a letter asking for information regarding volunteer guard companies taking part in the ceremony to lay the cornerstone of the new state capitol.]
20. Correspondence, July 1-15, 1882
[Records include correspondence from officers of the Frontier Battalion and Adjutant General W.H. King regarding supplies and financial issues; a letter from D.W. Roberts to Capt. Neal Coldwell thanking him for a recommendation to rejoin the service; letters regarding difficulty in gaining certification for militia groups; letters regarding a man forcibly taken from Mexico by Mexican citizens and delivered to rangers; and the resignation of Capt. G.W. Arrington from Company C.]
21. Correspondence, July 16-31, 1882
[Records include correspondence from officers of the Frontier Battalion and Adjutant General W.H. King regarding supplies, financial issues, and reports of operations; letters regarding a man kidnapped in Mexico and delivered to the rangers; letters concerning the correct captain of Roberts Rifles; and letters from various militia groups regarding organization and firearms.]
Box Folder
401-402 1. August 1-15, 1882
2. August 16-31, 1882
3. September 1882
4. October 1882
5. November 1-15, 1882
6. November 16-30, 1882
7. December 1-15, 1882
8-9. December 16-31, 1882
10. January 1883
11. February 1-15, 1883
12. February 16-28, 1883
13. March 1-15, 1883
14. March 16-31, 1883
15. April 1-15, 1883
16. April 16-30, 1883
17-18. May 1-15, 1883
19. May 16-31, 1883
20. June 1-15, 1883
21. June 16-30, 1883
Box Folder
401-403 1. July 1-15, 1883
2-3. July 16-31, 1883
4. August 1-15, 1883
5. August 16-31, 1883
6. September 1-15, 1883
7-8. September 16-30, 1883
9-10. October 1-15, 1883
11. October 16-31, 1883
12. November 1883
13. December 1-15, 1883
14. December 16-31, 1883
15-16. January 1-15, 1884
17. January 16-31, 1884
18. February 1-15, 1884
19-20. February 16-29, 1884
Box Folder
401-405A 1. October 1883-June 1884 (3A1 thru 3C22)
2. October 1883-June 1884 (3D1 thru 3K6)
3. September 1883-June 1884 (3L1 thru 3R15)
4. September 1883-June 1884 (3S1 thru 3Z1)
Box Folder
401-404 1-2. March 1-15, 1884
3-4. March 16-31, 1884
5-6. April 1-15, 1884
7-8. April 16-30, 1884
9-10. May 1-15, 1884
11-14. May 16-31, 1884
15-16. June 1-15, 1884
Box Folder
401-405 1-2. June 16-30, 1884
3-4. July 1-15, 1884
5-6. July 16-31, 1884
7-8. August 1-15, 1884
9. August 16-31, 1884
10-12. September 1-15, 1884
13. September 16-30, 1884
Box Folder
401-405B 1-2. October 1-15, 1884
3-4. October 16-31, 1884
5-6. November 1-15, 1884
7. November 16-30, 1884
8. December 1-15, 1884
9-10. December 16-31, 1884
Box Folder
401-406 1. January 1-15, 1885
2-3. January 16-31, 1885
4. February 1-15, 1885
5. February 16-28, 1885
6. March 1-15, 1885
7-8. March 16-31, 1885
9. April 1-15, 1885
10-11. April 16-30, 1885
12-13. May 1-15, 1885
14. May 16-31, 1885
15. June 1-15, 1885
16. June 16-30, 1885
17-18. July 1-15, 1885
19-20. July 16-31, 1885
Box Folder
401-407 1-2. August 1-15, 1885
3-4. August 16-31, 1885
5. September 1-15, 1885
6-7. September 16-30, 1885
8-9. October 1-15, 1885
10. October 16-31, 1885
11. November 1-15, 1885
12. November 16-30, 1885
13-14. December 1-15, 1885
15. December 16-31, 1885
16. January 1-15, 1886
17. January 16-31, 1886
18. February 1-15, 1886
19. February 16-28, 1886
Box Folder
401-408 1. March 1-15, 1886
2. March 16-31, 1886
3. April 1-15, 1886
4-5. April 16-30, 1886
6. May 1-15, 1886
7-8. May 16-31, 1886
9-10. June 1-15, 1886
11-12. June 16-30, 1886
13-14. July 1-10, 1886
15-16. July 11-20, 1886
17. July 21-31, 1886
Box Folder
401-408-B 1-3. August 1886
4-5. September 1-15, 1886
6. September 16-30, 1886
7-9. October 1-15, 1886
Box Folder
401-409 1-2. October 16-31, 1886
3. November 1-15, 1886
4-5. November 16-30, 1886
6-7. December 1-15, 1886
8. December 16-31, 1886
9-10. January 1-15, 1887
11-12. January 16-31, 1887
13-14. February 1-15, 1887
15-16. February 16-28, 1887
17-18. March 1-15, 1887
19-20. March 16-31, 1887
Box Folder
401-410 1-2. April 1-15, 1887
3-4. April 16-30, 1887
5. May 1-15, 1887
6-7. May 16-31, 1887
8. June 1-15, 1887
9-10. June 16-30, 1887
11-12. July 1-15, 1887
13-14. July 16-31, 1887
15-16. August 1-15, 1887
17-18. August 16-31, 1887
Box Folder
401-411 1-2. September 1-15, 1887
3-4. September 16-30, 1887
5-7. October 1-15, 1887
8-9. October 16-31, 1887
10. November 1-15, 1887
11-12. November 16-30, 1887
13-14. December 1-15, 1887
15. December 16-31, 1887
16. January 1-15, 1888
17. January 16-31, 1888
18. February 1-15, 1888
19-20. February 16-29, 1888
Box Folder
401-411A 1. March-September 1888 (25A1 thru 25C10)
2. June-September 1888 (25D1 thru 25H23)
3. June-September 1888 (25J1 thru 250P17)
4. June-August 1888 (25R1 thru 25W12)
Box Folder
401-412 1-2. March 1-15, 1888
3-4. March 16-31, 1888
5-6. April 1-15, 1888
7-9. April 16-30, 1888
10-11. May 1-15, 1888
12-13. May 16-31, 1888
14. June 1-15, 1888
15. June 16-30, 1888
16. July 1888
17. August 1-15, 1888
18-19. August 16-31, 1888
Box Folder
401-413 1-2. September 1-15, 1888
3-4. September 16-30, 1888
5-6. October 1-15, 1888
7-8. October 16-31, 1888
9. November 1-15, 1888
10-11. November 16-30, 1888
12-13. December 1-15, 1888
14. December 16-31, 1888
15. January 1-15, 1889
16. January 16-31, 1889
17. February 1-15, 1889
18. February 16-28, 1889
Box Folder
401-414 1. March 1-15, 1889
2-3. March 16-31, 1889
4-5. April 1-15, 1889
6-7. April 16-30, 1889
8-9. May 1-15, 1889
10-11. May 16-31, 1889
12-13. June 1-15, 1889
14-15. June 16-30, 1889
16-17. July 1-15, 1889
18-20. July 15-31, 1889
Box Folder
401-415 1-2. August 1-15, 1889
3-5. August 16-31, 1889
6-7. September 1-15, 1889
8-9. September 16-30, 1889
10-12. October 1-15, 1889
13-14. October 16-31, 1889
15-16. November 1-15, 1889
17-18. November 16-30, 1889
19-20. December 1-15, 1889
21-22. December 16-31, 1889
Box Folder
401-416 1-2. January 1-15, 1890
3-4. January 16-31, 1890
5-6. February 1-15, 1890
7-8. February 16-28, 1890
9-10. March 1-15, 1890
11-13. March 16-31, 1890
14-15. April 1-15, 1890
16-17. April 16-30, 1890
18-19. May 1-15, 1890
20-21. May 16-31, 1890
Box Folder
401-417 1-2. June 1-15, 1890
3-5. June 16-30, 1890
6-8. July 1-15, 1890
9-11. July 16-31, 1890
12-13. August 1-15, 1890
14. August 16-31, 1890
15-16. September 1-15, 1890
17. September 16-30, 1890
18-19. October 1-15, 1890
20. October 16-31, 1890
Box Folder
401-418 1. November 1-15, 1890
2. November 16-30, 1890
3-5. December 1-15, 1890
6. December 16-31, 1890
7. January 1-15, 1891
8-9. January 16-31, 1891
10-11. February 1-15, 1891
12-14. February 16-28, 1891
15-16. March 1-15, 1891
17-19. March 16-31, 1891
20-21. April 1-15, 1891
Box Folder
401-419 1-3. April 16-30, 1891
4-6. May 1-15, 1891
7-10. May 16-31, 1891
11-14. June 1-15, 1891
15-19. June 16-30, 1891
Box Folder
401-420 1-6. July 1-15, 1891
7-11. July 16-31, 1891
12-17. August 1-15, 1891
18-21. August 16-31, 1891
Box Folder
401-421 1-3. September 1-15, 1891
4-6. September 16-30, 1891
7-9. October 1-15, 1891
10-13. October 16-31, 1891
14-17. November 1-15, 1891
18-21. November 16-30, 1891
Box Folder
401-422 1-3. December 1-15, 1891
4-6. December 16-31, 1891
7-8. January 1-15, 1892
9-10. January 16-31, 1892
11-13. February 1-15, 1892
14-16. February 16-29, 1892
17-19. March 1-15, 1892
Box Folder
401-423 1-3. March 16-31, 1892
4-6. April 1-15, 1892
7-10. April 16-30, 1892
11-15. May 1-15, 1892
16-19. May 16-31, 1892
Box Folder
401-424 1-6. June 1-15, 1892
7-13. June 16-30, 1892
14-20. July 1-15, 1892
Box Folder
401-425 1-7. July 16-31, 1892
8-12. August 1-15, 1892
13-15. August 16-31, 1892
16-19. September 1-15, 1892
20-21. September 16-30, 1892
Box Folder
401-426 1-3. October 1-15, 1892
4-5. October 16-31, 1892
6-7. November 1-15, 1892
8-10. November 16-30, 1892
11-13. December 1-15, 1892
14-15. December 16-31, 1892
16-18. January 1-15, 1893
Box Folder
401-427 1-4. January 16-31, 1893
5-7. February 1-15, 1893
8-10. February 16-28, 1893
11-13. March 1-15, 1893
14-16. March 16-31, 1893
17-19. April 1-15, 1893
20-21. April 16-30, 1893
Box Folder
401-428 1-3. May 1-15, 1893
4-8. May 16-31, 1893
9-13. June 1-15, 1893
14-17. June 16-30, 1893
18-20. July 1-5, 1893
21-22. July 6-10, 1893
Box Folder
401-429 1-3. July 11-15, 1893
4-7. July 16-31, 1893
8-11. August 1-15, 1893
12-15. August 16-31, 1893
16-18. September 1-15, 1893
Box Folder
401-430 1-3. September 16-30, 1893
4-6. October 1-15, 1893
7-8. October 16-31, 1893
9-11. November 1-15, 1893
12-14. November 16-30, 1893
15-18. December 1-15, 1893
19-21. December 16-31, 1893
Box Folder
401-431 1-3. January 1-15, 1894
4-5. January 16-31, 1894
6-7. February 1-15, 1894
8-9. February 16-28, 1894
10-11. March 1-15, 1894
12-14. March 16-31, 1894
15-17. April 1-15, 1894
18-20. April 16-30, 1894
Box Folder
401-432 1-3. May 1-15, 1894
4-7. May 16-31, 1894
8-12. June 1-15, 1894
13-19. June 16-30, 1894
Box Folder
401-433 1-3. July 1-7, 1894
4-8. July 8-15, 1894
9-11. July 16-22, 1894
12-14. July 23-31, 1894
15-17. August 1-15, 1894
18-20. August 16-31, 1894
Box Folder
401-434 1-3. September 1-15, 1894
4-6. September 16-30, 1894
7-8. October 1-15, 1894
9-11. October 16-31, 1894
12-14. November 1-15, 1894
15-17. November 16-30, 1894
18-20. December 1-15, 1894
21-23. December 16-31, 1894
Box Folder
401-435 1.2. January 1-15, 1895
3-4. January 16-31, 1895
5-7. February 1-15, 1895
8-10. February 16-28, 1895
11-13. March 1-15, 1895
14-16. March 16-31, 1895
17-19. April 1-15, 1895
20-22. April 16-30, 1895
Box Folder
401-436 1-3. May 1-15, 1895
4-6. May 16-31, 1895
7-9. June 1-15, 1895
10-12. June 16-30, 1895
13-15. July 1-15, 1895
16-18. July 16-31, 1895
19-22. August 1-15, 1895
23. August 16-31, 1895
Box Folder
401-437 1-2. September 1-15, 1895
3-4. September 16-30, 1895
5-7. October 1-15, 1895
8-9. October 16-31, 1895
10-13. November 1-15, 1895
14-16. November 16-30, 1895
17-19. December 1-15, 1895
20-22. December 16-31, 1895
Box Folder
401-438 1-3. January 1-15, 1896
4-7. January 16-31, 1896
8-9. February 1-15, 1896
10-12. February 16-29, 1896
13-14. March 1-15, 1896
15-18. March 16-31, 1896
19-21. April 1-15, 1896
Box Folder
401-439 1-3. April 16-30, 1896
4-7. May 1-15, 1896
8-10. May 16-31, 1896
11-12. June 1-7, 1896
13-14. June 8-15, 1896
15-16. June 16-22, 1896
17-19. June 23-30, 1896
20-21. July 1-7, 1896
Box Folder
401-440 1-2. July 8-15, 1896
3-4. July 16-31, 1896
5-8. August 1-15, 1896
9-11. August 16-31, 1896
12-13. September 1-15, 1896
14-15. September 16-30, 1896
16-17. October 1-15, 1896
18-20. October 16-31, 1896
Box Folder
401-441 1-2. November 1-15, 1896
3-4. November 16-30, 1896
5-7. December 1-15, 1896
8-9. December 16-31, 1896
10-12. January 1-15, 1897
13-15. January 16-31, 1897
16-17. February 1-7, 1897
18-19. February 8-15, 1897
20-21. February 16-28, 1897
Box Folder
401-442 1-2. March 1-15, 1897
3-5. March 16-31, 1897
6-8. April 1-15, 1897
9-10. April 16-30, 1897
11-14. May 1-15, 1897
15. May 16-22, 1897
16-20. May 23-31, 1897
21-24. June 1-7, 1897
Box Folder
401-443 1-5. June 8-15, 1897
6-10. June 16-22, 1897
11-15. June 23-30, 1897
16-21. July 1-7, 1897
Box Folder
401-444 1-8. July 8-15, 1897
9-11. July 16-22, 1897
12-15. July 23-31, 1897
16-18. August 1-7, 1897
19-20. August 8-15, 1897
Box Folder
401-445 1-3. August 16-31, 1897
4-6. September 1-15, 1897
7-9. September 16-30, 1897
10-13. October 1-15, 1897
14. October 16-31, 1897
15-16. November 1-7, 1897
17-18. November 8-15, 1897
19-21. November 16-30, 1897
Box Folder
401-446 1-3. December 1-15, 1897
4-5. December 16-31, 1897
6-8. January 1-15, 1898
9-10. January 16-31, 1898
11-13. February 1-15, 1898
14-16. February 16-28, 1898
17-18. March 1-7, 1898
19-20. March 8-15, 1898
21. March 16-22, 1898
22-24. March 23-31, 1898
Box Folder
401-447 1-3. April 1-7, 1898
4-6. April 8-15, 1898
7-10. April 16-22, 1898
11-21. April 23-30, 1898
Box Folder
401-448 1-4. May 1-7, 1898
5. May 8-15, 1898
6. May 16-22, 1898
7-9. May 23-31, 1898
10-11. June 1-15, 1898
12-13. June 16-22, 1898
14-16. June 23-30, 1898
17-18. July 1-7, 1898
19-20. July 8-15, 1898
Box Folder
401-449 1-2. July 16-31, 1898
3-4. August 1-15, 1898
5-7. August 16-31, 1898
8-10. September 1-15, 1898
11-12. September 16-30, 1898
13. October 1-15, 1898
14-15. October 16-31, 1898
16-18. November 1-15, 1898
19-20. November 16-30, 1898
21. December 1-15, 1898
22-23. December 16-31, 1898
24. undated [1898]
Box Folder
401-450 1-2. January 1-15, 1899
3. January 16-22, 1899
4-5. January 23-31, 1899
6-8. February 1-15, 1899
9-11. February 16-22, 1899
12-13. February 23-28, 1899
14-16. March 1-7, 1899
17-18. March 8-15, 1899
19-22. March 16-31, 1899
Box Folder
401-451 1-2. April 1-7, 1899
3-4. April 8-15, 1899
5-6. April 16-22, 1899
7-8. April 23-30, 1899
9-10. May 1-7, 1899
11-12. May 8-15, 1899
13-14. May 16-22, 1899
15-16. May 23-31, 1899
17-19. June 1-7, 1899
20-22. June 8-15, 1899
Box Folder
401-452 1-2. June 16-22, 1899
3-6. June 23-30, 1899
7-9. July 1-7, 1899
10-12. July 8-15, 1899
13-15. July 16-22, 1899
16-19. July 23-31, 1899
20-21. August 1-7, 1899
Box Folder
401-453 1-3. August 8-15, 1899
4-6. August 16-22, 1899
7-8. August 23-31, 1899
9-10. September 1-15, 1899
11-12. September 16-30, 1899
13-14. October 1-7, 1899
15-16. October 8-15, 1899
17-18. October 16-22, 1899
19-22. October 23-31, 1899
Box Folder
401-454 1-4. November 1-7, 1899
5-8. November 8-15, 1899
9-13. November 16-22, 1899
14-18. November 23-30, 1899
19-20. December 1-7, 1899
Box Folder
401-455 1-5. December 8-15, 1899
6-8. December 16-22, 1899
9-14. December 23-31, 1899
15-16. January 1-7, 1900
17-18. January 8-15, 1900
19. January 16-31, 1900
20-21. February 1-15, 1900
Box Folder
401-456 1-2. February 16-29, 1900
3-4. March 1-7, 1900
5-7. March 8-15, 1900
8-9. March 16-22, 1900
10-12. March 23-31, 1900
13-15. April 1-7, 1900
16-18. April 8-15, 1900
19-23. April 16-22, 1900
Box Folder
401-457 1-4. April 23-30, 1900
5-7. May 1-7, 1900
8-11. May 8-15, 1900
12-14. May 16-22, 1900
15-21. May 23-31, 1900
22-25. June 1-7, 1900
Box Folder
401-458 1-3. June 8-15, 1900
4-8. June 16-22, 1900
9-14. June 23-30, 1900
15-18. July 1-7, 1900
Box Folder
401-459 1-7. July 8-15, 1900
8-13. July 16-22, 1900
14-16. July 23-31, 1900
17-20. August 1-7, 1900
Box Folder
401-460 1-3. August 8-15, 1900
4-5. August 16-22, 1900
6-10. August 23-31, 1900
11-13. September 1-7, 1900
14-24. September 8-15, 1900
Box Folder
401-461 1-17. September 16-22, 1900
18-20. September 23-30, 1900
Box Folder
401-462 1-3. October 1-15, 1900
4-5. October 16-31, 1900
6-7. November 1-15, 1900
8. November 16-30, 1900
9. December 1-15, 1900
10-11. December 16-31, 1900
12-13. January 1-15, 1901
14-15. January 16-22, 1901
16. January 23-31, 1901
17. February 1-7, 1901
18. February 8-15, 1901
19-20. February 16-22, 1901
21-22. February 23-28, 1901
23-24. March 1-7, 1901
25-27. March 8-15, 1901
Box Folder
401-463 1-2. March 16-22, 1901
3-4. March 23-31, 1901
5-7. April 1-7, 1901
8-10. April 8-15, 1901
11-13. April 16-22, 1901
14-17. April 23-30, 1901
18-19. May 1-7, 1901
20-21. May 8-15, 1901
22-25. May 16-22, 1901
Box Folder
401-464 1-4. May 23-31, 1901
5-9. June 1-7, 1901
10-12. June 8-15, 1901
13-16. June 16-22, 1901
17-19. June 23-30, 1901
20. July 1-7, 1901
21-23. July 8-15, 1901
Box Folder
401-465 1-2. July 16-22, 1901
3-5. July 23-31, 1901
6-7. August 1-15, 1901
8-9. August 16-31, 1901
10-12. September 1-7, 1901
13-14. September 8-15, 1901
15-16. September 16-22, 1901
17-19. September 23-30, 1901
20. October 1-7, 1901
21-22. October 8-15, 1901
23. October 16-22, 1901
Box Folder
401-466 1-2. October 23-31, 1901
3. November 1-7, 1901
4-5. November 8-15, 1901
6-9. November 16-22, 1901
10-12. November 23-30, 1901
13-16. December 1-7, 1901
17-19. December 8-15, 1901
20-22. December 16-22, 1901
23-25. December 23-31, 1901
Box Folder
401-467 1-3. January 1-7, 1902
4-7. January 8-15, 1902
8-10. January 16-22, 1902
11-14. January 23-31, 1902
15-17. February 1-7, 1902
18-21. February 8-15, 1902
22-24. February 16-22, 1902
Box Folder
401-468 1-3. February 23-28, 1902
4-6. March 1-7, 1902
7-8. March 8-15, 1902
9-13. March 16-22, 1902
14-17. March 23-31, 1902
18-21. April 1-7, 1902
22-24. April 8-15, 1902
Box Folder
401-469 1-3. April 16-22, 1902
4-6. April 23-30, 1902
7-9. May 1-7, 1902
10-13. May 8-15, 1902
14-17. May 16-22, 1902
18-21. May 23-31, 1902
22-24. June 1-7, 1902
Box Folder
401-470 1-3. June 8-15, 1902
4-7. June 16-22, 1902
8-12. June 23-30, 1902
13-17. July 1-7, 1902
18-26. July 8-15, 1902
Box Folder
401-471 1-6. July 16-22, 1902
7-11. July 23-31, 1902
12-14. August 1-7, 1902
15-17. August 8-15, 1902
18-22. August 16-22, 1902
Box Folder
401-472 1-4. August 23-31, 1902
5-7. September 1-7, 1902
8-10. September 8-15, 1902
11-13. September 16-22, 1902
14-16. September 23-30, 1902
17-19. October 1-7, 1902
20-22. October 8-15, 1902
23-25. October 16-22, 1902
Box Folder
401-473 1-3. October 23-31, 1902
4-5. November 1-7, 1902
6-7. November 8-15, 1902
8-9. November 16-22, 1902
10-11. November 23-30, 1902
12-13. December 1-7, 1902
14-16. December 8-15, 1902
17-19. December 16-22, 1902
20-21. December 23-31, 1902
22-25. January 1-7, 1903
Box Folder
401-474 1-2. January 8-15, 1903
3-5. January 16-22, 1903
6-8. January 23-31, 1903
9-12. February 1-7, 1903
13-16. February 8-15, 1903
17-19. February 16-22, 1903
20-22. February 23-28, 1903
23-25. March 1-7, 1903
Box Folder
401-475 1-3. March 8-15, 1903
4-6. March 16-22, 1903
7-10. March 23-31, 1903
11-13. April 1-7, 1903
14-18. April 8-15, 1903
19-23. April 16-22, 1903
Box Folder
401-476 1-6. April 23-30, 1903
7-10. May 1-7, 1903
11-14. May 8-15, 1903
15-17. May 16-22, 1903
18-20. May 23-31, 1903
21-22. June 1-7, 1903
23-25. June 8-15, 1903
Box Folder
401-477 1-2. June 16-22, 1903
3-5. June 23-30, 1903
6-8. July 1-7, 1903
9-15. July 8-15, 1903
16-19. July 16-22, 1903
20-23. July 23-31, 1903
24-26. August 1-7, 1903
Box Folder
401-478 1-3. August 8-15, 1903
4-5. August 16-22, 1903
6-8. August 23-31, 1903
9-11. September 1-7, 1903
12-13. September 8-15, 1903
14-15. September 16-22, 1903
16-17. September 23-30, 1903
18-21. October 1-7, 1903
22-25. October 8-15, 1903
26-28. October 16-22, 1903
Box Folder
401-479 1-4. October 23-31, 1903
5-7. November 1-7, 1903
8-9. November 8-15, 1903
10-12. November 16-22, 1903
13-14. November 23-30, 1903
15-16. December 1-7, 1903
17-18. December 8-15, 1903
19-21. December 16-22, 1903
22-24. December 23-31, 1903
25-27. January 1-7, 1904
Box Folder
401-480 1-4. January 8-15, 1904
5-7. January 16-22, 1904
8-10. January 23-31, 1904
11-12. February 1-7, 1904
13-18. February 8-15, 1904
19-21. February 16-22, 1904
22-25. February 23-29, 1904
26-28. March 1-7, 1904
29-31. March 8-15, 1904
Box Folder
401-481 1-2. March 16-22, 1904
3-6. March 23-31, 1904
7-9. April 1-7, 1904
10-12. April 8-15, 1904
13-14. April 16-22, 1904
15-16. April 23-30, 1904
17-21. May 1-7, 1904
22-24. May 8-15, 1904
25-27. May 16-22, 1904
28-31. May 23-31, 1904
Box Folder
401-482 1-5. June 1-7, 1904
6-9. June 8-15, 1904
10-12. June 16-22, 1904
13-18. June 23-30, 1904
19-21. July 1-7, 1904
22-24. July 8-15, 1904
25-28. July 16-22, 1904
Box Folder
401-483 1-5. July 23-31, 1904
6-9. August 1-7, 1904
10-14. August 8-15, 1904
15-17. August 16-22, 1904
18-23. August 23-31, 1904
24-25. September 1-7, 1904
26-30. September 8-15, 1904
Box Folder
401-484 1-2. September 16-22, 1904
3-6. September 23-30, 1904
7-10. October 1-7, 1904
11-13. October 8-15, 1904
14-15. October 16-22, 1904
16-18. October 23-31, 1904
19-21. November 1-7, 1904
22-24. November 8-15, 1904
25-26. November 16-22, 1904
27-29. November 23-30, 1904
30-31. December 1-7, 1904
Box Folder
401-485 1-6. December 8-15, 1904
7-8. December 16-22, 1904
9-13. December 23-31, 1904
14-17. January 1-7, 1905
18-19. January 8-15, 1905
20-21. January 16-22, 1905
22-24. January 23-31, 1905
25. February 1-7, 1905
26-27. February 8-15, 1905
28-29. February 16-22, 1905
30. February 23-28, 1905
Box Folder
401-486 1. March 1-7, 1905
2-3. March 8-15, 1905
4-5. March 16-22, 1905
6-9. March 23-31, 1905
10-11. April 1-7, 1905
12-13. April 8-15, 1905
14. April 16-22, 1905
15. April 23-30, 1905
16. May 1-7, 1905
17-18. May 8-15, 1905
19. May 16-22, 1905
20-22. May 23-31, 1905
23-24. June 1-7, 1905
25-26. June 8-15, 1905
27-28. June 16-22, 1905
29-31. June 23-30, 1905
Box Folder
401-487 1-5. July 1-7, 1905
6-16. July 8-15, 1905
17-23. July 16-22, 1905
24-30. July 23-31, 1905
Box Folder
401-488 1-7. August 1-7, 1905
8-11. August 8-15, 1905
12-14. August 16-22, 1905
15-18. August 23-31, 1905
19-21. September 1-7, 1905
22-24. September 8-15, 1905
25-26. September 16-22, 1905
27-29. September 23-30, 1905
30. October 1-7, 1905
31. October 8-15, 1905
Box Folder
401-489 1-3. October 16-22, 1905
4-8. October 23-31, 1905
9-11. November 1-7, 1905
12-14. November 8-15, 1905
15-18. November 16-22, 1905
19-25. November 23-30, 1905
26-28. December 1-7, 1905
29-30. December 8-15, 1905
Box Folder
401-490 1-3. December 16-22, 1905
4-6. December 23-31, 1905
Correspondence, 1906-1943
Box Folder
401-490 7-12. January 1-7, 1906
13-17. January 8-15, 1906
18-23. January 16-22, 1906
24-28. January 23-31, 1906
29-31. February 1-7, 1906
Box Folder
401-491 1-3. February 8-15, 1906
4-9. February 16-22, 1906
10-12. February 23-28, 1906
13-15. March 1-7, 1906
16-20. March 8-15, 1906
21-26. March 16-22, 1906
27-33. March 23-31, 1906
Box Folder
401-492 1-6. April 1-7, 1906
7-12. April 8-15, 1906
13-15. April 16-22, 1906
16-18. April 23-30, 1906
19-21. May 1-7, 1906
22-25. May 8-15, 1906
26-29. May 16-22, 1906
Box Folder
401-493 1-5. May 23-31, 1906
6-10. June 1-7, 1906
11-18. June 8-15, 1906
19-25. June 16-22, 1906
Box Folder
401-494 1-9. June 23-30, 1906
10-13. July 1-7, 1906
14-19. July 8-15, 1906
20-28. July 16-22, 1906
Box Folder
401-495 1-15. July 23-31, 1906
16-23. August 1-7, 1906
24-26. August 8-15, 1906
27-28. August 16-22, 1906
Box Folder
401-496 1-7. August 23-31, 1906
8-10. September 1-7, 1906
11-16. September 8-15, 1906
17-21. September 16-22, 1906
22-25. September 23-30, 1906
26-29. October 1-7, 1906
Box Folder
401-497 1-5. October 8-15, 1906
6-8. October 16-22, 1906
9-11. October 23-31, 1906
12-13. November 1-7, 1906
14-16. November 8-15, 1906
17-19. November 16-22, 1906
20-22. November 23-30, 1906
23-26. December 1-7, 1906
27-29. December 8-15, 1906
Box Folder
401-498 1-3. December 16-22, 1906
4-6. December 23-31, 1906
7-8. January 1-7, 1907
9-10. January 8-15, 1907
11-12. January 16-22, 1907
13-17. January 23-31, 1907
18-22. February 1-7, 1907
23-26. February 8-15, 1907
Box Folder
401-499 1-6. February 16-22, 1907
7-9. February 23-28, 1907
10-12. March 1-7, 1907
13-17. March 8-15, 1907
18-22. March 16-22, 1907
23-27. March 23-31, 1907
Box Folder
401-500 1-6. April 1-7, 1907
7-10. April 8-15, 1907
11-14. April 16-22, 1907
15-19. April 23-30, 1907
20-23. May 1-7, 1907
24-29. May 8-15, 1907
Box Folder
401-501 1-4. May 16-22, 1907
5-9. May 23-31, 1907
10-12. June 1-7, 1907
13-17. June 8-15, 1907
18-21. June 16-22, 1907
22-26. June 23-30, 1907
Box Folder
401-502 1-7. July 1-7, 1907
8-19. July 8-15, 1907
20-25. July 16-18, 1907
Box Folder
401-503 1-5. July 19-22, 1907
6-15. July 23-31, 1907
16-22. August 1-7, 1907
23-29. August 8-15, 1907
Box Folder
401-504 1-4. August 16-22, 1907
5-10. August 23-31, 1907
11-14. September 1-7, 1907
15-21. September 8-15, 1907
22-27. September 16-21, 1907
Box Folder
401-505 1-6. September 23-30, 1907
7-10. October 1-7, 1907
11-15. October 8-15, 1907
16-19. October 16-22, 1907
20-24. October 23-31, 1907
25-28. November 1-7, 1907
Box Folder
401-506 1-5. November 8-15, 1907
6-9. November 16-22, 1907
10-12. November 23-30, 1907
13-16. December 1-7, 1907
17-20. December 8-15, 1907
21-24. December 16-22, 1907
25-28. December 23-31, 1907
Box Folder
401-507 1-5. January 1-7, 1908
6-11. January 8-15, 1908
12-14. January 16-22, 1908
15-19. January 23-31, 1908
20-23. February 1-7, 1908
24-27. February 8-15, 1908
Box Folder
401-508 1-3. February 16-22, 1908
4-7. February 23-29, 1908
8-10. March 1-7, 1908
11-16. March 8-15, 1908
17-20. March 16-22, 1908
21-25. March 23-31, 1908
26-29. April 1-7, 1908
Box Folder
401-509 1-5. April 8-15, 1908
6-8. April 16-22, 1908
9-12. April 23-30, 1908
13-15. May 1-7, 1908
16-20. May 8-15, 1908
21-27. May 16-22, 1908
Box Folder
401-510 1-8. May 23-31, 1908
9-14. June 1-7, 1908
15-24. June 8-15, 1908
Box Folder
401-511 1-8. June 16-22, 1908
9-23. June 23-30, 1908
24-27. July 1-7, 1908
Box Folder
401-512 1-5. July 8-15, 1908
6-15. July 16-22, 1908
16-25. July 23-31, 1908
Box Folder
401-513 1-7. August 1-7, 1908
8-13. August 8-15, 1908
14-17. August 16-22, 1908
18-22. August 23-31, 1908
23-25. September 1-7, 1908
26-29. September 8-15, 1908
Box Folder
401-514 1-2. September 8-15, 1908 (continued)
3-10. September 16-22, 1908
11-16. September 23-30, 1908
17-20. October 1-7, 1908
21-25. October 8-15, 1908
26-28. October 16-22, 1908
Box Folder
401-515 1-6. October 23-31, 1908
7-9. November 1-7, 1908
10-14. November 8-15, 1908
15-17. November 16-22, 1908
18-21. November 23-30, 1908
22-24. December 1-7, 1908
25-28. December 8-15, 1908
Box Folder
401-516 1-4. December 16-22, 1908
5-8. December 23-31, 1908
9-13. January 1-7, 1909
14-18. January 8-15, 1909
19-22. January 16-22, 1909
23-27. January 23-31, 1909
Box Folder
401-517 1-4. February 1-7, 1909
5-9. February 8-15, 1909
10-13. February 16-22, 1909
14-17. February 23-28, 1909
18-22. March 1-7, 1909
23-27. March 8-15, 1909
Box Folder
401-518 1-4. March 16-22, 1909
5-11. March 23-31, 1909
12-16. April 1-7, 1909
17-22. April 8-15, 1909
23-27. April 16-22, 1909
Box Folder
401-519 1-5. April 23-30, 1909
6-8. May 1-7, 1909
9-12. May 8-15, 1909
13-18. May 16-22, 1909
19-23. May 23-31, 1909
24-30. June 1-7, 1909
Box Folder
401-520 1-8. June 8-15, 1909
9-17. June 16-22, 1909
18-25. June 23-30, 1909
Box Folder
401-521 1-6. July 1-7, 1909
7-10. July 8-15, 1909
11-16. July 16-22, 1909
17-24. July 23-31, 1909
Box Folder
401-522 1-5. August 1-7, 1909
6-9. August 8-15, 1909
10-13. August 16-22, 1909
14-17. August 23-31, 1909
18-20. September 1-7, 1909
21-24. September 8-15, 1909
25-29. September 16-22, 1909
Box Folder
401-523 1-4. September 23-30, 1909
5-8. October 1-7, 1909
9-12. October 8-15, 1909
13-16. October 16-22, 1909
17-21. October 23-31, 1909
22-24. November 1-7, 1909
Box Folder
401-524 1-5. November 8-15, 1909
6-9. November 16-22, 1909
10-13. November 23-30, 1909
14-16. December 1-7, 1909
17-20. December 8-15, 1909
21-23. December 16-22, 1909
24-26. December 23-31, 1909
Box Folder
401-525 1-3. January 1-7, 1910
4-7. January 8-15, 1910
8-10. January 16-22, 1910
11-14. January 23-31, 1910
15-17. February 1-7, 1910
18-21. February 8-15, 1910
22-24. February 16-22, 1910
25-27. February 23-28, 1910
28-29. March 1-7, 1910
30-32. March 8-15, 1910
33-35. March 16-22, 1910
Box Folder
401-526 1-3. March 23-31, 1910
4-5. April 1-7, 1910
6-8. April 8-15, 1910
9-10. April 16-22, 1910
11-12. April 23-30, 1910
13-15. May 1-7, 1910
16-18. May 8-15, 1910
19-21. May 16-22, 1910
22-24. May 23-31, 1910
Box Folder
401-527 1-2. June 1-7, 1910
3-4. June 8-15, 1910
5-6. June 16-22, 1910
7-9. June 23-30, 1910
10-11. July 1-7, 1910
12-14. July 8-15, 1910
15-18. July 16-22, 1910
19-21. July 23-31, 1910
22-23. August 1-7, 1910
Box Folder
401-528 1-3. August 8-15, 1910
4-5. August 16-22, 1910
6-7. August 23-31, 1910
8-9. September 1-7, 1910
10-13. September 8-15, 1910
14-15. September 16-22, 1910
16-17. September 23-30, 1910
18-19. October 1-15, 1910
20-21. October 16-31, 1910
22-23. November 1-15, 1910
Box Folder
401-529 1-3. November 16-30, 1910
4-5. December 1-15, 1910
6-8. December 16-31, 1910
9. undated [1910?]
10-11. January 1-15, 1911
12-14. January 16-31, 1911
15-16. February 1-7, 1911
17-19. February 8-15, 1911
20-21. February 16-22, 1911
22-23. February 23-28, 1911
24-25. March 1-7, 1911
Box Folder
401-530 1-3. March 8-15, 1911
4-6. March 16-22, 1911
7-9. March 23-31, 1911
10-11. April 1-7, 1911
12-13. April 8-15, 1911
14-16. April 16-22, 1911
17-18. April 23-30, 1911
Box Folder
401-531 1-2. May 1-7, 1911
3-5. May 8-15, 1911
6. May 16-22, 1911
7-8. May 23-31, 1911
9. June 1-7, 1911
10-12. June 8-15, 1911
13-15. June 16-22, 1911
16-18. June 23-30, 1911
19-20. July 1-7, 1911
21-23. July 8-15, 1911
Box Folder
401-532 1-3. July 16-22, 1911
4-6. July 23-31, 1911
7-8. August 1-7, 1911
9. August 8-15, 1911
10-11. August 16-22, 1911
12-13. August 23-31, 1911
14-15. September 1-7, 1911
16-18. September 8-15, 1911
19-20. September 16-22, 1911
21-22. September 23-30, 1911
23-25. October 1-7, 1911
26-28. October 8-15, 1911
Box Folder
401-533 1-2. October 16-22, 1911
3-5. October 23-31, 1911
6-7. November 1-7, 1911
8-9. November 8-15, 1911
10-12. November 16-22, 1911
13-14. November 23-30, 1911
15-17. December 1-7, 1911
18-19. December 8-15, 1911
20-21. December 16-22, 1911
22-24. December 23-31, 1911
25. undated [1911?]
26-27. January 1-7, 1912
28-29. January 8-15, 1912
30. January 16-31, 1912
Box Folder
401-534 1. February 1-29, 1912
2. March 1-31, 1912
3. April 1-30, 1912
4. May 1-31, 1912
5. June 1-30, 1912
6. July 1-31, 1912
7. August 1-31, 1912
8. September 1-30, 1912
9. October 1-31, 1912
10-11. November 1-30, 1912
12. December 1-31, 1912
13-14. January 1-7, 1913
15-17. January 8-15, 1913
18-21. January 16-22, 1913
22-25. January 23-31, 1913
26-28. February 1-7, 1913
Box Folder
401-535 1-5. February 8-15, 1913
6-10. February 16-22, 1913
11-15. February 23-28, 1913
16-18. March 1-7, 1913
19-22. March 8-15, 1913
23-25. March 16-22, 1913
26-29. March 23-31, 1913
Box Folder
401-536 1-4. April 1-7, 1913
5-8. April 8-15, 1913
9-11. April 16-22, 1913
12-15. April 23-30, 1913
16-18. May 1-7, 1913
19-23. May 8-15, 1913
24-25. May 16-22, 1913
26-28. May 23-31, 1913
Box Folder
401-537 1-4. June 1-7, 1913
5-8. June 8-15, 1913
9-11. June 16-22, 1913
12-14. June 23-30, 1913
15-17. July 1-7, 1913
18-21. July 8-15, 1913
22-24. July 16-22, 1913
25-27. July 23-31, 1913
Box Folder
401-538 1-2. August 1-7, 1913
3-5. August 8-15, 1913
6-8. August 16-22, 1913
9-10. August 23-31, 1913
11-12. September 1-7, 1913
13-14. September 8-15, 1913
15-16. September 16-22, 1913
17-19. September 23-30, 1913
20-21. October 1-7, 1913
22-25. October 8-15, 1913
Box Folder
401-539 1-4. October 16-22, 1913
5-10. October 23-31, 1913
11-14. November 1-7, 1913
15-19. November 8-15, 1913
20-24. November 16-22, 1913
Box Folder
401-540 1-5. November 23-30, 1913
6-9. December 1-7, 1913
10-12. December 8-15, 1913
13-15. December 16-22, 1913
16-18. December 23-31, 1913
19. undated [1913?]
20-23. January 1-7, 1914
Box Folder
401-541 1-4. January 8-15, 1914
5-7. January 16-22, 1914
8-11. January 23-31, 1914
12-14. February 1-7, 1914
15-18. February 8-15, 1914
19-21. February 16-22, 1914
22-23. February 23-28, 1914
24-26. March 1-7, 1914
Box Folder
401-542 1-3. March 8-15, 1914
4-6. March 16-22, 1914
7-11. March 23-31, 1914
12-16. April 1-7, 1914
17-23. April 8-15, 1914
Box Folder
401-543 1-7. April 16-22, 1914
8-19. April 23-30, 1914
20-23. May 1-7, 1914
Box Folder
401-544 1-7. May 8-15, 1914
8-13. May 16-22, 1914
14-17. May 23-31, 1914
18-21. June 1-7, 1914
22-26. June 8-15, 1914
Box Folder
401-545 1-3. June 16-22, 1914
4-8. June 23-30, 1914
9-10. July 1-7, 1914
11-15. July 8-15, 1914
16-18. July 16-22, 1914
19-22. July 23-31, 1914
23-26. August 1-7, 1914
Box Folder
401-546 1-4. August 8-15, 1914
5. August 16-22, 1914
6-7. August 23-31, 1914
8-10. September 1-7, 1914
11-14. September 8-15, 1914
15-16. September 16-22, 1914
17-18. September 23-30, 1914
19-20. October 1-7, 1914
21-22. October 8-15, 1914
23-24. October 16-22, 1914
Box Folder
401-547 1-4. October 23-31, 1914
5-7. November 1-7, 1914
8-9. November 8-15, 1914
10-12. November 16-22, 1914
13-16. November 23-30, 1914
17-19. December 1-7, 1914
20-22. December 8-15, 1914
23-24. December 16-22, 1914
25-27. December 23-31, 1914
28. undated [1914?]
Box Folder
401-548 1-3. January 1-15, 1915
4-7. January 16-31, 1915
8-9. February 1-7, 1915
10-12. February 8-15, 1915
13-15. February 16-22, 1915
16-19. February 23-28, 1915
20-23. March 1-7, 1915
24-26. March 8-15, 1915
27-29. March 16-22, 1915
Box Folder
401-549 1-3. March 23-31, 1915
4-6. April 1-7, 1915
7-9. April 8-15, 1915
10-12. April 16-22, 1915
13-15. April 23-30, 1915
16-17. May 1-7, 1915
18-19. May 8-15, 1915
20-21. May 16-22, 1915
22-23. May 23-31, 1915
24-26. June 1-7, 1915
Box Folder
401-550 1-3. June 8-15, 1915
4-6. June 16-22, 1915
7-8. June 23-30, 1915
9-10. July 1-7, 1915
11-12. July 8-15, 1915
13-14. July 16-22, 1915
15-16. July 23-31, 1915
17-19. August 1-7, 1915
20-24. August 8-15, 1915
Box Folder
401-551 1-5. August 16-22, 1915
6-9. August 23-31, 1915
10-12. September 1-7, 1915
13-15. September 8-15, 1915
16-19. September 16-22, 1915
20-22. September 23-30, 1915
23-24. October 1-7, 1915
Box Folder
401-552 1-2. October 8-15, 1915
3-4. October 16-22, 1915
5-7. October 23-31, 1915
8-10. November 1-7, 1915
11-12. November 8-15, 1915
13. November 16-22, 1915
14-15. November 23-30, 1915
16-17. December 1-7, 1915
18-19. December 8-15, 1915
20. December 16-22, 1915
21-22. December 23-31, 1915
23. undated [1915?]
24-25. January 1-7, 1916
Box Folder
401-553 1-2. January 8-15, 1916
3. January 16-22, 1916
4-5. January 23-31, 1916
6-7. February 1-7, 1916
8-9. February 8-15, 1916
10-11. February 16-22, 1916
12-13. February 23-29, 1916
14. March 1-7, 1916
15. March 8-15, 1916
16-20. March 16-22, 1916
21-27. March 23-31, 1916
Box Folder
401-554 1-2. April 1-7, 1916
3-6. April 8-15, 1916
7-9. April 16-22, 1916
10-11. April 23-30, 1916
12-14. May 1-7, 1916
15-25. May 8-15, 1916
Box Folder
401-555 1-8. May 8-15, 1916 (continued)
9-19. May 16-22, 1916
20-24. May 23-31, 1916
Box Folder
401-556 1-7. May 23-31, 1916 (continued)
8-12. June 1-7, 1916
13-18. June 8-15, 1916
19-25. June 16-22, 1916
Box Folder
401-557 1-3. June 16-22, 1916 (continued)
4-16. June 23-30, 1916
17-23. July 1-7, 1916
24-29. July 8-15, 1916
Box Folder
401-558 1-5. July 16-22, 1916
6-11. July 23-31, 1916
12-14. August 1-7, 1916
15-17. August 8-15, 1916
18-19. August 16-22, 1916
20-22. August 23-31, 1916
Box Folder
401-559 1-3. September 1-7, 1916
4-5. September 8-15, 1916
6-7. September 16-22, 1916
8-10. September 23-30, 1916
11-12. October 1-7, 1916
13-14. October 8-15, 1916
15-16. October 16-22, 1916
17. October 23-31, 1916
18-19. November 1-7, 1916
20-21. November 8-15, 1916
22. November 16-22, 1916
23. November 23-30, 1916
Box Folder
401-560 1-2. December 1-7, 1916
3-4. December 8-15, 1916
5-6. December 16-22, 1916
7-8. December 23-31, 1916
9. undated [1916?]
10. January 1-7, 1917
11. January 8-15, 1917
12. January 16-31, 1917
13-14. February 1-15, 1917
15. February 16-28, 1917
16. March 1-7, 1917
17. March 8-15, 1917
18. March 16-22, 1917
19-21. March 23-31, 1917
22-28. April 1-7, 1917
Box Folder
401-561 1-10. April 8-15, 1917
11-19. April 16-22, 1917
20-24. April 23-30, 1917
Box Folder
401-562 1-8. April 23-30, 1917 (continued)
9-23. May 1-7, 1917
Box Folder
401-563 1-19. May 8-15, 1917
20-26. May 16-22, 1917
Box Folder
401-564 1-9. May 16-22, 1917 (continued)
10-24. May 23-31, 1917
Box Folder
401-565 1-12. May 23-31, 1917 (continued)
13-25. June 1-7, 1917
Box Folder
401-566 1-8. June 1-7, 1917 (continued)
9-24. June 8-15, 1917
Box Folder
401-567 1-5. June 8-15, 1917 (continued)
6-19. June 16-22, 1917
20-25. June 23-30, 1917
Box Folder
401-568 1-7. June 23-30, 1917 (continued)
8-15. July 1-7, 1917
16-23. July 8-15, 1917
Box Folder
401-569 1-4. July 8-15, 1917 (continued)
5-18. July 16-22, 1917
19-23. July 23-31, 1917
Box Folder
401-570 1-8. July 23-31, 1917 (continued)
9-16. August 1-7, 1917
17-22. August 8-15, 1917
Box Folder
401-571 1-4. August 16-22, 1917
5-7. August 23-31, 1917
8-9. September 1-15, 1917
10-12. September 16-30, 1917
13-15. October 1-7, 1917
16-18. October 8-15, 1917
19-20. October 16-22, 1917
21-22. October 23-31, 1917
23. November 1-7, 1917
Box Folder
401-572 1-4. November 8-15, 1917
5-7. November 16-22, 1917
8-12. November 23-30, 1917
13-18. December 1-7, 1917
19-23. December 8-15, 1917
24-28. December 16-22, 1917
Box Folder
401-573 1-6. December 23-31, 1917
7. undated [1917?]
8-11. January 1-7, 1918
12-15. January 8-15, 1918
16-17. January 16-22, 1918
18-21. January 23-31, 1918
22-25. February 1-7, 1918
26-28. February 8-15, 1918
Box Folder
401-574 1-3. February 16-22, 1918
4-5. February 23-28, 1918
6-8. March 1-7, 1918
9-10. March 8-15, 1918
11-12. March 16-22, 1918
13-15. March 23-31, 1918
16-19. April 1-7, 1918
20-24. April 8-15, 1918
25-27. April 16-22, 1918
Box Folder
401-575 1-5. April 23-30, 1918
6-8. May 1-7, 1918
9-11. May 8-15, 1918
12-14. May 16-22, 1918
15-17. May 23-31, 1918
18-24. June 1-7, 1918
25-27. June 8-15, 1918
Box Folder
401-576 1-3. June 8-15, 1918 (continued)
4-7. June 16-22, 1918
8-10. June 23-30, 1918
11-12. July 1-7, 1918
13-15. July 8-15, 1918
16-18. July 16-22, 1918
19-22. July 23-31, 1918
23-25. August 1-7, 1918
26-28. August 8-15, 1918
Box Folder
401-577 1-2. August 16-22, 1918
3-5. August 23-31, 1918
6-7. September 1-7, 1918
8-10. September 8-15, 1918
11-12. September 16-22, 1918
13-14. September 23-30, 1918
15-16. October 1-7, 1918
17-18. October 8-15, 1918
19. October 16-22, 1918
20. October 23-31, 1918
21. November 1-7, 1918
22-23. November 8-15, 1918
24-25. November 16-22, 1918
26. November 23-30, 1918
Box Folder
401-578 1. December 1-7, 1918
2-3. December 8-15, 1918
4-5. December 16-22, 1918
6-8. December 23-31, 1918
9-10. January 1-7, 1919
11-12. January 8-15, 1919
13-14. January 16-22, 1919
15-17. January 23-31, 1919
18-20. February 1-7, 1919
21-22. February 8-15, 1919
23-25. February 16-22, 1919
26-27. February 23-38, 1919
28-29. March 1-7, 1919
Box Folder
401-579 1-3. March 8-15, 1919
4-6. March 16-22, 1919
7-9. March 23-31, 1919
10-11. April 1-7, 1919
12-13. April 8-15, 1919
14-15. April 16-22, 1919
16-17. April 23-30, 1919
18-19. May 1-7, 1919
20-21. May 8-15, 1919
22. May 16-22, 1919
23-24. May 23-31, 1919
25-26. June 1-7, 1919
27-28. June 8-15, 1919
Box Folder
401-580 1-2. June 16-22, 1919
3-5. June 23-30, 1919
6-8. July 1-7, 1919
9-11. July 8-15, 1919
12-13. July 16-22, 1919
14-15. July 23-31, 1919
16-17. August 1-7, 1919
18-20. August 8-15, 1919
21-22. August 16-22, 1919
23-24. August 23-31, 1919
25-26. September 1-7, 1919
27-28. September 8-15, 1919
Box Folder
401-581 1. September 16-22, 1919
2. September 23-30, 1919
3. October 1-7, 1919
4-5. October 8-15, 1919
6-7. October 16-22, 1919
8-9. October 23-31, 1919
10. November 1-7, 1919
11. November 8-15, 1919
12. November 16-22, 1919
13-14. November 23-30, 1919
15-18. December 1-7, 1919
19-23. December 8-15, 1919
24-26. December 16-22, 1919
Box Folder
401-582 1-2. December 23-31, 1919
3. undated [1919?]
4-6. January 1-15, 1920
7-9. January 16-31, 1920
10-12. February 1-15, 1920
13-15. February 16-29, 1920
16-19. March 1-15, 1920
20-22. March 16-31, 1920
23-25. April 1-15, 1920
26-28. April 16-30, 1920
Box Folder
401-583 1-4. May 1-15, 1920
5-7. May 16-31, 1920
8-10. June 1-15, 1920
11-12. June 16-30, 1920
13-15. July 1-15, 1920
16-17. July 16-31, 1920
18-19. August 1-15, 1920
20-21. August 16-31, 1920
22-23. September 1-15, 1920
24-26. September 16-30, 1920
27. October 1-15, 1920
28-30. October 16-31, 1920
Box Folder
401-584 1-2. November 1-15, 1920
3-4. November 16-30, 1920
5-7. December 1-15, 1920
8-10. December 16-31, 1920
11. undated [1920?]
12-13. January 1-7, 1921
14-16. January 8-15, 1921
17-18. January 16-22, 1921
19-21. January 23-31, 1921
22-23. February 1-7, 1921
24-26. February 8-15, 1921
27-29. February 16-22, 1921
Box Folder
401-585 1-3. February 23-28, 1921
4-6. March 1-7, 1921
7-10. March 8-15, 1921
11-12. March 16-22, 1921
13-16. March 23-31, 1921
17-18. April 1-7, 1921
19-22. April 8-15, 1921
23. April 16-22, 1921
24-25. April 23-30, 1921
26-27. May 1-7, 1921
Box Folder
401-586 1-2. May 8-15, 1921
3-5. May 16-22, 1921
6-8. May 23-31, 1921
9-10. June 1-7, 1921
11-12. June 8-15, 1921
13-14. June 16-22, 1921
15-16. June 23-30, 1921
17. July 1-7, 1921
18. July 8-15, 1921
19-20. July 16-22, 1921
21-23. July 23-31, 1921
24-25. August 1-7, 1921
26-27. August 8-15, 1921
Box Folder
401-587 1-2. August 16-22, 1921
3-5. August 23-31, 1921
6-7. September 1-7, 1921
8-10. September 8-15, 1921
11-13. September 16-22, 1921
14-15. September 23-30, 1921
16-17. October 1-7, 1921
18-19. October 8-15, 1921
20-21. October 16-22, 1921
22-23. October 23-31, 1921
24-25. November 1-7, 1921
Box Folder
401-588 1-2. November 8-15, 1921
3-4. November 16-22, 1921
5-6. November 23-30, 1921
7-8. December 1-7, 1921
9-10. December 8-15, 1921
11-12. December 16-22, 1921
13-15. December 23-31, 1921
16. undated [1921?]
17-18. January 1-7, 1922
19-21. January 8-15, 1922
22-25. January 16-22, 1922
26-29. January 23-31, 1922
Box Folder
401-589 1-3. February 1-7, 1922
4-7. February 8-15, 1922
8-11. February 16-22, 1922
12-14. February 23-28, 1922
15-17. March 1-7, 1922
18-21. March 8-15, 1922
22-24. March 16-22, 1922
25-29. March 23-31, 1922
Box Folder
401-590 1-3. April 1-7, 1922
4-6. April 8-15, 1922
7-8. April 16-22, 1922
9-10. April 23-31, 1922
11-12. May 1-7, 1922
13-15. May 8-15, 1922
16-18. May 16-22, 1922
19-21. May 23-31, 1922
22-23. June 1-7, 1922
24-26. June 8-15, 1922
Box Folder
401-591 1-2. June 16-22, 1922
3-5. June 23-30, 1922
6-7. July 1-7, 1922
8-10. July 8-15, 1922
11-12. July 16-22, 1922
13-16. July 23-31, 1922
17-21. August 1-7, 1922
22-27. August 8-15, 1922
Box Folder
401-592 1-4. August 16-22, 1922
5-10. August 23-31, 1922
11-14. September 1-7, 1922
15-20. September 8-15, 1922
21-23. September 16-22, 1922
24-28. September 23-30, 1922
Box Folder
401-593 1-4. October 1-7, 1922
5-7. October 8-15, 1922
8-9. October 16-22, 1922
10-14. October 23-31, 1922
15-20. November 1-7, 1922
21-24. November 8-15, 1922
25-28. November 16-22, 1922
Box Folder
401-594 1-5. November 23-30, 1922
6-9. December 1-7, 1922
10-14. December 8-15, 1922
15-19. December 16-22, 1922
20-23. December 23-31, 1922
24. undated [1922?]
25-30. January 1-7, 1923
Box Folder
401-595 1-7. January 8-15, 1923
8-11. January 16-22, 1923
12-17. January 23-31, 1923
18-22. February 1-7, 1923
23-28. February 8-15, 1923
29-32. February 16-22, 1923
Box Folder
401-596 1-4. February 23-28, 1923
5-8. March 1-7, 1923
9-12. March 8-15, 1923
13-17. March 16-22, 1923
18-23. March 23-31, 1923
24-27. April 1-7, 1923
28-31. April 8-15, 1923
Box Folder
401-597 1-4. April 16-22, 1923
5-9. April 23-30, 1923
10-14. May 1-7, 1923
15-20. May 8-15, 1923
21-24. May 16-22, 1923
25-29. May 23-31, 1923
Box Folder
401-598 1-4. June 1-7, 1923
5-9. June 8-15, 1923
10-13. June 16-22, 1923
14-17. June 23-30, 1923
18-20. July 1-7, 1923
21-23. July 8-15, 1923
24-26. July 16-22, 1923
27-30. July 23-31, 1923
Box Folder
401-599 1-3. August 1-7, 1923
4-6. August 8-15, 1923
7-8. August 16-22, 1923
9-14. August 23-31, 1923
15-19. September 1-7, 1923
20-24. September 8-15, 1923
25-29. September 16-22, 1923
Box Folder
401-600 1-4. September 23-30, 1923
5-8. October 1-7, 1923
9-12. October 8-15, 1923
13-15. October 16-22, 1923
16-19. October 23-31, 1923
20-22. November 1-7, 1923
23-25. November 8-15, 1923
26-28. November 16-22, 1923
Box Folder
401-601 1-3. November 23-31, 1923
4-7. December 1-7, 1923
8-11. December 8-15, 1923
12-13. December 16-22, 1923
14-15. December 23-31, 1923
16-18. January 1-15, 1924
19-21. January 16-31, 1924
22-25. February 1-15, 1924
26-28. February 16-29, 1924
29-31. March 1-15, 1924
Box Folder
401-602 1-3. March 16-31, 1924
4-7. April 1-15, 1924
8-10. April 16-30, 1924
11-12. May 1-15, 1924
13-14. May 16-31, 1924
15-16. June 1-15, 1924
17-19. June 16-30, 1924
20-21. July 1-15, 1924
22-23. July 16-31, 1924
24. August 1-15, 1924
25-26. August 16-31, 1924
27-28. September 1-15, 1924
29-30. September 16-30, 1924
Box Folder
401-603 1-2. October 1-15, 1924
3-4. October 16-31, 1924
5-6. November 1-15, 1924
7-8. November 16-30, 1924
9-10. December 1-15, 1924
11. December 16-31, 1924
12. undated [1924?]
13. January 1925
14. February 1925
15. March 1925
16-17. April 1925
18. May 1925
19. June 1925
20. July 1925
21. August 1925
22. September 1925
23. October 1925
24. November 1925
25. December 1925
26. January 1926
27. February 1926
28-29. March 1926
Box Folder
401-604 1-2. April 1926
3-4. May 1926
5. June 1926
6. July 1926
7. August 1926
8. September 1926
9. October 1926
10. November 1926
11. December 1926
12. January 1927
13. February 1927
14-15. March 1927
16-18. April 1927
19-22. May 1927
23-26. June 1927
27-30. July 1927
Box Folder
401-605 1-5. August 1927
6-10. September 1927
11-13. October 1927
14-17. November 1927
18-19. December 1927
20-22. January 1928
23-25. February 1928
Box Folder
401-606 1-2. March 1928
3-4. April 1928
5-7. May 1928
8-10. June 1928
11. July 1928
12-14. August 1928
15-16. September 1928
17-18. October 1928
19-20. November 1928
21. December 1928
22-23. January 1929
24-25. February 1929
Box Folder
401-607 1-2. March 1929
3-4. April 1929
5-7. May 1929
8. June 1929
9-10. July 1929
11. August 1929
12-13. September 1929
14-15. October 1929
16. November 1929
17. December 1929
18-19. January 1930
20-21. February 1930
22-23. March 1930
24-25. April 1930
26-28. May 1930
Box Folder
401-608 1-2. June 1930
3-4. July 1930
5-6. August 1930
7-8. September 1930
9-10. October 1930
11-12. November 1930
13-14. December 1930
15-16. January 1931
17-19. February 1931
20-21. March 1931
22-23. April 1931
24-26. May 1931
Box Folder
401-609 1-2. June 1931
3-4. July 1931
5-8. August 1931
9-12. September 1931
13. October 1931
14-15. November 1931
16-17. December 1931
18-20. January 1932
21-22. February 1932
23-24. March 1932
25-26. April 1932
27-28. May 1932
Box Folder
401-610 1-3. June 1932
4-5. July 1932
6. August 1932
7-8. September 1932
9-10. October 1932
11. November 1932
12. December 1932
13. January-February 1933
14. March-April 1933
15. May-June 1933
16. September 17-22, 1934
17. April 2-August 8, 1935
18. January 9, 1936
19. January 22, June 1-5, 1937
20. January 14, May 10, 1938
21. December 19, 1942;
21. January 15, March 13, June 8, 1943
Box Folder
401-381 1-2. undated

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Letter books and letterpress books, 1861-1863, 1871-1905,
10.54 cubic ft. (94 volumes)

These records consist of two volumes of letter books (1861-1863) and 90 volumes of letterpress books (1871-1905). Both were maintained by the Texas Adjutant General's Department as a record of letters sent by that office.
The Civil War letter books are two volumes, totalling 1,245 pages, which contain copies of letters sent out by J. Y. Dashiell, adjutant and inspector general of Texas, between November 15, 1861 and September 16, 1863. Recipients of these letters include brigade officers, Ranger officers, county officials, and private citizens. The margins contain cross references to other letters, in red ink. Only the second volume (November 26, 1862, through September 16, 1863) contains an index.
The post-Civil War letterpress books date from August 14, 1871, through December 20, 1905. The following gaps exist, totalling approximately 20 months, where four volumes are apparently missing:
  • August 28, 1877-February 26, 1878;
  • January 28-May 22, 1893;
  • February 24-October 17, 1904;
  • August 5-October 19, 1905.
Each of the letterpress books includes an alphabetical index, which lists persons to whom the letters are addressed; in addition, the indexes for the 19th century indicate the subjects of the letters, in red ink. One stray index may pertain to one of the last two missing letterpress books listed above, most likely the last. Virtually all of the letters are signed by the adjutant general, or by someone specifically designated as acting in the absence of the adjutant general: e.g., the assistant adjutant general, or the chief clerk. The copies are mostly handwritten until May 1896, after which date the majority are typescript; Adjutant General A.P. Wozencraft's letters, however, are nearly all handwritten (May-December 1898). Most of the letters from 1874 through 1883 are coded with the numbers of the incoming letters to which they are replies; these codes correspond to the Registers of letters received subseries, described elsewhere. The volumes for 1903-1905 are incomplete through mutilation; the bulk of the pages have been razored out. However, copies of outgoing correspondence began to be included in the Departmental correspondence files at about this same time.
In addition to these general letterpress books, the adjutant general's office maintained specialized volumes for specific military organizations and/or for specific staff members. Outgoing letters were copied into separate letterpress books for the Reserve Militia (June 22, 1870-December 18, 1871) and for the Texas State Police (July 1, 1870-August 15, 1871). One volume was maintained by the paymaster (March 14, 1871-March 14, 1872). Letters sent by the quartermaster of the Frontier Battalion form a sizable group, with no gaps from August 22, 1883, through September 4, 1902. Four letterpress books were kept by the quartermaster of the Ranger force and/or the Texas National Guard between August 1, 1902, and October 18, 1906. Finally, eleven letterpress books contain receipts for final payment of payroll checks to members of the Texas Volunteers for the Spanish-American War. These specialized letterpress books are described in several appropriate subseries of Adjutant General's Organization records.
Arrangement
These records are arranged chronologically.
Preferred Citation
(Identify the item), Letter books and letterpress books, Texas Adjutant General's Department departmental correspondence. Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.
Accession Information
Accession numbers: 1933/001 and unknown
Approximately two-thirds of these records (those dating 1861-1863 and 1870-1900) were transferred to the Texas State Archives by the Texas Adjutant General's Department on February 21, 1934. Accession data is too incomplete to determine when the remaining third of the series (1901-1905) was transferred.
Restrictions on Use
Letterpress books are extremely fragile; pages are tissue-thin and bindings are either broken or ready to break. Therefore they may not be photocopied, and must be treated with great care.
Processing Information
Processed by Tony Black, January 1986
Edited for DACS compliance by Lauren Davis, August 2019
Letter books
Volume
401-975 1861-1862
Volume
401-976 1862-1863
Letterpress books
Volume
401-611 August 14-December 14, 1871
Volume
401-612 December 18-31, 1871
January 2-December 30, 1871
(telegrams)
Volume
401-613 January 3-April 9, 1872
Volume
401-614 April 9-June 24, 1872
Volume
401-615 June 22-August 8, 1872
Volume
401-616 August 8-November 19, 1872
Volume
401-617 November 19, 1872-January 10, 1873
Volume
401-618 January 11-March 6, 1873
Volume
401-619 March 6-May 30, 1873
Volume
401-620 May 30, 1873-January 14, 1874
Volume
401-621 January 19-December 31, 1874
Volume
401-622 January 2-November 30, 1875
Volume
401-623 December 1, 1875-December 8, 1876
Volume
401-624 December 9, 1876-August 28, 1877
Volume
401-625 February 26, 1878-January 25, 1879
Volume
401-626 January 30-July 16, 1879
Volume
401-627 July 16, 1879-January 26, 1880
Volume
401-628 January 27-September 20, 1880
Volume
401-629 September 21, 1880-April 1, 1882
Volume
401-630 April 6, 1882-November 6, 1883
Volume
401-631 November 6, 1883-September 8, 1884
Volume
401-632 September 8, 1884-August 22, 1885
Volume
401-633 August 24, 1885-July 22, 1886
Volume
401-634 July 28, 1886-May 4, 1887
Volume
401-635 May 6-October 24, 1887
Volume
401-636 October 24, 1887-May 24, 1888
Volume
401-1135 May 23, 1888-April 15, 1889
Volume
401-637 April 17-October 14, 1889
Volume
401-638 October 15, 1889-April 30, 1890
Volume
401-639 May 2, 1890-January 22, 1891
Volume
401-640 January 24-May 26, 1891
Volume
401-641 May 26-August 1, 1891
Volume
401-642 August 1-September 11, 1891
Volume
401-643 September 11-November 30, 1891
Volume
401-644 December 1, 1891-February 24, 1892
Volume
401-645 February 25-May 12, 1892
Volume
401-646 May 18-July 23, 1892
Volume
401-647 July 25-October 6, 1892
Volume
401-648 October 5, 1892-January 28, 1893
Volume
401-649 May 22-July 12, 1893
Volume
401-650 July 13-September 25, 1893
Volume
401-651 September 26-December 31, 1893
Volume
401-652 January 1-April 25, 1894
Volume
401-653 April 26-July 6, 1894
Volume
401-654 July 6-November 13, 1894
Volume
401-655 November 12, 1894-April 23, 1895
Volume
401-656 April 23-July 30, 1895
Volume
401-657 July 31-December 30, 1895
Volume
401-658 January 2-April 30, 1896
Volume
401-659 April 30-July 10, 1896
Volume
401-660 July 11-December 14, 1896
Volume
401-661 December 15, 1896-April 16, 1897
Volume
401-662 April 17-June 26, 1897
Volume
401-663 June 26-September 23, 1897
Volume
401-664 September 24, 1897-February 8, 1898
Volume
401-665 February 11-April 16, 1898
Volume
401-666 April 16-July 26, 1898
Volume
401-667 July 26, 1898-February 15, 1899
Volume
401-668 February 17-April 28, 1899
Volume
401-669 April 29-June 27, 1899
Volume
401-670 June 27-August 8, 1899
Volume
401-671 August 9-September 16, 1899
Volume
401-672 September 16-October 29, 1899
Volume
401-673 October 30-December 6, 1899
Volume
401-674 December 6, 1899-January 6, 1900
Volume
401-675 January 6-February 6, 1900
Volume
401-676 February 6-April 10, 1900
Volume
401-676A April 10-June 11, 1900
Volume
401-677 June 11-July 16, 1900
Volume
401-678 July 16-September 19, 1900
Volume
401-679 September 19-December 20, 1900
Volume
401-680 December 21, 1900-March 27, 1901
Volume
401-681 March 28-June 1, 1901
Volume
401-682 June 1-July 12, 1901
Volume
401-683 July 12-September 25, 1901
Volume
401-684 September 24, 1901-January 4, 1902
Volume
401-685 January 4-March 6, 1902
Volume
401-686 March 5-May 19, 1902
Volume
401-687 May 20-July 11, 1902
Volume
401-688 July 12-September 19, 1902
Volume
401-689 September 19, 1902-January 6, 1903
Volume
401-690 January 6-March 12, 1903
Volume
401-691 March 12-May 8, 1903
Volume
401-691-A Index, March 12-May 8, 1903
Volume
401-692 May 8-June 26, 1903
Volume
401-693 June 3, 1903-July 19, 1905
Volume
401-694 June 26-August 11, 1903
Volume
401-695 August 11-November 2, 1903
Volume
401-696 November 6, 1903-February 24, 1904
Volume
401-697 October 17, 1904-February 24, 1905
Volume
401-698 February 24-July 10, 1905
Volume
401-699 July 11-August 5, 1905
Volume
401-700 October 19-December 20, 1905
Volume
401-1146 Stray index (1905?)

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Registers of letters received, 1870-1883,
2.57 cubic ft. (5 volumes)

These records consist of five large volumes that register the letters received by the Texas Adjutant General between November 1870 and January 1883. The format is standardized into the following columns:
  1. date received, and (in red ink) a sequential number; the numbers begin again at "1" with each letter of the alphabet;
  2. name of the sender, and (in red ink) the disposition of the letter (e.g., "filed," or "commission issued [date]," or "l[etter] s[ent] [date]");
  3. place, date written, and purport (a short description of the subject of the letter).
Each of these five volumes are indexed separately; the indexes are described in the Indexes to letters received subseries.
The adjutant general's office maintained four additional registers of letters received, which are described under the appropriate series. One of these registered incoming correspondence concerning the Texas State Troops (January 1862, through November 1863). Another of these registered incoming correspondence concerning the State Police (May 14, 1870, through January 7, 1871). Still another abstracted incoming correspondence concerning the Militia (July 28, 1870, through January 10, 1871). And finally, there is a register of letters received for the 1st Infantry, Texas National Guard (January 16, 1906, through July 21, 1907).
Arrangement
The volumes are arranged chronologically. Within each volume, the abstracts of letters are arranged alphabetically by the first letter of the last name of the author of the letter, and then chronologically according to the date the letter was received.
Preferred Citation
(Identify the item), Registers of letters received, Texas Adjutant General's Department departmental correspondence. Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.
Accession Information
Accession number: 1933/001 (?)
There is no firm accession data on these records, but they were probably transferred to the Texas State Archives by the Texas Adjutant General's Department on February 21, 1934.
Restrictions on Use
None.
Processing Information
Processed by Tony Black, January 1986
Edited for DACS compliance by Lauren Davis, August 2019
Registers of letters received
Volume
401-701 November 1870-August 1871
Volume
401-702 September 1871-September 1872
Volume
401-703 September 1872-July 1874
Volume
401-704 July 1874-December 1879
Volume
401-705 January 1880-January 1883

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Indexes to letters received, 1870-1899,
0.88 cubic ft. (13 volumes)

These records consist of thirteen alphabetical indexes to letters received by the Texas Adjutant General, dating 1870-1899. The first six indexes cover the period November 1870, through January 1883, and are actually indexes to volumes 1 through 5 of the Registers of letters received subseries, described elsewhere). A typical entry in volume 4 (401-709), for example, would be "Horton 132," which refers to volume 4, item number 132 under the letter H (which normally stands for the first letter of the last name of the person sending the letter). The actual piece of correspondence would bear the code "H4132." Persons who sent letters are indexed in black ink; subjects of letters (both persons and topics) are indexed in red ink.
The remaining indexes either refer to registers which are not extant, or else do not refer to any registers at all, but rather directly to the correspondence itself. At any rate, they are useful as a partial guide to the departmental correspondence. These cover the years 1883 through 1885 ( "Volumes 1-12"), 1886 through 1888 ( "Volumes 13-27"), 1889 through 1890 ( "File Cases A-F"), 1891-1892, 1893-1894, 1895-1898, and at least part of 1899.
A comparison of the actual departmental correspondence for 1883 through 1899 indicates several different filing systems. Beginning with January 1883, most incoming letters are marked as in the following examples:
  • "1.D.1" (a letter sent by a Mr. Davis dated January 11, 1883, apparently the first item under the Ds in the first volume of a vanished series of registers beginning with 1883);
  • "12.V.2" (a letter from a Capt. Van Zandt dated December 30, 1885, the second item under the Vs in volume 12);
  • "18.D.6" (a letter from the captain of Company D, dated January 6, 1886, the sixth item under the Ds in volume 18).
Beginning with January 1889, a new system began. The index of 1889-1890 is indexed for correspondents with names from A through Z, for "file cases" A through F; thus a letter dated February 19, 1889 from J. D. Morrow is marked "A101," signifying item 101 under (or in) File Case A. It is uncertain what the "file cases" represented, except that they do not correspond to the names of either senders or subjects.
With January 1891, and at least for the rest of the 19th century, the codes reverted back to a recognizable system:
  • "L-2-91" (a letter from a person named Levy, dated January 3, 1891, the second item under the Ls in 1891);
  • "H-1512-98" (a letter from a person named Houston, dated December 22, 1898, item number 1512 under the Hs in 1898). In 1899 only letters whose senders' names began with the letters A through J are indexed.
Arrangement
These records are arranged chronologically.
Preferred Citation
(Identify the item), Indexes to letters received, Texas Adjutant General's Department departmental correspondence. Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.
Accession Information
Accession number: 1933/001 (?)
There is no firm accession data on these records, but they were probably transferred to the Texas State Archives by the Texas Adjutant General's Department on February 21, 1934.
Restrictions on Use
None.
Processing Information
Processed by Tony Black, January 1986
Edited for DACS compliance by Lauren Davis, August 2019
Indexes to letters received
Volume
401-706A Volume 1, 1870-1871
Volume
401-707 Volume 2, 1871
Volume
401-707A 1872
Volume
401-708 Volume 3, 1872 and 1873
Volume
401-709 Volume 4, July 1874-December 1879
Volume
401-706 Volume 5, January 1880-January 1883
Volume
401-710 1883-1885
Volume
401-711 1886-1888
Volume
401-712 1889-1890
Volume
401-712A 1891-1892
Volume
401-712B 1893-1894
Volume
401-712C 1895-1898
Volume
401-713 A-J, January 17, 1899-?

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